Conformable Contacts
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Conformable Contacts
Notes from the intersection of faith, reason and geology
Curated by YEC Geo
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Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er! | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:
Love geomorphology comics.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 3:27 PM

This is brilliant.  I can't say how much I love this. 

 

Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, landscape, funart.

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Why Do Rivers Curve?


Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, December 7, 2014 4:27 PM

A very siual form using simple language to explain the meandering of rivers. Applicable to the course work on Hydrosphere.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, physical, infographic.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:14 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 6, 2015 10:05 PM

Excellent infographic for showing Earthquakes :)

Jason Nemecek's curator insight, March 2, 2:00 PM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)

 

GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

My favorite is the slot through the Olga mountains in Australia--how does that happen?

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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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Lament of the geomorphologist (semi-technical)

I've been reading this 1995 paper by the ever-erudite Australian geomorphologist C.R.Twidale, in which he discusses the loss of status of his field of specialization within the greater sphere of geology.  Geomorphology originated as the study of landscapes, and was very observation-driven in the early years, but currently appears to have become dominated by model-driven process theory.  Clifford Ollier, a fellow Australian, restates this another way in his discussion on the origin of mountains:

 

"Unfortunately those wrestling with these problems usually ignore the directly observable evidence of the ground surface. The greatest weight is given to obscure geophysical evidence, while the most obvious and readily available evidence, the topography, is ignored. Yet, as Petriovsky (1985) expressed it: 'The study of the relief of the earth is much easier and cheaper than the study of the earth's depths and uses direct observation.' Ideas about mountain building have been subject to fads throughout the history of earth science. The shrinking earth, geosynclines, and latterly plate tectonics have all provided 'answers,' usually flawed by the scientific fallacy of a single cause, and biased by selective evidence and the rule of dogma. Gansser (1991) wrote, 'During the classical exploration in the 19th and early 20th centuries, the ratio between facts and theories was 1:0.5. Plate tectonics changed it to 1:3 and with geophysics, geochemistry and structural analysis the ratio became 1:5.' I suspect that with the dominance of modeliing it is now 1:10. It would be nice to reverse this sorry state of affairs. This paper is an appeal to geomorphologists to start from their own factual information in the study of major landforms, rather than foliow simplistic theories derived from other sources." (http://www.glaciologia.it/wp-content/uploads/Supplementi/FullText/SGFDQ_III_3_FullText/3_SGFDQ_III_3_1999_Ollier_49_60.pdf)

 

Amen.

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The memory of a river

The memory of a river | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"If you measure the contours of a river valley with Lidar (like radar with lasers), you get a beautiful map of all the historical river channels."


Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

Very impressive.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 29, 2015 6:39 PM

This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Here's a meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

 

Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 12:04 PM

This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Here's a meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 29, 3:42 AM

For the beauty of this picture. Follow the link to see the ancient courses of Mississippi River, I had once the idea to draw maps of the lower course of the Loue River in France not in a scientific purpose, but just for a kind of fractal art.

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


Via Seth Dixon
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Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"The edge of the 4,000 square foot residence on Overlook Court was dangling about 75 feet above the rocky shoreline of Lake Whitney after part it it had already broken off."


Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

In the lower map, the location of the house is marked by a yellow pushpin inside the solid red square.  Some geological background--this poor house has the misfortune to apparently lie directly upon the contact between two carbonate formations (marked by the white dotted line), and to also be on the erosive edge of a bend in the river. Both factors probably contributed to the demise of this particular home, which was eventually set on fire: https://tinyurl.com/nw7mfd2

 

 

One thing to notice is how straight the cliff edge is upon which the house is built.  Knowing that, I'd have to say that if I had a house located on the straight cliff edges within the dotted red squares I've made on the map, I'd be worried.

 

You can read about the geology of Texas here:

https://tinyurl.com/lrcp9yj

 

Image credit here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/House-on-Lake-Whitney-Cliff-Falling-Into-Lake-262718721.html?partner=nbcnews

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 12, 2014 11:59 AM

Just because we build retaining walls, fences, storm drains and other features, it doesn't mean that erosion will stop being a major and consistent force shaping the landscape.   I don't think they got their money's worth on there environmental impact statement, but I'm sure the real estate agent really sold them on the beautiful view.  For more local news on this home, read and watch here, for stunning images, see here.     


Questions to Ponder: Why do we build homes where we do?  How is this different across cultures (hint-Brazil)?


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.


Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 13, 2014 10:00 PM

Natural hazards

Massimo Di Duca's curator insight, June 15, 2014 12:13 PM

E la prospezione geologica da presentare al Comune? Era prevista nel PRG del comune? Esisteva un VIA?

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Gravity...

Gravity... | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"The video clip shows the cliff where the fall initiated, near the ledge close to the skyline.  Then, below the ledge, you can see the talus cone, which are rocky bits along the slope. The really large boulders that fell down and ruined the house have carved out soil ruts as the boulders rolled downhill." http://geographyeducation.org/2014/01/30/gravity/


Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

Gravity-induced erosion in action.

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, January 31, 2014 7:18 AM

Una decina di giorni fa, il 21 gennaio 2014, è franato un torrione di roccia posto sopra un'abitazione a Termeno (Tramin), in Alto Adige.

 

Devastati campi, attrezzature, vigneti - a Tramin si produce i famoso Traminer - e tanta paura per la famiglia del sig. Herbert Trebo che ha visto uno dei massi fermarsi a pochi metri dalla casa. 

 

Qui trovate un filmato che riprende dall'alto la zona, evidenziando la zona del distacco e gli effetti devastanti dei massi rotolati e del terreno franato.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:04 PM

Gravity

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:13 PM

There are some things that just cannot be avoided like this rock that gouged its way down a hill, destroying part of a home and the landscape. Will we ever be in time to predict their coming and avoid such disasters from happening?

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Written In Stone...seen through my lens: Hiking Mount Humphreys of the San Francisco Peaks in Northern Arizona: Part I - Geologic History

Written In Stone...seen through my lens: Hiking Mount Humphreys of the San Francisco Peaks in Northern Arizona: Part I - Geologic History | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

Lovely photographs and clear, well laid-out interpretation--I'm impressed.  This is geoblogging at its best.

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