Conformable Contacts
Follow
Find tag "geomorphology"
2.7K views | +6 today
Conformable Contacts
Notes from the intersection of faith, reason and geology
Curated by YEC Geo
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by YEC Geo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"The edge of the 4,000 square foot residence on Overlook Court was dangling about 75 feet above the rocky shoreline of Lake Whitney after part it it had already broken off."


Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

In the lower map, the location of the house is marked by a yellow pushpin inside the solid red square.  Some geological background--this poor house has the misfortune to apparently lie directly upon the contact between two carbonate formations (marked by the white dotted line), and to also be on the erosive edge of a bend in the river. Both factors probably contributed to the demise of this particular home, which was eventually set on fire: https://tinyurl.com/nw7mfd2

 

 

One thing to notice is how straight the cliff edge is upon which the house is built.  Knowing that, I'd have to say that if I had a house located on the straight cliff edges within the dotted red squares I've made on the map, I'd be worried.

 

You can read about the geology of Texas here:

https://tinyurl.com/lrcp9yj

 

Image credit here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/House-on-Lake-Whitney-Cliff-Falling-Into-Lake-262718721.html?partner=nbcnews

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 12, 11:59 AM

Just because we build retaining walls, fences, storm drains and other features, it doesn't mean that erosion will stop being a major and consistent force shaping the landscape.   I don't think they got their money's worth on there environmental impact statement, but I'm sure the real estate agent really sold them on the beautiful view.  For more local news on this home, read and watch here, for stunning images, see here.     


Questions to Ponder: Why do we build homes where we do?  How is this different across cultures (hint-Brazil)?


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.


Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 13, 10:00 PM

Natural hazards

Massimo Di Duca's curator insight, June 15, 12:13 PM

E la prospezione geologica da presentare al Comune? Era prevista nel PRG del comune? Esisteva un VIA?

Rescooped by YEC Geo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gravity...

Gravity... | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"The video clip shows the cliff where the fall initiated, near the ledge close to the skyline.  Then, below the ledge, you can see the talus cone, which are rocky bits along the slope. The really large boulders that fell down and ruined the house have carved out soil ruts as the boulders rolled downhill." http://geographyeducation.org/2014/01/30/gravity/


Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

Gravity-induced erosion in action.

more...
Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, January 31, 7:18 AM

Una decina di giorni fa, il 21 gennaio 2014, è franato un torrione di roccia posto sopra un'abitazione a Termeno (Tramin), in Alto Adige.

 

Devastati campi, attrezzature, vigneti - a Tramin si produce i famoso Traminer - e tanta paura per la famiglia del sig. Herbert Trebo che ha visto uno dei massi fermarsi a pochi metri dalla casa. 

 

Qui trovate un filmato che riprende dall'alto la zona, evidenziando la zona del distacco e gli effetti devastanti dei massi rotolati e del terreno franato.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 3, 2:04 PM

Gravity

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 3:13 PM

There are some things that just cannot be avoided like this rock that gouged its way down a hill, destroying part of a home and the landscape. Will we ever be in time to predict their coming and avoid such disasters from happening?

Scooped by YEC Geo
Scoop.it!

Written In Stone...seen through my lens: Hiking Mount Humphreys of the San Francisco Peaks in Northern Arizona: Part I - Geologic History

Written In Stone...seen through my lens: Hiking Mount Humphreys of the San Francisco Peaks in Northern Arizona: Part I - Geologic History | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

Lovely photographs and clear, well laid-out interpretation--I'm impressed.  This is geoblogging at its best.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by YEC Geo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

My favorite is the slot through the Olga mountains in Australia--how does that happen?

more...
Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:30 PM

Beautiful images that are a great reminder of the incredible diversity of landscapes and waterways on this fragile planet.

Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

Rescooped by YEC Geo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:05 PM

This shocking video makes me so glad I live where I live, granted we have blizzards but I would definitely take the snow any day over a tsunami or a hurricane. In this video it was like a bad car accident I waanted to stare at the horrific site oof mother nature taking her course but that was just it it was too scary! Can't believe this is normal for some people in the regions that they choose to live in.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Scooped by YEC Geo
Scoop.it!

Lament of the geomorphologist (semi-technical)

I've been reading this 1995 paper by the ever-erudite Australian geomorphologist C.R.Twidale, in which he discusses the loss of status of his field of specialization within the greater sphere of geology.  Geomorphology originated as the study of landscapes, and was very observation-driven in the early years, but currently appears to have become dominated by model-driven process theory.  Clifford Ollier, a fellow Australian, restates this another way in his discussion on the origin of mountains:

 

"Unfortunately those wrestling with these problems usually ignore the directly observable evidence of the ground surface. The greatest weight is given to obscure geophysical evidence, while the most obvious and readily available evidence, the topography, is ignored. Yet, as Petriovsky (1985) expressed it: 'The study of the relief of the earth is much easier and cheaper than the study of the earth's depths and uses direct observation.' Ideas about mountain building have been subject to fads throughout the history of earth science. The shrinking earth, geosynclines, and latterly plate tectonics have all provided 'answers,' usually flawed by the scientific fallacy of a single cause, and biased by selective evidence and the rule of dogma. Gansser (1991) wrote, 'During the classical exploration in the 19th and early 20th centuries, the ratio between facts and theories was 1:0.5. Plate tectonics changed it to 1:3 and with geophysics, geochemistry and structural analysis the ratio became 1:5.' I suspect that with the dominance of modeliing it is now 1:10. It would be nice to reverse this sorry state of affairs. This paper is an appeal to geomorphologists to start from their own factual information in the study of major landforms, rather than foliow simplistic theories derived from other sources." (http://www.glaciologia.it/wp-content/uploads/Supplementi/FullText/SGFDQ_III_3_FullText/3_SGFDQ_III_3_1999_Ollier_49_60.pdf)

 

Amen.

more...
No comment yet.