Conscientious Objectors during WW2
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part 3: paragraphs about the objectors, and what i think about it, and what i think they could of did better

part 3: paragraphs about the objectors, and what i think about it, and what i think they could of did better | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it
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FS_Conscientious_objection_ENG.pdf

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this is more about tha objecors today. this is about how in europe people have to go to war

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primary source #3

primary source #3 | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it
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Subject

Think about the information the document conveys. Form an overall impression and then examine individual items or specific parts.

Whatisthegeneraltopic?

·      Objectors in WW2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatarethreethingstheauthorsaidthatyouthink areimportant?

·      It is a picture but the things that stood out to me was how they were treated

·      The men are basically breaking there backs

Occasionand Audience

Whattypeofdocumentisit?

□ Newspaper           □ Poster          □ Letter

□ Advertisement    □ Drawing       □ Diaryentry

□ Leaflet                 □ Map             □ Memorandum

□ Flyer                   □ Photograph   □ Legalrecord

□ Other: photograph

 

Whataretheuniquephysicalqualities?

□ Handwritten         □ Typed          □ Signature

□ Picture,symbols  □ Seal(s)         □ Notations

□ Letterhead            □ Stamps         □ Caption

□ Officialstamp:i.e.,date,““RECEIVED,””““PAID””

□ Other: picture

 

Support each answer with document evidence:

Whowastheintendedaudience? 3rd person

 

 

 

Whenwasthedocumentcreatedorcirculated?

·      No date

Purpose

Whydoyouthinkthisdocumentwascreated?What specificevidenceinthedocumenthelpsyouknow whyitwascreated?

·      This photograph was created for evidence on how the men where treated back in those day’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatdoesthedocumentconveyaboutlifeinthe

UnitedStatesatthetimeitwascreated?

·      It shows how brutal a person can be to a human being

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatquestionsdoesthedocumentraise?:

·      What could make a man do this to another man

Speaker

Think about the occupation, gender, religion, nationality, and class of thecreator of the document.

Whocreatedthedocument?Howdoyouknow?

·      It is a photo graph

 

 

 

 

Whatpositionortitledidheorshehold?Isthis personaninsideroranoutsider?Howdoyouknow?

Didn’t hold any position it’s a photograph

 

 

 

 

 

Whosevoiceisnotrepresentedinthedocument? Whydoyouthinkthatvoicewasleftout?

·      Photo graph

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primary source #1

primary source #1 | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it
Anthony Jesse's insight:


Subject

Think about the information the document conveys. Form an overall impression and then examine individual items or specific parts.

·      Whatisthegeneraltopic? This was about how he didn’t go to the war and how he was treated

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatarethreethingstheauthorsaidthatyouthink areimportant?

·      I felt I had some obligation to my country, but it was not an obligation that included wreaking violence on others

·      The trees were dead and they were just standing there, so we cut them down and cut them up for firewood. The work of national importance under civilian direction, but that was it. Of course, that was during the wintertime.

·      I registered as a conscientious objector and then I got my noticeto report to camp.

 

 

Occasionand Audience

Whattypeofdocumentisit?

□ Newspaper           □ Poster          □ Letter

□ Advertisement    □ Drawing       □ Diaryentry

□ Leaflet                 □ Map             □ Memorandum

□ Flyer                   □ Photograph   □ Legalrecord

□ Other interview

 

Whataretheuniquephysicalqualities?

□ Handwritten         □ Typed          □ Signature

□ Picture,symbols  □ Seal(s)         □ Notations

□ Letterhead            □ Stamps         □ Caption

□ Officialstamp:i.e.,date,““RECEIVED,””““PAID””

□ Other typed

 

Support each answer with document evidence:

Whowastheintendedaudience? This was intended for people now days to read

 

 

 

Whenwasthedocumentcreatedorcirculated?

Was created in may 7, 2003

Purpose

Whydoyouthinkthisdocumentwascreated?What specificevidenceinthedocumenthelpsyouknow whyitwascreated?

·      This was created to show the people now what happened to the men that who didn’t want to go to the war during the draft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatdoesthedocumentconveyaboutlifeinthe

UnitedStatesatthetimeitwascreated?

·      It really wasn’t about the united states but it shows how messed up people where back then

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatquestionsdoesthedocumentraise?

·      Was the really necessary to do to people who didn’t want to go to the war

Speaker

Think about the occupation, gender, religion, nationality, and class of thecreator of the document.

Whocreatedthedocument?Howdoyouknow?

·      Don’t say who created the doc but it is a primary source it is an interview. But it gives the name of the man that they interviewed

 

 

 

 

Whatpositionortitledidheorshehold?Isthis personaninsideroranoutsider?Howdoyouknow?

·      This person is an out sider because he refused to go to war

 

 

 

 

Whosevoiceisnotrepresentedinthedocument? Whydoyouthinkthatvoicewasleftout?

·      The mans voice that they interviewed was represented

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Conscientious objector - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Conscientious objector - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Historically, many conscientious objectors have been executed, imprisoned, or otherwise penalized when their beliefs led to actions conflicting with their society's legal system or government. The legal definition and status of conscientious objection has varied over the years and from nation to nation.

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I learned a lot of other things about objectors. I learned that some of the objectors was killed and some where even experimented on. I also can include that the reason that made men object was called a draft a draft is something that makes young men have to serve in the war.

 

 

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vocabulary words you may not know: definitions and sentences

vocabulary words you may not know: definitions and sentences | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it
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Conscientious objectors past and present

Conscientious objectors past and present | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it
Letters: There needs to be a much bigger outcry till the government is forced to stop funding murder, war and repression in other countries
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this is about war objectors preasen and the past

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Primary Source #2: Oral Interview with Igal Roodenko

Primary Source #2: Oral Interview with Igal Roodenko | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it


Subject

Think about the information the document conveys. Form an overall impression and then examine individual items or specific parts.

Whatisthegeneraltopic? Conscientious objectors in WW2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatarethreethingstheauthorsaidthatyouthink areimportant?

·      He said that they were real racist to black people

·      They barely got to eat

·      And they were treated very poorly

 

Occasionand Audience

Whattypeofdocumentisit?

□ Newspaper           □ Poster          □ Letter

□ Advertisement    □ Drawing       □ Diaryentry

□ Leaflet                 □ Map             □ Memorandum

□ Flyer                   □ Photograph   □ Legalrecord

□ Other: interview

 

Whataretheuniquephysicalqualities?

□ Handwritten         □ Typed          □ Signature

□ Picture,symbols  □ Seal(s)         □ Notations

□ Letterhead            □ Stamps         □ Caption

□ Officialstamp:i.e.,date,““RECEIVED,””““PAID””

□ Other: typed

 

Support each answer with document evidence:

Whowastheintendedaudience?

·      The intended audience was the people reading it

 

 

 

Whenwasthedocumentcreatedorcirculated?

April 11, 1974.

Purpose

Whydoyouthinkthisdocumentwascreated?What specificevidenceinthedocumenthelpsyouknow whyitwascreated?

·      This document was created to inform people what was going on with the objectors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatdoesthedocumentconveyaboutlifeinthe

UnitedStatesatthetimeitwascreated?

·      Was created April 11, 1974. It says that life was bad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whatquestionsdoesthedocumentraise? :

·      Who started all of this brutal stuff about objectors

Speaker

Think about the occupation, gender, religion, nationality, and class of thecreator of the document.

Whocreatedthedocument?Howdoyouknow?

·      Don’t say who created the document but it gives the name of the person interviewed

·      Igal Roodenko

 

 

 

Whatpositionortitledidheorshehold?Isthis personaninsideroranoutsider?Howdoyouknow?

·      Out sider refused to go to the war

 

 

 

 

Whosevoiceisnotrepresentedinthedocument? Whydoyouthinkthatvoicewasleftout?

·      The mans voice that was interviewing maybe the man that he was interviewing was very interesting

 

 

Anthony Jesse's insight:

Oral History Interview with Igal Roodenko, April 11, 1974. Interview B-0010. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

JERRY WINGATE:

The question I started to ask you a minute ago, Igal, was a very complex one. After you got recognized as a conscientious objector, you went to the CO camp. While you were in the CO camp, something very important to the pacifist movement happened, and a bunch of you went to jail from the camps. What were the camps like? What about this big shift in the pacifist position in this period, and what happened in the prisons.

JACQUELYN HALL:

What was it that turned you to the question of race at this point?

IGAL RODENKO:

Well, race was before that.

JACQUELYN HALL:

For the pacifist movement in general?

IGAL RODENKO:

I thought you were talking about me personally. I was, like a lot of good folk, thinking of the horror of racialism back in the thirties, when I was a kid. I want to alter one of the things you said. You said a whole group of people left the camps. It was not a whole group, there were ones, and twos, and threes. Each went by himself. The camps, to go back historically, the administration recognized that they were going to have a lot of CO's, and they didn't want to go through the terrible things that happened in World War I, when several dozen people were sentenced to death for refusing to participate. That whole period of the thirties, the anti-war movement, sort of modified and created a much more open situation. Whatever the reasons may be, they wanted a looser structure for dissidents, and when they set up the Selective Service System, wondering what to do with the CO's, they fell back on the very simple pattern. The Quakers and some other groups had work camps all through the twenties and thirties, in which largely middle-class white kids would go and spend their summers building a community center in some little Mexican village or working in Appalachia or in Algeria, or something. This was helping our poor brothers.

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER:

What were they called:

IGAL RODENKO:

They were called work camps. Selective Service, and I think the President of Michigan State University was the original director of Selective Service, and a very decent guy, I think he had worked with the [American Friends] Service Committee, set up this pattern of work camps. But the guy died, and this was when Hershey was appointed. Hershey ran the thing for several decades. The thing that these people didn't understand, the Service Committee and the church groups that supported the camp program didn't understand, and this was the basic error, was that there is all the difference in the world between a voluntary program and an enforced program. When they tried to enforce this work camp system on the CO's they ran into an enormous amount of trouble, although large numbers accepted it. In the camps, they said they would ask the CO's to prove their sincerity by supporting themselves while they were in these camps, and they asked all of us to pay thirty dollars a month for our board and keep. The peace churches agreed if the young man couldn't supply this, they would ask his family, they would ask his church and finally, if they couldn't find the money elsewhere, the underwrote the program. They must have put $9,000,000 in this program in the course of World War II. Many of the camps worked, but there were, from the very beginning, dissidents. It started perhaps, or was highlighted by a group of Union Theological students, led by Dave Dellinger and George Houser and a few others, who refused to register in the very beginning, when the draft was signed, the day that people were asked to register. They were looked on as absolute freaks. As we got deeper into the war, we began to realize - we being a very small number of less church types in the CO camps - that the camps were set up not because the government values conscience and respects it, but were set up because the government recognizes that the CO's were a bunch of troublemakers and dissidents, and even if they could force them into the army, they would be more trouble than they were worth, and the camp system was a means of getting us out of circulation. They had rules that you could do your alternative service, but you had to be at least fifty miles away from any place you had ever lived in. So you wouldn't be a focus for anti-war activity of any kind. The other problem is that conscientious objection is pretty much of a middle class phenomenon. Here are people who are idealistic and dedicated and competent in one way or another, and they found themselves digging ditches. We didn't object to digging ditches per se, we objected to the tremendous waste of competence when there was a shortage. There were a lot of teachers who were CO's, and there were a lot of places in America that needed teachers and needed them badly. We weren't given anything in which we could put our efforts and our abilities. This kind of accentuated a growing dissatisfaction and disillusionment with the camp system. The other thing that happened was that guys like Dellinger and Peck and others, who refused to have anything to do with conscription to begin with, went into the prisons, and then started a series of actions within prisons. The first was in Danbury, Connecticut, at the Federal priosn there, where a group of our people went on strike finally because of the racial segregation in the dining room. This was Connecticut, not North Carolina or Georgia. Finally, that was broken down. What was happening, you see, was that the heroes of the CO movement were all in prison and not in these camps. I know what happened within me, and I think this is fairly typical. There is a great deal of apprehension because, I wasn't part of this crusade against this ultimate evil of Hitler, and there is this guilt feeling. Two, I wasn't serving in any other way. I was cutting brush down in the Eastern Shore of Maryland in a project, and later driving a truck on someproject in Colorado where the resident engineer said the only reason they are doing this thing was that they had free labor. If they didn't have our free labor, they wouldn't do it, it wouldn't be justified, the earthen dam we were building. There was the guilt feeling about not being part of our generation fighting Hitler, there was the frustration of our energies and abilities not being used. Then there was the rationalization that the Selective Service System was not interested in recognizing conscience, but in keeping us out of circulation. Then, finally, I know I had the very conscious feeling that if the war suddenly ended and I hadn't made the prison scene, I would feel cheated. Having come to that conclusion, I had to wait for the right moment. In this Colorado camp, there were a lot of troublemakers and we were running a contest with the camp administration. They were trying to get guys to leave and go in the army, and we were trying to get guys to leave and go into prison. We had a big score-board outside on the wall of the latrine, and we were always two or three ahead of them. * Administration In the course of several months, about thirty guys broke, and refused to cooperate, left and didn't come back and were ultimately arrested and jailed. Finally, and it was a moment of - one has to wait for a moment of total ripeness, it isn't simply intellectualism, it is not simply a gut decision, it is something that you have to live with - when we got word that a group of our people and Dellinger was one of them at Lewisberg Penitentiary in Pennsylvania had gone on a hunger strike because of excessive mail censorship. This mail censorship can be really petty. They will let Playboy in and won't let the Peacemaker in, or something like that. That was it. I'd never met Dellinger, but he was one of my heroes. Murphy and Taylor in that Danbury thing were my heroes. Suddenly, that was the last straw. I went on a hunger strike and a work strike. In due time, in about ten days or two weeks, I was arrested, and charged, and released on bail. I went on trial and appeal, and I finally lost. I had to start serving a three year sentence. By this time, it was all down hill. The difficult moment was, am I or am I not a CO, which occurred years before. Then one thing follows another fairly easily.

 

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Conscientious Objectors During World War II

Conscientious Objectors During World War II | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it
Watching The "Good War" and Those Who Refused to Fight It last night was an excellent complement to the 7 episodes of Ken Burns' The War.  42,000 American men were classified as conscientious objec...
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I have learned a lot more information by using this website. I have learned that kids where even getting put in bad places. Also I learned that some of the men who objected had options to do other things but they didn’t.

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Website #1: UCI Libraries - The War Within, Part 5: Conscientious Objectors in World War II

Website #1: UCI Libraries - The War Within, Part 5: Conscientious Objectors in World War II | Conscientious Objectors during WW2 | Scoop.it
UCIrvine Libraries
Anthony Jesse's insight:

There are a lot of things that I have learned from this website that I really knew nothing about. I learned about how many people objected from the war, and how the people who did object from the war got put in jail or camps. I also learned that some of the men that did object the war only did it because they did not believe in violence. If the objectors where found they would be assigned work to do from the government. Lastly I have learned a lot from this site it gave me a lot of different information about the objectors.

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