Consciousness
Follow
7.7K views | +0 today
Consciousness
It's a mystery...
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Augmented Collective Intelligence
Scoop.it!

How Consciousness Evolved and Why a Planetary “Übermind” Is Inevitable

How Consciousness Evolved and Why a Planetary “Übermind” Is Inevitable | Consciousness | Scoop.it

I haven't read this yet, but it's going on my list toward the top. -- Howard

 

"In Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist (public library), neuroscientist Christof Koch — “reductionist, because I seek quantitative explanations for consciousness in the ceaseless and ever-varied activity of billions of tiny nerve cells, each with their tens of thousands of synapses; romantic, because of my insistence that the universe has contrails of meaning that can be deciphered in the sky about us and deep within us” — explores how subjective feelings, or consciousness, come into being. Among Koch’s most fascinating arguments is one that bridges philosophy, evolutionary biology and technofuturism to predict a global Übermind not unlike McLuhan’s “global village,” but one in which our technology melds with what Carl Jung has termed the “collective unconscious” to produce a kind of sentient global brain:"

 

"There is no reason why this web of hypertrophied consciousness cannot spread to the planets and, ultimately, beyond the stellar night to th..."


Via Howard Rheingold
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience and philosophy must work together

Neuroscience and philosophy must work together | Consciousness | Scoop.it

To a large extent consciousness has been dethroned from the central role it used to occupy in the study of our mental lives. Freud persuaded us that there is more going on mentally than we are consciously aware of, and that sometimes others can know more about what we are thinking and feeling than we do. Now we are also learning more and more from neuroscience and neurobiology about how much of what we do is the result of unconscious processes and mechanisms. And we are discovering that there are different levels of consciousness, different kinds of awareness, and that much of our thinking and decision-making can go on without it. So a more pressing question might be, what is consciousness for? Is it just a mere mental accompaniment to what is going to happen anyway? In that case it may be our sense of self and self-control that is most in need of revision.

 

by Barry Smith

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

What is Consciousness?

What is Consciousness? | Consciousness | Scoop.it

Sometimes, in order to critically analyze a mysterious and complex phenomenon, it helps to define its opposite.

 

We might gain traction if we think about what it means to be unconscious or have our conscious minds altered in some way by hypnosis, meditation or drugs.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Natural Language processing
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung’s Archetypes | Wired Cosmos

Carl Jung’s Archetypes | Wired Cosmos | Consciousness | Scoop.it

In order to understand archetypes we must understand the nature and function of the collective unconscious. According to Jung, the collective unconscious is not like the personal unconscious as first introduced by psychoanalysis. It is detached from the personal unconscious because it belongs to the human species as a whole. It is inherited, just as physical aspects of our bodies are inherited. Because of this, a human being does not enter the world as a blank slate but rather with the innate and inherited tendencies of the collective unconscious. These tendencies are what Jung termed “archetypes.”


Via Fico Ventilatory, Mariana Soffer
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The User Illusion: Cutting Consiousness Down to Size

The User Illusion: Cutting Consiousness Down to Size | Consciousness | Scoop.it

In his book The User Illusion: Cutting Consciousness Down to Size Danish science journalist Tor Norretranders presents a scientifically sound and intellectually stimulating theory of conscious experience. “The user illusion” refers to a computer users idea of how the computer works based on how they interact with it. The bits and bytes are concealed by a largely metaphorical, extremely simplified, and not necessarily accurate illusion. Norretranders central thesis is that consciousness is our user illusion of ourselves. Consciousness arises after much information has been discarded. Conscious experience is a manageable distillation, essence, of our extremely rich raw experience. The User Illusion is incredibly readable in spite of its plethora of references. Norretranders pulls from innumerable sources, most notably Gödel, Libet, and Shannon. He integrates a wide array of prior research, tying together ideas from information theory, thermodynamics, physics, psychology, and philosophy to substantiate his theory; this is indeed the strongest aspect of the book.

 

Norretranders builds his theory of consciousness on the tenants of information theory. He makes sure the reader understands the basics before he applies them to his broader claims. The take home message is the notion of information and exformation. Exformation is discarded information. Norretrander uses the example of grocery shopping, among others. At the register the prices of the individual items are summed, it is this number, the total, that we are interested in. The sum is useful to us, it tells us how much money to take out of our wallet, the individual prices are not, they are irrelevant once we obtain the total. The author then extrapolates to consciousness, explaining that a huge amount of information must be discarded along the path from unconscious to conscious experience.

 

via Serendip's Exchange

more...
No comment yet.