Confidences Canopéennes
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Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 3:34 PM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Confidences Canopéennes | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:53 PM

The great green wall initiative project, is a project which wants to plant tens of thousands of trees, roughly fifty thousand trees alone in Senegal. The point of this is to restore a failing  environment. Around five hundred million people are living in a desertification area. Both human and nature is at fault for this creation of a transition zone getting bigger and bigger, Humans are not necessarily taking care of the land like it should be taken care of and as for factors of nature such as climate change, drought and not enough rain. There are social impacts that may affect the area too, experts think that improvements in land and economy may help curb terrorism in Mali. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:59 PM

The great green wall is a way of separating the desert from the rain forest in Africa The Sahel is the area that separates the deforestation and the desert and would be a way to keep the desert in a different climatic region of the country.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:40 PM

this a great i think, the only way that countries in an area with such harsh environments can survive is by helping eachother and using their own beneficial land to help other and recieve help for their own deficiencies. 

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Confidences Canopéennes | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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Deborah Jones's curator insight, October 25, 2014 9:58 AM

PSA

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.