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African Mountain Range Could be World's Strongest -- and yet...

African Mountain Range Could be World's Strongest -- and yet... | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
African Mountain Range Could be World's Strongest
Yahoo! News (blog)
Table Mountain is made of very pure quartzite, a metamorphic rock that was once sandstone.

Via Catherine Russell
YEC Geo's insight:

The article states that Table Mountain, South Africa, is very resistant to erosion because of its quartzite composition.  However, there are several features in the area that are almost certainly wind gaps, erosional remnants of former stream channels (see for example in the above image).  What kind of energy must those streams have had to erode through such resistant bedrock?

 

One answer might be that the wind gap was eroded when the rocks were still unconsolidated.  Another possibility is that the shear stress of the eroding currents was greater than the critical stress necessary to erode the bedrock.

 

Both possibilities are consistent with the hypothesis of wind and water gaps being formed all over the world as enormous currents receded off an emerging landscape at the end of a catastrophic global marine transgression.

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Conformable Contacts
Notes from the intersection of faith, reason and geology
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Raison d'etre

Raison d'etre | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

In geological terms, a contact is the place where two different types of rocks come together. This ezine is a place to find content from my favorite web sources on the the creation-evolution issue, with a focus on the subject of geology.  Just as the layers of a rock can be composed of many different materials, so my sources often differ in their assumptions and in their views on the issue, but their common intersection is the belief that this is an important subject.

 

(Image source:  Glyn Baker, http://www.geograph.org.uk/reuse.php?id=167895)

YEC Geo's insight:

While my interests are wide-ranging, as even a cursory glance at this site will show,  a subject of great personal interest to me is the preservation of biological material in fossils presumed tens to hundreds of millions of years old.  In my view, the increasing pace of discovery of such material is one of the strongest evidences in support of a young age for the earth.

 

Below is a continuously updated archive of articles I've found on the subject:

 

Jurassic squid ink: http://sco.lt/7nbAVV

550 million year old tube worms: http://sco.lt/8xwAJl, http://sco.lt/4xoX6v

23 million year old lizard:  http://sco.lt/5qDwpt

46 million year old mosquito: http://sco.lt/8AQAuf

46 million year old beetle scales: http://sco.lt/68OHA1

70 million year old hadrosaur skin: http://sco.lt/8SaVEn, http://sco.lt/9L5UDB

160 year old mollusk melanin:  http://sco.lt/6QYbU9

Brian Thomas’ overviews:  http://sco.lt/92v9t3, http://sco.lt/5H0JSj

Archaeopteryx feather:  http://sco.lt/70tG8P

190-197 million year old sauropod egg proteins: http://sco.lt/7J3aSX

250 million year old coloration on trilobites: http://sco.lt/4xixrV

Cretaceous triceratops horn: http://sco.lt/6a9nlZ, http://sco.lt/5FtIBd

Bachelor’s thesis on fossil pigments: http://sco.lt/5mbfv7

350 million year old crinoids & 417 million year old eurypterid chitin: http://sco.lt/5Y3cVl

C-14 in dinosaur bones, a presentation at an AGU-AOGS conference that was later stricken from the conference records:  http://sco.lt/5OIu25

Soft tissue overview from Answers in Genesis: http://sco.lt/666kpl

Dr. Mary Schweitzer’s dinosaur tissue research: http://sco.lt/5VIvnl

Preserved coloration in 70 million year old mammal teeth: http://sco.lt/5H0JSj

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Moon Still Has Hot Core

Moon Still Has Hot Core | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
Japanese scientists have determined that a soft, hot core remains in the center of the moon, contrary to expectations.
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Explore the geysers and waterfalls of Iceland on Google Maps

Explore the geysers and waterfalls of Iceland on Google Maps | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"n his book Tales of Iceland, Stephen Markley wrote, “The problem with driving around Iceland is that you’re basically confronted by a new soul-enriching, breath-taking, life-affirming natural sight every five... minutes. It’s totally exhausting.” We've never been ones to take someone else's word for it when it comes to sightseeing, so we took Street View to some of the most stunning locations throughout the country. As it turns out, Markley was right...and now with Street View, you can take a journey through Iceland to explore these beautiful places too."

YEC Geo's insight:

For some time now, I've thought that Google Maps offers a great way to do virtual geology field trips.  Here's one example.

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Vanishing Taiwan canyon has 50 years left

Vanishing Taiwan canyon has 50 years left | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"All these measurements reveal some of the fastest erosion geologists have ever seen: the gorge is being eaten away from its upstream end at a rate of 17m per year.

 

The breakneck pace is a result of both the relative softness of the rocks, and the regular flooding brought by typhoons."

YEC Geo's insight:

Fascinating, fascinating.  An earthquake uplifted a chunk of the valley floor, causing a natural dam which has been repeatedly swept over by periodic floods  and eroded by the river.  What would happen if the river, for some reason, dried up?  The erosional remnants in the image above  would be left behind.  Kind of like here:  http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a8/La_Fen%C3%AAtre_du_Nord,_Monument_Valley,_AZ..JPG

 

Key point:  it's the flooding that's causing the erosion, not the normal flow of the river.

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Fascinating flower pots

Fascinating flower pots | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"When I descended the steps, I saw that the flower pots were made of gravel that had been cemented into stone. Some of the chunks of rock were angular but most were rounded. This conglomerate rock, as it is called, spoke of large quantities of fast flowing water. Rushing floodwaters would not have taken very much time to deposit that gravel. As I walked across the exposed ocean floor and examined the flower-pot stacks and cliffs, I realised I was looking at evidence from the global Flood of Noah’s time."

YEC Geo's insight:

We just came back from a visit to Hopewell Rocks, so this article was personally pertinent.

 

What the article doesn't mention, which you can see somewhat in the lower left corner of the image above, is that most of the shoreline is roped off to protect visitors from the unstable cliffs.  Jay Wile discusses some articles here noting that one formation which was prominent in 1983 had eroded to a stump by 1998 (http://blog.drwile.com/?p=10614).  The authors of one of the studies he cited estimated that the 16 rock pillars they studied were formed only within the last 96 to 256 years.

 

In other words, there's a lot of fast erosion going on here. 

 

Here's another article by a sea kayaker with some gorgeous pictures of similarly eroded areas in the Bay of Fundy:  http://www.coastaladventures.com/fundyarticle.html. ; Sea kayaking is definitely one of the best ways to tour this area.

 

 

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Pakistan’s glaciers: Data-sharing needed to mitigate disasters

Pakistan’s glaciers: Data-sharing needed to mitigate disasters | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Not just here, but all over Gilgit-Baltistan [region], most [glaciers] are downsizing, retreating in their positions,” said Ali, a researcher at the Karakoram International University. “It could be due to carbon emissions, or shifting monsoon precipitation, or to a natural cycle, maybe an inter-glacial age, or some combination - but it needs to be studied.”


Until recently it has not been. Despite the environmental importance of the area, there are only a handful of climate monitoring stations installed in the Karakoram mountains. In the absence of field measurements, Ali and other local scientists say international researchers are using unreliable data, often not shared with others, to reach conclusions that do not reflect what is being observed on the ground."

YEC Geo's insight:

The people in this area of Pakistan have lived in conjuction with glaciers for centuries.  It would be interesting to mine the tales of local elders for data on the variability of glacier melt and build-up.

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Geology walk at Santubong National Park

Geology walk at Santubong National Park | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Crusts, caramel, nuts in porridge – they sound more like a cooking lesson than a walk to learn about geology. However, these are the striking analogies Hans – a geologist with Shell in his former life – and a dedicated nature lover and photographer, used to explain to us about the ways rocks have behaved over the geological time scale."

 

YEC Geo's insight:

Using "creation," "flood," "geology" and "geoblogging" as keywords results in some quirky articles popping up in Scoopit's suggestion box.  Here's one about a geology field trip in a brand new National Park in Borneo.

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Los Angeles geyser on Sunset Boulevard!

Los Angeles geyser on Sunset Boulevard! | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Back in the 1970's I used to run on the UCLA track near Sunset Boulevard. Two days ago, a 93-year-old water pipe and a 58-year-old pipe broke under Sunset Boulevard near the track, sending a pulsating geyser of water high into the air. ...

The track was flooded, as well as newly renovated ($136 million) Pauley Pavilion, the home of UCLA basketball named in honor of the famous coach of winning teams back in the 1970's. At its peak, the broken pipes were sending 35,000 gallons of water per minute onto the streets, with estimates of 20 million gallons released before the flood was brought under control.

YEC Geo's insight:

Includes link to a video, and explanation of the hydraulics behind this urban geyser.

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Pollock holes ‘eighth wonder’ of the world

Pollock holes ‘eighth wonder’ of the world | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Manuel Di Lucia insists the 320 million year old Pollock Holes in Kilkee, along with Duggerna Reef, is akin to the eight wonder of the world."

YEC Geo's insight:

Eighth wonder of the world?  Maybe not, but still an interesting geo-explore in Ireland.

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Living Near Dams

Living Near Dams | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Our nation’s dams provide drinking water, power, flood control, recreation and many other benefits. But dams can also pose significant risks to people living downstream should they fail.

 

There are dams in every U.S state. It is important that you know if you and your loved ones and property may be affected by the presence of a dam and what to do if you are."

YEC Geo's insight:

There are over 85,000 dams in the United States, and most of them are over 50 years old.  According to the Association of State Dam Safety Officials, in Montana alone there are 2,899 state-regulated dams, of which 105 are classified as high-hazard potential dams. The high-hazard potential classification indicates that a dam may cause loss of life if it were to fail.

 

Also according to the ASDSO, 97 of those 105 dams have an Emergency Action Plan.  That means that eight of those dams don't have one.

 

If you or anyone you know lives downstream of a dam, the e-booklet that can be accessed by clicking on the image above was created to answer questions about how to react if you are affected by a dam.  It has some very interesting information, including which states have the highest concentration of dams, who owns and operates them, and the risks that poorly maintained dams impose upon those living downstream of them.

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Is This "Lost World" Finally Opening For Exploration?

Is This "Lost World" Finally Opening For Exploration? | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"There's a saying in exploration that there are only two ways to make a discovery: Either use advanced technology and techniques in a mature area, or apply basic methods in a new terrain.

 

One of the most interesting "new places" around the world is Madagascar, a nation that enjoyed a rich mining history in colonial times but has seen little in the way of systematic modern exploration since."

 

YEC Geo's insight:

Madagascar starting to re-open up to mineral development.  Good or bad news?  Probably both, as is usually the case.

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How a Sudden Flood of Oil Money Has Transformed North Dakota

How a Sudden Flood of Oil Money Has Transformed North Dakota | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Since retiring five years ago, Fuglie, the former tourism director, has maintained a political blog, and he characterizes state leaders as so giddy with new riches that they've ignored the boom's destructive effects.

 

"We've been so poor for so long, then all of a sudden, we won the goddamn lottery," he said. "You know what happens to lottery winners who aren't prepared to spend a lot of money. You read about them three years later. They're in court, or they're in bankruptcy, or they’re divorced, or their kids committed murder or took drugs. That's the way we are."

 

YEC Geo's insight:

This report is part of a joint project by the "Center for Public Integrity" and "InsideClimate News," so there's no mistaking its bias, but it has some well-made points.

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Flattened mountains, poisoned rivers

Flattened mountains, poisoned rivers | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
China's rapid industrialisation has not been accompanied by a respect for the natural environment - but, as pollution problems become so severe that they can no longer be ignored, engineers are beginning to dream up ambitious solutions to problems created by ambitious modernity.
YEC Geo's insight:

"Performing major surgery on the Earth's crust" is how some Chinese environmentalists describe it.

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Utah's Great Gallery rock art younger than expected, say scientists

Utah's Great Gallery rock art younger than expected, say scientists | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Ancient Barrier Canyon-style paintings crafted on sunset-washed rock faces of the Great Gallery, located in Horseshoe Canyon in southern Utah's Canyonlands National Park, are younger than expected, say Utah State University scientists."

YEC Geo's insight:

A clever mashup of archaeology and stratigraphic reasoning.

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Video shows enormous crack in the ground in northern Mexico

Video shows enormous crack in the ground in northern Mexico | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
Incredible footage has emerged showing a 26ft (8m) deep crack in the in the farmland of northwest Mexico, which stretches for over a kilometre.
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Radioisotope Dating of Meteorites II: The Ordinary and Enstatite

Radioisotope Dating of Meteorites II: The Ordinary and Enstatite | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Meteorites date the earth with a 4.55 ± 0.07 Ga Pb-Pb isochron called the geochron. They appear to consistently yield 4.55-4.57 Ga radioisotope ages, adding to the uniformitarians’ confidence in the radioisotope dating methods."

YEC Geo's insight:

Geologist Andrew Snelling examines in detail the radiometric dating of meteorites and their implications for the creationist model.

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Less shake from artificial quakes, Fed study says

Less shake from artificial quakes, Fed study says | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Man-made earthquakes, a side effect of some high-tech energy drilling, cause less shaking and in general are about 16 times weaker than natural earthquakes with the same magnitude, a new federal study found."

YEC Geo's insight:

Maybe the earthquake equivalent of a controlled burn?

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The KiraVan, an Expedition Vehicle to End All Expedition Vehicles

The KiraVan, an Expedition Vehicle to End All Expedition Vehicles | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Applied Minds is something like a think tank that actually creates things. The "interdisciplinary group of artists, scientists and engineers, with skills in architecture, electronics, mechanics, physics, mathematics, software development, big data analytics, system engineering, and storytelling" has worked on everything from vehicle engineering to cancer treatments to 3D interfaces to algorithms.

 

So it's no surprise that co-founder and inventor Bran Ferren came up with a project as crazy as the KiraVan.The KiraVan is a massive truck that can do, well, everything, both on-road and off. It can scale 45-degree slopes. Its fuel tank can hold 170 gallons of biodiesel that provides a range of 2,000 miles between fill-ups. It stores enough food and water on-board for a crew of three to survive for three weeks between grocery runs, and all the while electricity is coming in from a bank of solar-charged batteries. The truck is engineered to run through both extreme cold and extreme heat. It can deploy its own freaking drones so you can scout ahead before you proceed."

YEC Geo's insight:

Now this is what you want to take along on a geology field trip.

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
YEC Geo's insight:

I love maps, but it's easy to forget that reproducing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface involves many trade-offs.  This article highlights those trade-offs.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, August 14, 11:14 AM

Very interesting article on how map projections potentially effect our view of the world.  

CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, August 14, 2:30 PM

Use as small cards that students can sort in small groups?  Post as gallery walk?  Skill builder to identify areas of distortion (shape, area, distance, etc)?  

HumdeBut's curator insight, August 15, 1:15 AM

bien intéressant !

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Sandstone Arches Get New Explanation

Sandstone Arches Get New Explanation | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
The national park signs may need updating.

 

Natural sandstone arches occur in many parts of the world, most notably in Arches National Park in eastern Utah.  Visitors, upon reading the confident-sounding interpretive signs describing arch formation, might be surprised to learn that the origin of these structures is not fully understood.  In a recent paper in Nature Geoscience, researchers from the Czech Republic who ran some new lab experiments imply that prior theories are incomplete, if not wrong."

YEC Geo's insight:

Very interesting--apparently the similarity between the arches in the park and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis is more than superficial.

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Google Maps Mania: Mapping the Histories

Google Maps Mania: Mapping the Histories | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"Herodotus, the Father of History, was a fifth century Greek historian. The Histories of Herodotus recounts the origins of the Great War between the Greeks and Persians and the rise of the Persian Empire.

The Hestia Project was set-up to carry out geospatial analysis of Herodotus's Histories. Part of that project includes this Herodotus Timemap. The Timemap connects the text of the Histories with a Simile timeline to allow users to visualize geographical references in the Histories on a Google Map."

YEC Geo's insight:

Very cool--you can read the text online while tracking at the same time a timeline and a map.

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Happy Birthday, Colorado River - long may you live!

Happy Birthday, Colorado River - long may you live! | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"When Congress 93 years ago formally renamed the Grand River as the Colorado, it probably didn’t have any inkling about what the mightiest river in the West would be subjected to early in the 21st century."

YEC Geo's insight:

I didn't know the Colorado used to be named the Grand River.  Wonder why it was renamed.

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Soft tissue cutting too close to the bone

Soft tissue cutting too close to the bone | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"In July of last year, [Mark Armitage] published a paper in the peer-reviewed journal Acta Histochemica. In that paper, he reported finding soft tissue in a Triceratops fossil that is supposedly 65 million years old. Remarkably, the soft tissue was composed of tiny, fragile cellular structures which showed no evidence of being mineralized. In addition, there was no doubt that this tissue came from the Triceratops, as it has exactly the microscopic structure one would expect for bone tissue.

 

That was too much for the High Priests of Science. The Inquisition struck, and Armitage was fired from his position at California State University."

YEC Geo's insight:

What happens when you use hard science in a way that severely challenges a dearly-held dogma.  Yes, maybe Mark Armitage was fired for some other reason.  But the timing is suspect, and Armitage is an expert in his field, so it's hard to imagine that there was a problem with his job performance.

 

Here's a link to the abstract of Armitage's article on the soft tissue preservation: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0065128113000020

 

and here is Jay Wile's discussion of it: http://blog.drwile.com/?p=10065

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USGS Wants You to Know: What’s the Deal with 3DEP?

USGS Wants You to Know: What’s the Deal with 3DEP? | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it

"The USGS, along with other federal, state, local and private agencies is establishing a new 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) designed to respond to the growing needs for three-dimensional mapping data of the United States. This coordinated partnership can help meet the country’s needs for high-quality, 3D elevation data."

YEC Geo's insight:

Let's hope the data will continue to be free to the public.  Here's a link to the USGS page on 3DEP: http://nationalmap.gov/3DEP/

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The Messinian salinity crisis questioned

The Messinian salinity crisis questioned | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
All the supposed 'proofs' for the Messinian salinity crisis are considered equivocal or incorrect by some secular researchers.
YEC Geo's insight:

More on the theme of salt.  According to one of the commenters, even secular geologists appear to be looking beyond the traditional evaporitic model for the origin of thick-bedded salt deposits.

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What about oxidizable carbon ratio dating?

What about oxidizable carbon ratio dating? | Conformable Contacts | Scoop.it
Oxidizable carbon ratio dating is not an objective independent dating method and does not provide evidence for long ages.
YEC Geo's insight:

Upshot is that OCR dates need to be calibrated against C-14 dating, so their accuracy is only as good as the underlying C-14 time scale.

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