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Conformable Contacts
Notes from the intersection of faith, reason and geology
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Geology and culture: Adventurer and philosopher Doug Ammons to present at Ravalli County Museum

Geology and culture: Adventurer and philosopher Doug Ammons to present at Ravalli County Museum | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

A philosopher kayaker.  Sample::

 

“'Adventure is the philosophy. Insight is the goal.'

 

Ammons contends that adventure sports put participants directly in contact with the powers that have shaped the world, providing a “tactile understanding of geology in action.”

 

'Usually if you got in the way of such a thing – an earthquake, volcano, or flood – it would simply kill you.' Humans, he says, cannot exist at the flashpoint of major geological changes.

 

Adventure sports like kayaking, in contrast, are a dance with nature, and allow a kind of intimate relationship with that power, depending on one’s skills, potentially allowing a deeper understanding.

 

'It puts a human face on geological change,' he says."

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What Is Unique About the Colorado River?

What Is Unique About the Colorado River? | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
If evolutionists believe that the Grand Canyon was formed by the Colorado River, why don’t rivers like the Mississippi, Missouri or the Ohio also have some form of canyon?

 

Andrew Snelling is a PhD geologist with industry experience, and one of the best proponents of the YEC position, in my opinion, although I am not personally convinced about his and others' theories of runaway subduction of continental plates. This article gives a good answer to the question of geomorphic differences between different watersheds.    

 

Image credit: http://photos.tetto.org/3684/

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The Adirondack Mountains of New York State: Part I – What's so unique about their geology?

The Adirondack Mountains of New York State: Part I – What's so unique about their geology? | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

A beautiful post.  This guy is good.

 

Interesting comment about the Adirondacks:

 

"The Adirondacks ARE indeed ancient; however, they are NOT old mountains but NEW (geologically speaking). They’re actually some of the youngest on Earth, and according to some accounts, they’re still rising! They are, therefore, 'new mountains from old rocks.'"

 

In the Flood model, they would have been uplifted during a worldwide marine transgression, and the current drainage network established during emergence from inundation. I would argue from the lack of water gaps, which occur both to the east and the south, that this mountain range would have been uplifted in the very late stages of recession, possibly even after the majority of water had drained away.

 

It may be argued from topographical analysis that the Mohawk River, a major tributary of the Hudson, which enters into the Hudson just south of the Adirondacks, lies in a glacial through-valley, the erosional remnant of a glacier which flowed from the Great Lakes to the Hudson Valley.  If you color in between the 240-320m contours on a topographic map, you can see this through-valley.  The fact that the Mohawk River now flows to the east instead of to the Great Lakes is probably because of the uplift of the once-glaciated Lakes area after the weight of the glacier was removed.

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Wading into the L.A. River's Braided Past

Wading into the L.A. River's Braided Past | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

Interesting article on the Los Angeles River.  The photo shows a six-inch waterfall that the river is making as it slowly undercuts the seam between two concrete slabs.

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