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What's Missing From These Quotes? QR Codes Hide the Answers!

What's Missing From These Quotes? QR Codes Hide the Answers! | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
I made a series of posters that I often hang around the room when I facilitate workshops. It's fun for participants to get up and scan them at break time. Each poster features a quote about education or technology .

Via Julie Millan, Naomi Harm, Deb
ElizabethHS's insight:

This looks like a fun way to use students' smartphones. You will need a QR reader/editor to make the codes and students will have to be smartphone-enabled, which is something that may not be far down the road.

[thanks to Scoop from Deb]

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Five Guidelines to Make School Innovation Successful

Five Guidelines to Make School Innovation Successful | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Lessons learned from over 10 years of sustaining a school model that goes against the grain of traditional education.
ElizabethHS's insight:
Five areas that need to be considered in transforming schools:
simplicity, a common language, operations, educational/cultural consistency, and sustainability.
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UKEdMag: The Power of Repetition by @MrPatelsawesome - UKEdChat.com

UKEdMag: The Power of Repetition by @MrPatelsawesome - UKEdChat.com | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Ebbinghaus’ research states learnt material exponentially decays to around 20% within a week. In the context of a lesson this means that pupils will only retain a fifth of the core information week on week. Very alarming, but there is a saving grace within the research.

Ebbinghaus comments on the value of spaced repetition. Here information was repeated at spaced intervals until the information became habitual. This approach has considerable implications when considering revision for tests and examinations.
ElizabethHS's insight:
The idea of a "forgetting curve" is very powerful. One's own experience in learning a second language (or mastering the multiplication tables so you can recall them 50 years later) really backs up Patel's point. We do need repetition to learn. This may be why games and gaming are an aid to retention.
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Evaluating personalization

Outside of ELT, ‘personalization’ has been used to refer to everything from ‘from customized interfaces to adaptive tutors, from student-centered classrooms to learning management systems’ (Bulger, 2016: 3). 


The article continues with several charts and graphs showing how personalized or individualized learning may be interpreted. Gives food for thought on how to individualize or personalize your own approach to teaching/learning.

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Why the Maker Movement matters to educators

The Maker Movement is a technological and creative revolution underway around the world. Fortunately for educators, the Maker Movement overlaps with the natural inclinations of children and the power of learning by doing.
ElizabethHS's insight:
"Makers learn to make stuff by making stuff. Schools often forget this as they endlessly prepare students for something that is going to happen to them next week, next year or in some future career. Students can and should be scientists, artists, engineers and writers today. The affordable and accessible technology of the Maker Movement makes learning by doing a realistic approach for schools.
"The Maker Movement is a child of the Internet. Makers worldwide share design, code and ideas, but making occurs in real life. Makers share their expertise with a global audience. “We” are smarter than “me” should be a lesson for educators. Collaboration on projects of intense personal interest drive the need to share lessons learned, not external incentives like grades."
The Maker Movement is pretty open-ended and could be identified in a number of different ongoing projects on the Internet. Collaboration is an important driver, but I don't think teachers can underestimate the individual student's drive for knowledge at their own pace. Obviously, PBL/CBL would be an important component of making.
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Do Quizzes Improve Student Learning? A Look at the Evidence

Do Quizzes Improve Student Learning? A Look at the Evidence | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Not all of the studies report the same positive results, but if they are viewed collectively, the use of quizzes seems to yield some impressive benefits.
ElizabethHS's insight:
The blog author writes: "I’ve been looking closely at a set of seven studies, which you will find listed at the end of the article. (These studies were randomly selected—no empirical objective here.) Not all of the studies report the same positive results, but if they are viewed collectively, the use of quizzes seems to yield some impressive benefits. Students reported they spent more time reading and more time studying between tests, and that they were more motivated to come to class prepared when the course included quizzes. These quizzes also increased student participation, lowered failure rates, improved exam scores, resulted in better overall course grades, and did not lower course evaluations. That all sounds pretty good, doesn’t it?
"But the devil is in the details, as in the specific combination of factors and conditions that produced the results. When I looked closely at this subset, I was amazed at the array of details that could potentially affect whether quizzes improve learning."
The conclusion is that unless your class exactly replicates those in one of the studies, you may have to be cautious in using quizzes.
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Finland's new, weird school 'courses' say a lot about how we teach our kids.

Finland's new, weird school 'courses' say a lot about how we teach our kids. | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"I don't know if you've noticed this, but there is no such job as 'math.'


"There are mathematicians, sure, or engineers, but even math-heavy jobs still need strong foundations in grammar, technology, and history if they want to be successful. So it's a little weird that American schools divide these subjects so heavily, like they are ingredients in a soup.


"Rather than focus on one subject like math, students and teachers sit down and pick a real-world topic that interests them — climate change, for example — which is then dissected from different angles. What's the science behind it? How are nations planning on dealing with it? What literature is there about it? This isn't a replacement for traditional subjects — those are still taught too. Instead, these topic-based studies are their own course and an opportunity to tie a bunch of skills together. The kids learn holistically and use real-world skills (like using technology) to tackle a subject the same way they would as an adult.


"Why does this matter for us? Because while American schools struggle, Finland is literally at the top of the education game....


"Finland hopes a simple change to how students learn math, science, and other topics could help kids prepare for the real world."


Bottom line: Why do we teach all subjects like soup ingredients? Because it's the industrial model of education. Start at the bell (the factory whistle), and sit in rows on the assembly line, and don't individualize. And more kids in class is more cost effective.

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Six Classroom Elements Learned from Zombie Films

Six Classroom Elements Learned from Zombie Films | Computers for Education | Scoop.it


"Zombie films offer a framework for understanding key elements of the learning process, including the need for a hook, collaboration, risk-taking, and more."


This is mostly just for fun, but the elements are reminders of important concepts, like risk-taking, humor, and hope can be for students. Seriously good resources are cited for each key element.

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Technologies That Will Define the Classroom of the Future

Technologies That Will Define the Classroom of the Future | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"What innovative technologies that have recently appeared will soon reside in the future classrooms?"

A little "old" on some of these, e.g., cloud computing, MOOCs. But worth a quick read (ignore the large numbers of errors in English--the ideas are there). I think we haven't yet fully realized how much these changes will mean for education. Are we making a mistake in trying to streamline education? The "cost disease" in education means that teaching is finally where it's at, and we will never get the efficiencies of a factory production line that have been introduced by technology/automation. Education is still a very personal service, and it's difficult to make economies. The cost of education will always outpace the general rise of inflation in GDP.

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Evaluation Within Project-Based Learning

Evaluation Within Project-Based Learning | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"Because PBL is about more than learning content, PBL teachers should investigate and experiment with multi-model strategies for assessing their students' learning skills."


One experience with authentic evaluation starts this article:


"Last year I took a group of students to Cuba to produce documentaries about the island nation's culture and history. The main objective was learning how to produce documentaries, but one of my students learned a much more powerful lesson through the process. After completing her project, she posted it publicly to YouTube and received critical comments from someone living in Cuba. The feedback from an audience member in another country profoundly affected her, making her aware of what she was missing in her piece, and the impact that her work can have on others."


Valuable insights into grading creative projects in PBL.


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How Technology Can Address Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs -

How Technology Can Address Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs - | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

How Thoughtful Technology Integration Can Address Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs by Jackie Gerstein


An interesting article with suggestions for specific tech applications to meet students' needs.


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Can student feedback become a two-way street?

Can student feedback become a two-way street? | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

Students hate assessment and don't understand it. The authors say, "Instead, we need to train students to become effective users of feedback, just as we train them in essay writing and critical thinking. Setting this goal, of course, is much easier than specifying how to achieve it. Recently, we looked for solutions by systematically reviewing the academic literature on students’ engagement with feedback. Our review unearthed an assortment of interventions that academics have described. Some were tried-and-tested teaching practices reappropriated with this purpose in mind, such as self-assessment and peer assessment. Others were rather more innovative, and included new ways of using technology to deliver feedback, workshops for developing “feedback literacy” and portfolios for students to track trends in their feedback over time.

"....Becoming a proficient feedback user requires several skills, not just one. It relies on an ability to accurately judge your own abilities and to recognise your own behavioural and psychological reactions to criticism. It needs an understanding of how the assessment process works, and being able to take the perspective of your assessor. It involves setting achievable goals for the future, and planning how you’re going to meet them. And it depends on being motivated to change, and enthusiastic about doing so.

"Hence, there will never be a single silver bullet for getting students to use their feedback. Instead, the solution will undoubtedly require a many-pronged approach, tackling different parts of the problem in different ways throughout students’ higher education careers. Most importantly, it will require us collectively to create learning environments in which students’ active participation in the feedback process is both expected and valued. To really achieve this goal properly, we need a cultural shift in higher education, moving away from the notion of feedback simply as something we give away to students and towards one that sees it as a two-way street, with shared responsibilities and expectations. This will be complicated in political landscapes, such as that of the UK, where teaching quality is measured against students’ endorsement of statements like “I have received detailed comments on my work.” But the crucial point is that this will be mutually beneficial to academics and students."

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Top Twenty Principles from Psychology for PreK-12 Teaching and Learning

"PRINCIPLE 1 Students’ beliefs or perceptions about intelligence and ability affect their cognitive functioning and learning.
PRINCIPLE 2 What students already know affects their learning.
PRINCIPLE 3 Students’ cognitive development and learning are not limited by general stages of development.
PRINCIPLE 4 Learning is based on context, so generalizing learning to new contexts is not spontaneous but instead needs to be facilitated.
PRINCIPLE 5 Acquiring long-term knowledge and skill is largely dependent on practice.
PRINCIPLE 6 Clear, explanatory, and timely feedback to students is important for learning.
PRINCIPLE 7 Students’ self-regulation assists learning, and self-regulatory skills can be taught.
PRINCIPLE 8 Student creativity can be fostered.
PRINCIPLE 9 Students tend to enjoy learning and perform better when they are more intrinsically than extrinsically motivated to achieve.
PRINCIPLE 10 Students persist in the face of challenging tasks and process information more deeply when they adopt mastery goals rather than performance goals.
PRINCIPLE 11 Teachers’ expectations about their students affect students’ opportunities to learn, their motivation, and their learning outcomes.
PRINCIPLE 12 Setting goals that are short term (proximal), specific, and moderately challenging enhances motivation more than establishing goals that are long term (distal), general, and overly challenging.
PRINCIPLE 13 Learning is situated within multiple social contexts.
PRINCIPLE 14 Interpersonal relationships and communication are critical to both the teaching– learning process and the social-emotional development of students.
PRINCIPLE 15 Emotional well-being influences educational performance, learning, and development.
PRINCIPLE 16 Expectations for classroom conduct and social interaction are learned and can be taught using proven principles of behavior and effective classroom instruction.
PRINCIPLE 17 Effective classroom management is based on (a) setting and communicating high expectations, (b) consistently nurtur- ing positive relationships, and (c) providing a high level of student support.
PRINCIPLE 18 Formative and summative assessments are both important and useful but require different approaches and interpretations.
PRINCIPLE 19 Students’ skills, knowledge, and abilities are best measured with assessment processes grounded in psychological science with well-defined standards for quality and fairness.
PRINCIPLE 20 Making sense of assessment data depends on clear, appropriate, and fair interpretation."
http://www.apa.org/ed/schools/teaching-learning/top-twenty-principles.pdf
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Neil deGrasse Tyson Replies to Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

Neil deGrasse Tyson Replies to Lincoln's Gettysburg Address | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"In 2015, the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson accepted the National Academy of Science's most prestigious award. His acceptance speech makes the argument for ensuring that science plays a big role in policymaking. Inspired by the short and eloquent Gettysburg Address, Dr. Tyson makes his case in just 272 words."

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Opinion: Forget “digital natives.” Here’s how kids are really using the Internet

The different ways that parents are handling their kids’ use of tech is creating three distinct types of tech users, says Alexandra Samuel.
ElizabethHS's insight:
Digital orphans, digital exiles, and digital heirs have different approaches to technology and will create conflicting views of technology in the classroom.
This thoughtful article shows that one size does not fit all.
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On The Lesson Plan: Make Stuff. Fail. Learn While You're At It

On The Lesson Plan: Make Stuff. Fail. Learn While You're At It | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
So it's no surprise that the Maker Movement today is thriving in communities and some schools across America. Making is available to ordinary people who aren't tied to big companies, big defense labs or research universities.

The maker philosophy echoes old ideas espoused by Dewey, Montessori, and even ancient Greek philosophers, as we pointed out recently.

I sat down with Dale Dougherty, one of the founding fathers of the Maker Movement, to talk about his new book Free to Make: How The Maker Movement Is Changing Our Schools, Our Jobs, and Our Minds. Dougherty is founder of Make: magazine and the Maker Faire. Here's our conversation.
ElizabethHS's insight:
An interview with the founder of Make magazine serves as a good introduction to the Maker Movement and why it's important to education.
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Avoiding Assessment Mistakes

The concluding assessment, the final test at the end of the unit send a message to the learner that assessment is the end of the learning process. According to Dylan Wiliam, "It is formative only if the information is used by the learner in making improvements that actually take their own learning forward. That is why to be formative, assessment must include a recipe for future action.” When assessment is only provided at the end of the unit, or the most valued assessment occurs at the end of the unit, it offers no opportunity for adjustment and sends a clear message that learning is not a continuous process.
ElizabethHS's insight:
Excellent points about how and why assessment fails as a tool for teaching/learning, including that formative assessment is crucial; feedback should allow for improvement; it must occur as close to the performance as possible; assessment should be of what really matters, not what is easy to measure; etc.
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20 Tips for a New Trainee Teacher! by @trainingtoteach - UKEdChat.com

20 Tips for a New Trainee Teacher! by @trainingtoteach - UKEdChat.com | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Good ideas here, as usual with UKEdChat.com
ElizabethHS's insight:
Good tips to help improve your teaching -- not just for new teachers, either! Record-keeping, i.e., a journal, of what happens in class can help you find the "why." And keeping a hobby or something outside of your training will keep you human!

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How diplomas based on skill acquisition, not credits earned, could change education - The Hechinger Report

How diplomas based on skill acquisition, not credits earned, could change education - The Hechinger Report | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"By 2021, students graduating from Maine high schools must show they have mastered specific skills to earn a high school diploma. Maine is the first state to pass such a law, though the idea of valuing skills over credits is increasingly popular around the country."


Students take exams to pass different proficiencies. Subjects beyond English, math, science, and social sciences are to be offered in future. Purportedly, exams are not just multiple choice. Students can retake exams or parts of exams to complete the proficiency demonstration.


Unfortunately, local school districts can determine individually what it means to be "proficient," so what students actually know may be a matter of where they live. And teachers are tired of an endless series of "reforms" to education.


However, at schools that instituted the reform, students can get much more individualized attention and can start where they are, rather than repeating a whole class. There is also greater awareness by students of what a specific skill or proficiency really entails.


“We inherited a structure for schooling that was based on time and on philosophical beliefs that learning would be distributed across a bell curve,” Doiron [Diana Doiron, Maine Dept of Ed] said. "To dispense with that structure and allow all students the time they need to complete their work, she said, “is really getting at the heart of what education is supposed to be.”

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Learning by playing, tinkering and making

Learning by playing, tinkering and making | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"The play we were engaged in was the sort of richly purposeful play that requires mental engagement. We were finding and solving problems, learning new tools and developing skills we thought only brilliant technologists possessed. We made mistakes. We made more mistakes and many of our ideas failed and not only the first time. We persisted. We asked questions of each other and by doing so found possible answers. Our instructor knew when to leave us alone, knew when to let us struggle with our problem a little longer and knew when to offer just enough salvation to keep us moving in the right direction."

The author suggests several tools for inspired play for STEMS. I suspect these are rather pricey, but might be purchased through a school district.

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5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Your Unmotivated Students

5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Your Unmotivated Students | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"When I ask teachers what their biggest struggles are, one issue comes up on a regular basis: student motivation. You are able to reach many of your students, but others are unreachable. No matter what you try, they have no interest in learning, no interest in doing quality work, and you are out of ideas."


These 5 questions, with accompanying research suggestions, might help you get out of this bind. One important research finding is that extrinsic motivation may really dampen student enthusiasm for important projects and tasks.

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6 growing trends taking over academic libraries

6 growing trends taking over academic libraries | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"Horizon Report details short-and long-term technologies, trends that will impact academic libraries worldwide in the next 5 years."


These trends are not surprising, but are definitely worth keeping an eye on. Among them, the growing use of the Internet; new areas of scholarly pubication; and contributions by the users themselves. 

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Are girls really better at reading than boys – or are the tests painting a false picture?

Are girls really better at reading than boys – or are the tests painting a false picture? | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

"In reading tests at school, girls tend to be ahead of boys, in all age groups and in all countries. But in young adults, there is suddenly no longer any difference between men’s and womenR…"


Multiple factors in test design, such as fictional vs. factual texts, short vs. longer continuous texts, and in motivation, e.g., perceived immediate value which plays a role in young men's responses to tests -- all these can have a signficant role in test score variability for males vs. females. (Article discusses mainly studies in Norway and northern European countries, but conclusions seem appropriate generally.)

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Learning to learn with a MakerSpace

Learning to learn with a MakerSpace | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
An excellent summary of how the "Maker" movement works in terms of pedagogy, learning processes, and assessment
Article by Nigel Couts.

" Learning to learn with a MakerSpace January 8, 2017 Making, Maker Centred Learning and STEAM fit neatly alongside Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) for many schools. Commonly this approach includes a constructivist view of knowledge and teachers seek to establish conditions which allow students to explore questions and ideas with greater independence than may occur in the traditional classroom. Learning becomes a collaborative partnership between teachers and students with a clear focus on a learner centric approach. These core beliefs are enacted through a combination of scaffolds such as those developed from the research of Harvard’s 'Project Zero’ where cultural forces, thinking routines, and an awareness of habits of mind focus the learner’s efforts on developing positive dispositions for learning while building deep understandings. In such an approach to learning Making becomes a pathway to developing the dispositions required for success in the 21st Century and a way of demonstrating one’s competence within a creative and collaborative environment."
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Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind

Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind | Computers for Education | Scoop.it


"Edutopia blogger Terry Heick provides a quick tour of Costa and Kallick's 16 Habits of Mind, along with suggestions for integrating them as classroom best practices."


Very useful tips and a good synopsis of those useful habits of mindfulness.

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How Clear Expectations Can Inhibit Genuine Thinking in Students

How Clear Expectations Can Inhibit Genuine Thinking in Students | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
"“Order.” “Clarity.” “Predictability.” These were the words students and colleagues used to describe Karen’s classroom and teaching style. The other word that kept coming up was “expectations.” Karen had clear expectations of students. Students knew what to expect in her class. Indeed, these evaluations seemed to hold with my own observations. Karen did have very clear expectations, communicated effectively and upheld relentlessly in an admirable fashion. But somehow these expectations, the clearest manifestation of what Karen’s classroom was like, seemed to be standing in the way of creating a culture of thinking. How could that be? Why would having such clear expectations for students’ behavior and performance inhibit their development as thinkers?"
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