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Young people today have lots of experience…...

Young people today have lots of experience…... | Connected educator | Scoop.it
“Young people today have lots of experience… interacting with new technologies, but a lot less so of creating [or] expressing themselves with new technologies. It’s almost as if they can read but...”
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Ubiquitous

Ubiquitous | Connected educator | Scoop.it

[It's not a bad idea to force yourself to unpack what you mean from time to time. I often say, "Technology must be ubiquitous, necessary and invisible." I thought I'd take a little time to explore each item in that triptych. -- Chris]


But when it is ubiquitous, it becomes a part of who we are and how we learn. That is the pathway to helping students understand the world in which they live. When it is ubiquitous, students learn how to put it away when they want to or they need to. When it is ubiquitous, it is no longer special. That is the moment when we stop worrying about integrating technology and start concerning ourselves with learning.

 


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Deep Learning for Students

Deep Learning for Students | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Ron Berger in Edutopia:
“ In all of my years sitting in classrooms as a student, in public schools that were highly regarded, I never once produced anything that resembled authentic work or had value...
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Although I received good grades, I have no work saved from my days in school, because nothing I created was particularly original, important or beautiful.

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Curators Rule the World

Curators Rule the World | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Joe Coleman:
“ We’re now at a point where curators rule the content world, by collectively deciding whether content gets amplified or lost. As a result, quality of content is again starting to win out...
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Like…now that our kids have access to an authentic audience, why don’t we give them all sorts of opportunities to write about the things THEY care about in ways that have a real purpose and meaning in the world. Becoming a great writer starts with developing a passion for writing, something we too often extinguish in schools.

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Learning is the formation of connections | Dangerously Irrelevant

Learning is the formation of connections | Dangerously Irrelevant | Connected educator | Scoop.it
At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of
Ann S. Michaelsen's insight:

the ability to construct and traverse those networks. Knowledge, therefore, is not acquired, as though it were a thing. It is not transmitted, as though it were some type of communication.

What we learn, what we know — these are literally the connections we form between neurons as a result of experience. The brain is composed of 100 billion neurons, and these form some 100 trillion connections and it is these connections that constitute everything we know, everything we believe, everything we imagine. And while it is convenient to talk as though knowledge and beliefs are composed of sentences and concepts that we somehow acquire and store, it is more accurate — and pedagogically more useful — to treat learning as the formation of connections.

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8 Things to Look for in Today’s Classroom

8 Things to Look for in Today’s Classroom | Connected educator | Scoop.it
cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by chrisbb@prodigy.net As I think that leaders should be able to describe what they are looking for in schools I have thought of eight things that I really wa...
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1.  Voice –

2.  Choice – 

3.  Time for Reflection – 

4.  Opportunities for Innovation – 

5.  Critical Thinkers – 

6.  Problem Solvers/Finders – Ewan McIntosh has a brilliant Ted Talk discusses the notion of “problem-based learning” and how it is not beneficial to give students problems that aren’t real.  Instead, he focuses on the idea that students need to be “problem finders”; being able to find some tough challenges and then being able to solve those problems.  

7.  Self-Assessment 

8. Connected Learning –

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Maybe ‘What do you want your students to do?’ is the wrong question | Dangerously Irrelevant

Maybe ‘What do you want your students to do?’ is the wrong question | Dangerously Irrelevant | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Laptops. iPads (or other tablet devices). Chromebooks. Maybe even netbooks or ultrabooks... As more schools and districts move toward 1:1
Ann S. Michaelsen's insight:

Here’s a short list of what most educators want their students to be able to do with a computing device:

Access information on the WebMake and store filesStay organizedRead electronic books, textbooks, magazines, newspapers, etc.Utilize office productivity tools (word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, etc.)Use course management systems (Blackboard, Moodle, Canvas, etc.)Communicate, connect, and share (email, blogs, Twitter, Edmodo, videoconferencing, etc.)Look at and listen to multimedia (music, podcasts, videos, photos, screencasts, etc.)Create and edit multimediaCurate learning resourcesPlay learning games and engage in simulationsParticipate in online coursesUse a variety of other online tools, services, social media, and cloud-based environmentsAnd, perhaps, customize their learning experience with apps
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Five Things That Changed At My School When We Adopted A Competency-Based Model

Five Things That Changed At My School When We Adopted A Competency-Based Model | Connected educator | Scoop.it

“The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The second best time is now.” This ancient Chinese proverb sums up my view on why just three years ago it was time for my school, Sanborn Region. 

 

1. Our school is now structured into small learning communities for all students in grades 9 and 10. There are plans to look at career-path learning communities for grades 11 and 12 in the next couple of years.


2. We all use a common set of grading procedures that are “competency-friendly.” These procedures include language for the use of formative and summative assessments that link to competencies, a requirement that at least 90% of a final grade is based on these summative assessments, the use of reassessments for students who do not score at a proficient level on a summative assessment on their first attempt, and the elimination of the “zero” from our numerical system.


3. We report student progress based on mastery of common course competencies and school-wide expectations for learning.


4. Our grades separate academics and behaviors. Final course grades are now purely based on what it is our students know and are able to do.

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The perfect 4-minute film to start your new year | Daniel Pink

The perfect 4-minute film to start your new year | Daniel Pink | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Check out this amazing short film -- about one man's quest to make a city smile -- which premiered today. If it doesn't make your day, I'll give you your money
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“Google Maps Streetview Player” Is Just What I’ve Been Looking For! | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

“Google Maps Streetview Player” Is Just What I’ve Been Looking For! | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… | Connected educator | Scoop.it
“Google Maps Streetview Player” Is Just What I’ve Been Looking For! -- http://t.co/aWEhGynd
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E-book Reading Jumps; Print Book Reading Declines

E-book Reading Jumps; Print Book Reading Declines | Connected educator | Scoop.it
23% of Americans ages 16 and older read an e-book in the past year, up from 16% the year before. The share who read a print book declined to 67%, from 72%.
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It has to be accurate.

It has to be accurate. | Connected educator | Scoop.it
In addition to the horrible events of the day, what has stuck out to me is some of the irresponsibility of journalists and news organizations around the world that have been “reporting” the events of the day. I threw out the following tweet:

Is it just me, or should we expect journalists to get it right as opposed to share it first? A lot of misinformation out there today.

Accuracy is at the heart of what we do. It is our job to get it first but it is above all our job to get it right. Accuracy, as well as balance, always takes precedence over speed.
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Sometimes it's Hard

Sometimes it's Hard | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Sometimes this inquiry, project-based, student or learner centred, tech embedded, or whatever you may call it, thing can be hard. Sometimes you feel alone.  Sometimes you feel misunderstood.  And the truth is, sometimes you are alone & misunderstood.  Sometimes it’s frustrating to have to explain, again, what it is you’re doing and why you’re doing it. Sometimes you feel ostracized or attacked.  Sometimes it hurts.  Sometimes you cry.

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Moving Forward

Moving Forward | Connected educator | Scoop.it
cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by Pink Sherbet Photography I heard the following phrase, “we need to ‘uncover’ the curriculum” at a conference the other day, and sta...
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I often get the argument about why students need to share online and I ask the same two questions of parents getting relatively the same two answers.

“What do you ask your child when they get home from school?”

“What did you learn today?”

“What do they say?”

“Nothing.”

Then I talk about the possibility of seeing through a blog and now changing the question to, “I saw that you wrote about _____ today. Why don’t you tell me more about it?”  This is a totally different question because of the work that we are doing, that will get a much more meaningful answer.  Parents don’t want to be just involved in schools, but engaged in the process of their child’s learning.  If you can show them how that is possible with real examples, you are more than likely to have them excited about the possibilities and more critically, feeling like a partner in the learning process and sharing their expertise on their child with us.  That is a beautiful thing.

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Seth's Blog: Open, generous and connected

Seth's Blog: Open, generous and connected | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Isn't that what we seek from a co-worker, boss, friend or even a fellow conference attendee? Open to new ideas, leaning forward, exploring the edges, impatient with the status quo... In a hurry to make something worth making.

Generous when given the opportunity (or restless to find the opportunity when not). Focused on giving people dignity, respect and the chance to speak up. Aware that the single most effective way to move forward is to help others move forward as well.

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The Problem with "Personalized Learning"

The Problem with "Personalized Learning" | Connected educator | Scoop.it
James Paul Gee:
“ People who never confront challenge and frustration, who never acquire new styles of learning, and who never face failure squarely may in the end become impoverished humans. They may...
Ann S. Michaelsen's insight:

Success in the 21st century at work and in life requires collaboration, collective intelligence, and smart teams using smart tools. In our fast-changing world, a world that faces many serious crises, being able to cope with challenge, to persist past failure, to learn in new ways, and to adapt one’s skills and style to other team members are all 21st-century skills. Yet new technologies and the Internet allow us to enter our own customized echo chambers and identity niches where we can comfort ourselves with what we are and do not have to confront ourselves with what we can be and, indeed, must become as fellow citizens in a diverse and complex global world. This is particularly dangerous for students.

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The Missing Layer

The Missing Layer | Connected educator | Scoop.it
From Teachers and Policy Makers: Troubling Disconnect in the NY Times:
“ Michael Petrilli, a research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution and a pro-charter education analyst with the...
Ann S. Michaelsen's insight:

But I wonder this: do either of these groups, the reformers that follow Rhee or the practitioners who follow Ravitch, really have enough of a context for modern learning to have a fruitful, relevant discussion even if they were talking to one another?

I ask that really sincerely.

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Here’s to the individual bloggers | Dangerously Irrelevant

Here’s to the individual bloggers | Dangerously Irrelevant | Connected educator | Scoop.it
The Teach100 is an attempt to rank the top education blogs in the world. Most of the ranking system is purportedly objective, with 20% of the
Ann S. Michaelsen's insight:

Mixed in with them, however, are Richard Byrne and David Warlick, former teachers who are now tireless advocates for powerful learning with technology. Larry Ferlazzo, who teaches ESL students in California. Vicki Davis, middle school teacher in Georgia. Shelly Terrell, international school educator. Eric Sheninger, New Jersey principal. Doug Johnson, the technology and libraries director for the Mankato school district in Minnesota. Jose Vilson, New York City math teacher (and the coolest educator I know virtually). And, yes, even a few university professors like Bruce Baker, Tom Whitby, and Jackie Gerstein.

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Educon 2.5-ish Random-ish Reflections

Educon 2.5-ish Random-ish Reflections | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Just some quick reflections on this year’s most excellent EduCon 2.5 at SLA in Philly, an event I love for the conversations but also for the chance to catch up with a whole bunch of amazing educator...
Ann S. Michaelsen's insight:

But it’s not just learning. More and more I’m coming around to the idea that not only will my kids learning be “self-organized” or “self-designed,” so will the work that they do in their adult lives. And so will the education they cobble together for themselves to get to those work opportunities. When we have access to all that we do now, we can’t wait for someone else to do any of this for us. Or, at least, that can’t be our only option.

So, I’m wondering, are we preparing students for a “self-organized” world?

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In an open access world, are you giving back or just taking? | Dangerously Irrelevant

In an open access world, are you giving back or just taking? | Dangerously Irrelevant | Connected educator | Scoop.it

The same movement that we are seeing toward open educational resources in higher education also is permeating P-12. Many educators have happily tapped into the incredible learning opportunities that are available to them and their students. Our ability to be powerful learners has never been greater.


One of the best things that we can do to improve our local and virtual learning communities is to take seriously our ability and obligations to be contributors to our shared global information commons. We should do this ourselves as educators and we should have our students do this too.

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Born To Be Taught?

Born To Be Taught? | Connected educator | Scoop.it

Chad Sansing:
“ Kids have to own learning. To hold on to it, to connect it, to love it and launch from it – they do. Learning without love isn’t learning; it’s production. It’s not freedom;  it’s indenture. It’s not an awakening; it’s a sedation.

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The Tyranny of Homework: 20 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Assign Homework Over The Holidays

The Tyranny of Homework: 20 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Assign Homework Over The Holidays | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Ann S. Michaelsen's insight:

Students are learning all the time in the 21st century. According to a recent article in MindShift traditional homework will become obsolete in the next decade.  Thanks to computers, learning is occurring 24/7.  With access to software programs, worldwide connections, and learning websites such as the Khan Academy, learning occurs all the time. According to Mindshift, “the next decade is going to see the traditional temporal boundaries between home and school disappear.”  Try to see if you can bridge the gap between school and home by getting students interested in doing their own research over holiday break.  Rather than assigning homework, create a true interest in learning.  They will often pursue learning about topics they like on their own.  After all, this is the way of the 21st century and information is everywhere. 

Read more: http://newsroom.opencolleges.edu.au/features/the-tyranny-of-homework-20-reasons-why-you-shouldnt-assign-homework-over-the-holidays/#ixzz2GoNYdwAD

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Top 10 Posts of 2012: Deep, Meaningful and Creative Learning

Top 10 Posts of 2012: Deep, Meaningful and Creative Learning | Connected educator | Scoop.it
Flickr: CriCristina It may come as no surprise that the ideas that are top-of-mind for educators, parents, and policymakers are the very topics conveyed in the most popular MindShift posts this year....
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The Need for Innovative Leadership | Connected Principals

I asked the following question today on Twitter: If the mandate is for innovation, how much should best practice drive that? This question has been stuck in my head from while I have been reading the book, “Humanize“, which has really challenged and pushed my own thinking on “innovation” and how the culture of social media should be a culture that is embedded into our organizations.


So if we “like it” so much, why are many organizations struggling to import so many of these ideas into their everyday operations?  Many talk of the notion of transparency, yet is the process transparent or simply the products that we share?  As Clay Shirky discusses, we live in a “publish, then filter” world, yet are we comfortable sharing our ideas as they progress?  

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