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Learning in a networked and collaborative way
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Top 10 Secret Features of iOS 6

Top 10 Secret Features of iOS 6 | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Apple released iOS 6 this week, bringing a handful of new features to iPhones, iPads, and iPod touches. While they defined many of the flagship features, several were left unsaid. These are our 10 favorite secret features in iOS 6.
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Another Stunningly Bad Vision for Learning

Another Stunningly Bad Vision for Learning | Connected educator | Scoop.it

On another note, I’ve been thinking lately that there’s a whole ‘nother level of problem with the “personalized learning” term. You can’t really personalize learning can you? You can personalize content with the aim that students will learn something. But the learning isn’t fait accompli.Personal learning is just that. Personalized? #notsomuch

Thoughts?

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Skills Every 21st-C Teacher Should Know

Skills Every 21st-C Teacher Should Know | Connected educator | Scoop.it
What does it mean to master the 21st century skills every teacher should know? Susan Lucille Davis has answers.

 

Can you conduct an effective online search?

Do you pop your topic into your preferred search engine and skim the first page of responses for something that looks good enough – just like our students do?

Do you know how to conduct a “clean” search that doesn’t predict what it thinks you are looking for based on your past searches?

Do you take the time to play with Google Scholar?

Can you narrow your search by date or country?

Can you reverse search a source to find its origin?

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Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

Seven Keys to Effective Feedback | Connected educator | Scoop.it

What is true feedback—and how can it improve learning? I recently read this article in “Educational Leadership Feedback for Learning” by Grant Wiggins. 


There is always a lot of debate going on about classroom instructions and, how students learn and how teachers assess their work. At our school we spend a lot of time scheduling the tests for the school year, and each year both students and teachers complain. Too many tests during too few weeks. The focus on tests that seem to be the drive for how the school year is planned, combined with how many teachers teach,  lectures and instructions, makes me think about how we give feedback and if we are improving learning the way we could. In this article Grant Wiggins writes that research shows that less teaching plus morefeedback is the key to achieving greater learning. And there are numerous ways—through technology, peers, and other teachers—that students can get the feedback they need. I have listed his 7 keys here! Even if formative assessment is a term most teachers are familiar with I wish teachers and school leaders spent more time discussion how to achieve effective feedback. It should be an ongoing discussion in all schools!


 
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Charter School Network Offers Its Own Data System to All Schools

Charter School Network Offers Its Own Data System to All Schools | Connected educator | Scoop.it
As gathering data about student performance becomes a bigger priority in education, schools are faced with different choices on how to capture that data. A slew of tech companies offer a variety of products they’ve developed for schools, but some school districts are creating their own data systems.

 

Teachers can see whether the entire class is struggling on a particular math standard, for example, or whether specific students are falling behind. The idea is to help teachers decide what tack to take with individual students.

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Toward a New System of Education

Toward a New System of Education | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Stephen Downes:
“ We must develop the educational system outside the traditional system because the traditional system is designed to support the position of the wealthy and powerful. What is most important is how education is thought of in such a system.

 

An education is property of a person (‘property’ in the sense of ‘quality’ or ‘attribute’, not in the sense of ‘ownership’ or ‘possession’) just in the same way as health and fitness are properties of a person, something they have all their lives, something they develop and grow and maintain, something they are themselves ultimately responsible for.

 

In this model, the public education system isn’t something you put aside 18 years your life to go to and ‘access’, no more than a child spends the first 18 years of his or her life in a health institution developing strength and fitness.

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Meet Suzie Boss, PLP Live – Inspire. Collaborate. Shift. Keynote Speaker

Meet Suzie Boss, PLP Live – Inspire. Collaborate. Shift. Keynote Speaker | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Powerful Learning Practice is hosting a new type of conference. In this interview meet Suzie Boss, one of the PLP Live keynote speakers.

 

*Active, creative collaboration with educators and educational leaders from across the globe to solve issues from the classroom to policy makers

*Most importantly, shift: why we need it, how to make it happen in your own teaching, your classroom, your school, your local community, how becoming a connected educator accelerates the shift, and how to inspire others to ride the wave of change with you

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What Will You Click On Next? Focusing Our Attention Online

What Will You Click On Next? Focusing Our Attention Online | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Lenny Gonzales The onslaught of information from the wired world can be overwhelming to anyone -- even the savviest online audiences.

 

The onslaught of information from the wired world can be overwhelming to anyone — even the savviest online audiences. But rather than completely shut out the digital world, the smarter solution is to learn how to manage it, says author Howard Rheingold.

In his book Net Smart: How to Thrive Online, Rheingold outlines the potential merits of the vast digital landscape, and offers ideas on how to lasso the unwieldy aspects and use it for good.

In a recent conversation on the Forum talk program, Rheingold stresses the importance of intention when it comes to managing digital noise. Knowing that every click will likely to lead to a chunk of time spent on what follows will help people decide if that’s worthwhile. Every click counts.

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The Thin Value Proposition

The Thin Value Proposition | Connected educator | Scoop.it

A few days ago I listened to two rising seniors in high school welcome back their teachers at an opening day with two very moving, articulate speeches.The value of school they spoke about came directly from the relationships, the encouragement, the patience, the nudging, the inspiration that came from the adults in the room, all of which will serve them to a greater degree than than passing the test.

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Half an Hour: New Forms of Assessment: measuring what you contribute rather than what you collect

Half an Hour: New Forms of Assessment: measuring what you contribute rather than what you collect | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Once again, as we do at the start of every school year, we are hearing about the rampant cheating that goes on, especially online, but in fact, everywhere, and without remorse or regret.

As Nikhil Hoyal writes, "Cheating is an epidemic in schools across the nation. A 2010 survey of 2,000 Stuyvesant students revealed that more than 72 percent of students copied their homework from others and about 90 percent of seniors cheated on tests."

 

In the schools, too, there is no reward for helping others (indeed, it is heavily penalized). Suppose educational achievement was measured at least partially according to how much (and how well) you helped others. The value of the achievement would increase if the person is a stranger (and conversely, decrease to zero if it's just a small clique helping each other) and would be in proportion to the timeliness and utility of the assistance (both of which can be measured).

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A Principal's Reflections: Standardization Will Destroy Our Education System, If It Hasn't Already

A Principal's Reflections: Standardization Will Destroy Our Education System, If It Hasn't Already | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Standardization Will Destroy Our Education System, If It Hasn't Already. Dan Pink reveals that the keys unlocking and sustaining intrinsic motivation are autonomy, mastery, and purpose. As a leader this is the type of teaching and learning culture that I want to foster and cultivate, one where creativity flourishes, students find relevancy and meaning in their learning, and teachers are given the support to be innovative. A teaching and learning culture powered by intrinsic motivation will achieve this.

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Promoting Student Engagement: Choose2Matter: Don’t Underestimate Students

Promoting Student Engagement: Choose2Matter: Don’t Underestimate Students | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Too many people, including educators and students, feel insignificant. But what happens when you know you matter and you understand that your actions count? What happens when you recognize that you are not only important, but essential?

 

@AngelaMaiers poses these questions in advancing the You Matter (#YouMatter) movement.

 

As Angela observes, the You Matter movement both lifts us up and challenges us. We are lifted up by the recognition that each of us is a genius. We are challenged by the assumption that our contributions are needed by the world.

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Is “failure” an option?

Is “failure” an option? | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Just to reiterate…I get why people say that “failure is important to learning”, etc., but does a short sentence with that one little word invoke faith in what our schools are doing? Bill Gates failed. Steve Jobs failed. Tons of other failed. I get that. But schools are a place where all of us went and most didn’t go to school with Bill Gates. Many of them will have stories of the kid who “failed” and continued to “fail” often; that is where many minds will go.

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Leadership 2.0 – Open Course #leadership20 | Connected Principals

Leadership 2.0 – Open Course #leadership20 | Connected Principals | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Starting on October 2nd, I am very pleased to announce that Parkland School Division, in conjunction with the Central Alberta Regional Consortium, will be .holding totally open and free sessions on “Leadership 2.0“. This will explore what school leadership looks like in the context of today’s world and how innovative leaders are pushing their schools and organizations forward. The course will be based on the Alberta Principal Quality Standards but these standards are applicable to the success of a school leader anywhere in the world and usually align with most organizational standards.

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What the Web Does and Does Not Scale

What the Web Does and Does Not Scale | Connected educator | Scoop.it

George Siemens writing in a new blog that he’s sharing with Dave Cormier and Bonnie Stewart as they craft a new book about the future of higher education:
“ Our thesis with xEducation is that the internet is happening to higher education and that successful universities of the future will be those that find ways to generate value for its many stakeholders that go beyond content provision and teaching.

 

If our focus is not in developing learners through the face to face nudging, modeling, questioning, feedback that stems from our human selves, that stuff that technology, to date at least, has not been able to provide, then I think we run the risk of irrelevance.

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Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform : NPR

Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform : NPR | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Teachers' expectations about their students' abilities affect classroom interactions in myriad ways that can impact student performance. Students expected to succeed, for example, get more time to answer questions and more specific feedback.
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What should be my (our) guiding questions? | Dangerously Irrelevant

What should be my (our) guiding questions? | Dangerously Irrelevant | Connected educator | Scoop.it

I believe that guiding questions are important. As our world changes radically and rapidly, we may not have answers (yet) but we can at least try to ask the right questions. Here are some guiding questions that I’ve been bouncing around for my own work with educators, schools, communities, and policymakers [note that they're often very different from the questions that most educational reformers, legislators, and the public are asking right now]:

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What are you doing to make writing real in your classroom?

What are you doing to make writing real in your classroom? | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Are your students writing for you or themselves? Are your students writing for you or for a real audience? Are your students writing because they have to and don’t know or because they want to and have a purpose? Have you thought about what you are doing to make writing real in your classroom?

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A Principal's Reflections: Great Reads for School Leaders

A Principal's Reflections: Great Reads for School Leaders | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Below is my reading list that I highly recommend to all school leaders and any educator for that matter:

Linchpin by Seth Godin

Drive by Daniel Pink

The No Complaining Rule by Jon Gordon

Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelh

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This About Says it All

This About Says it All | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Pasi Sahlberg:
“ Overall, Finland invests 30 times more funds in the professional development of teachers and administrators than in evaluating the performance of students and schools, including testing. 

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Are textbooks an obstacle to learning?

Are textbooks an obstacle to learning? | Connected educator | Scoop.it

In “We Don’t Need No Stink’n Textbooks,” Tom Whitby convincingly argues that textbooks are as obstructive to learning as they are ubiquitous in American classrooms. To truly move beyond these textbooks, teachers must be forced to confront the fundamental question of our craft, which Whitby mentions at the beginning of his article: “What should we teach?”

 

Ideas, skills, habits of mind, and content are the foundation of any class. The instructional strategies, tools, student-teacher relationships, and general environment of a classroom provide its scaffolding. Before we discuss this latter set of issues, we ought to take seriously the former.

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What story will you try on next?

What story will you try on next? | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Reading books

 

In Norway there is a festival where reading books has been called “boking”. Or in English I guess it would be booking! In fact there is a Facebook group you can join.

 

Seems like a fun challenge. That combined with watching the TED video below. How fiction can change reality. Reading and stories can be an escape from real life, a window into another world — but have you ever considered how new fictional experiences might change your perspective on real, everyday life? From Pride and Prejudice to Harry Potter, learn how popular fiction can spark public dialogue and shape culture

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Mapping Media to the Curriculum » What do you want to CREATE today?

Mapping Media to the Curriculum » What do you want to CREATE today? | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Media maps are workflow storyboards for multimedia products. What do you want to create with your students today? (* Items marked with an asterisk are complete or partially complete. A visual version of this index is also available.)

Text

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60 Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom By Category

60 Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom By Category | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Social media offers some great opportunities for learning in the classroom, bringing together the ability to collaborate, access worldwide resources, and find new and interesting… ("60 Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom By Category"
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What's the difference between PBL and Design Thinking? - Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Learning

What's the difference between PBL and Design Thinking? - Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Learning | Connected educator | Scoop.it

A PBL project tends to explore a relatively narrow subject area, with a narrow essential question
In many, if not most PBL, projects I've seen, the project is defined by the essential question(s), which often sound like curricular checkpoints, or which funnel learning down a particular pre-defined path. In many, the groupings of students and their activities are defined (the film crew, the researchers, the presentation-makers, the event organisers).

 

In Design Thinking, the students, not the teacher, write the essential question(s). In Design Thinking, the teacher avoids asking a question at all, and comes up with what we call a generative topic (from David Perkins' work), a curiosity-mongering statement that opens up an area of study, doesn't narrow it down. The questions that come from this investigation are the ones that students will go on to look at in more detail, come with ideas around solving or presenting.

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