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Training teachers through innovative methodologies based in serious games

Training teachers through innovative methodologies based in serious games | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

When using the SimAULA platform, the teacher in training controls an avatar that interacts with student avatars (controlled automatically by SimAULA) in a virtual classroom, where lessons are taught and a series of situations liable to arise in a face-to-face environment are played out. By way of a specific example, the first version of SimAULA features a simulated biology class in which the teacher avatar has to help student avatars fulfil various learning goals.


Via Nik Peachey
ElizabethHS's insight:

This re-Scoop from Nick Peachey. Looks like an interesting simulation/game.

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Karen Johnson's comment, January 21, 2013 4:08 AM
Thanks Nik, I can see this being useful for all sorts of disciplines not just teaching. If this is really as flexible as is suggested it might replace some work currently done in virtual worlds.
Karen Johnson's curator insight, January 21, 2013 4:12 AM

In the future this could be be very useful for disciplines other than teaching.  I wonder if it will be flexible enough to replace some aspects of what we currently do in virtual worlds.

marenas's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:30 AM

SIMAULA, Formación de profesores a través de metodología basada en juegos

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Students don't know what's best for their own learning

Students don't know what's best for their own learning | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
As it happens, students who rated their current teacher most highly got better marks in their current course but did much worse in later courses. This confirms the fears of educators: students’ evaluations are linked with current grades, but also with students’ failure to learn things they need for the future. So, a student who is happy with their grade and teacher should worry — they may not have learnt that much.

How could students be so wrong about which teachers help them learn the most? Neither the American nor the European researchers were really able to answer that question. They could only speculate about teaching practices and students’ preferences for easy marks. However, educational psychology provides a clear, evidence-based answer — students do not understand what helps them to learn.
ElizabethHS's insight:

This article by Arthur Poropat comes to very interesting conclusions that might effect how you feel about such things as cMOOCs, for instance. If students really don't know what helps them learn, how can we trust them to construct meaning?

 

Food for thought here.

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What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning

What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
What It Is: The process of teaching one’s self, or “Self-directing” through the learning process

Why Do It: Engagement, self-pacing, and free

What You Need: Hardcopy, digital (e.g., learnist), accessibility, content control, location free (mobile learning)

Tips & Tricks: Self-assessment, momentum, planning, variety, projects

Problems & Challenges: Procrastination, laziness, misguidance, lack of motivation, time management

Famous Self-Taughts (Autodidacts): Leonardo Da Vinci, William Blake, Herb Rits (in addition to Virginia Woolf, Mark Twain, John D. Rockefeller, and many others)

Why It’s Especially Relevant In 2013: Modern access to information and formal (e.g., MOOCs and free eLearning sources) and informal (video games and simulations) learning platforms make self-directed learning more accessible–and powerful–than ever before
ElizabethHS's insight:

Short and snappy article on self-directed (mastery) learning. You'll get the idea.

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How I reverse-engineered Google Docs to play back any document's keystrokes « James Somers (jsomers.net)

How I reverse-engineered Google Docs to play back any document's keystrokes « James Somers (jsomers.net) | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
How James Somers reverse-engineered Google Docs to play back any document's keystrokes
ElizabethHS's insight:

While this article does get somewhat technical, it is an amazing tool that might help teachers see where their students are going wrong -- or right -- in drafting a paper.

This guy is a genius.

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How a Small Change Can Boost Your Motivation and Performance

How a Small Change Can Boost Your Motivation and Performance | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
When you’re focused on improving your own skills, rather than on demonstrating them, you’re less likely to get discouraged by obstacles, time pressure, or other unexpected challenges. You’ll believe that you can still improve and do better next time. You’ll have a growth mindset.
ElizabethHS's insight:

An interesting blog article on motivation and our conception of how students learn.

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xMOOC Communities Should Learn From cMOOCs | EDUCAUSE.edu

xMOOC Communities Should Learn From cMOOCs | EDUCAUSE.edu | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
You can also argue that if the massive cohort is structured as a cMOOC, then the xMOOC is really just a collection of shared digital resources. and not a MOOC at all. Perhaps it's a "distributed flip". I wouldn't argue with you there.
ElizabethHS's insight:

This article is interesting because it pre-supposes that the larger, ongoing, perpetual motion machine of the cMOOC (connectivist massive open online course) is a desirable outcome. The MOOC (which has now seemed to migrate to 'xMOOC' as nomenclature, for no apparent reason) is a place to start the conversation, but taking the content/skills into the wider world and continuing the conversation beyond the course perimeters is what makes a cMOOC.

 

Having worked recently with elearning of the CourdacityX variety, I'd like to pursue this idea further as an offshoot of my interest in Communities of Practice (CoPs). A CoP, to blogger M. Caulfield, might indeed be one possible outcome of the MOOC experience, but is it a necessary or needful component of all MOOCs?

 

One feature of the MOOC is impersonalization, but there are tools for students to communicate with each other -- discussion lists -- and tools like peer assessment of written assignments (as opposed to machine-scored tests). However, these forms of communication are kept within the apparatus channels and are not expected to bloom into CoPs beyond the MOOC itself. Even within these channels, few students personalize their communications or respond to the same people more than once in a discussion board, and usually never see the same paper or text from a cohort a second time. People just don't make communities of 10,000+.

 

So possibly, the cMOOC can only emerge from a smaller, non-massive group, as in an elearning course, such as the one I am working with for the University of Oregon, based on the U.S. Department of State. There, teachers are responding to each other in a personalized manner and may even have the opportunity to connect outside of the MOOC, as they are from relatively nearby areas within countries of South America. However, there are only 25 students per section, so one could not say the advantages of large scales pertain. I believe that even within CoPs (whether online or land-based), the average of really active participants at any time is probably about 10 or so. Of course these active participants can change at any time, as the conversation or joint project migrates.

 

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Visible Thinking

Visible Thinking | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Every committed educator wants better learning and more thoughtful students. Visible Thinking is a way of helping to achieve that without a separate ‘thinking skills' course or fixed lessons.
ElizabethHS's insight:

This seems to be a system for engaging the "visual learner" if such exists. But I have always found visual cues of importance, and certainly finding many different avenues to thinking is of significance.

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Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom-Management Tips

Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom-Management Tips | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
In the first of two excerpts from his latest book, teacher and blogger Larry Ferlazzo offers some classroom-management tips that are positive, not punitive.
ElizabethHS's insight:

This is a great set of ideas for behavior management.

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On the Limitations of Experimental Research in Education

On the Limitations of Experimental Research in Education | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
A recent article in Scientific American described how scholars are bringing new rigor to educational research by introducing methods from science and economics. I'm strongly in favor of more rigor ...
ElizabethHS's insight:

Mark Warschauer is spot on in shredding the research described. Is it really possible to create quality quantitative research designs in education (and other social sciences)?

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TESOL Blog | TESOL Blog

TESOL Blog | TESOL Blog | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

The TESOL blog has interesting tips and strategies for the classroom and for online learning.

ElizabethHS's insight:

The TESOL Blog has numerous guest writers, all with interesting ideas on how to keep the class lively. Many tips and strategies relate to online learning/dgitial education.

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Discovering Natural Classrooms: Hybrid Collective Learning Spaces - Hybrid Pedagogy

Discovering Natural Classrooms: Hybrid Collective Learning Spaces - Hybrid Pedagogy | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
I challenge you to discover the natural classrooms of the world. Do not limit yourself, your pedagogy, or your methodology to a single place or process.
ElizabethHS's insight:

"For many, the classroom is an alienating place. There are environmental factors that play into this (and monetary factors that play into these environmental ones). There are stigmas, expectations, and traditions that may interfere with learning. In attending and visiting various college campuses around the country I frequently see the same colorless, characterless spaces, each one artificially illuminated by fluorescent light. . . .

More troubling, however, are the less visible cultural biases that manifest in these traditional classroom spaces. When left unmodified, the “default settings” and practices of today’s classrooms may be further marginalizing diverse student populations. One scholar, Mildred Jordan, observes a variety of “negative affects that a mainstream American educational experience can have on African American and other minority students.”"

An interesting article on aspects of schooling that might bne helped by online courses.

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PBS LearningMedia

PBS LearningMedia | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
PBS Learning Media Home Page
ElizabethHS's insight:

One of the best places to find current pedagogical materials and lesson plans. An award-winning education site. Browse by grade level, subject matter, standards, and past collections.

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4 surprising lessons about education from data collected around the world | TED Blog

4 surprising lessons about education from data collected around the world | TED Blog | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
PISA is a test for school systems around the world—compiling data that can help them improve. Here, some surprising findings of the survey.
ElizabethHS's insight:

"In today’s talk, given at TEDGlobal 2012, Andreas Schleicher introduces us to a test that measures school systems and student achievement in countries across the globe—PISA (the Programme for International Student Assessment), an initiative of the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). PISA not only tests students on their mathematical understanding, reading level and ability to apply learning to new problems, but also looks at what teachers get paid, how long the school day is, what the average class size is and whether quality of education is uniform across schools and social stratifications. It even measures cultural attitudes, like whether people in the country expect all students to achieve or only a small segment of them to. It’s this broad approach to data collection that makes PISA so powerful, says Schleicher."

 

An interesting use of big, global data.

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EDpuzzle

EDpuzzle | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Make any video your lesson

Via Amy Burns
ElizabethHS's insight:

Another of the new tools to make video into interactive lessons. The model is still Q and A, but you could put fairly reflective questions and note-taking advice into the comment/question box.

This is a nice feature that is included in such large education magnets as Coursera, and reminds us that you may be able to create your own online or flipped course using many of the features of a Coursera-like management system without the hassle of going through that system.

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Amy Burns's curator insight, March 23, 12:45 PM

EdPuzzle is an easy to use program that allows you to embed questions, tasks and comments into a video you have uploaded.  The video is now interactive, and you could even create settings that make the students respond before moving on in the lesson.  FREE service, with the most helpful support staff!

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How to post to Google+ by email

How to post to Google+ by email | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Google+ is different things to different people. For some, it's a gallery for displaying artwork or photography. For others, it's a powerful way to promote columns, books and blog posts. For most, it's a wordy Twitter replacement where posts are often followed by the highest quality conversations anywhere.
ElizabethHS's insight:

The one thing I'd like to do is just email a specific circle in my G+ communities without having to open up the G+ page. However, the advice in this article is a bit more of a hack than I'm comfortable with.

 

Why can't G+ communities be more like YahooGroups? (And vice versa?)

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Why some schools are giving letter grades a fail

Why some schools are giving letter grades a fail | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Instead of reporting to parents only two or three times a year, teachers began regularly communicating using an online student portfolio system called Fresh Grade. Ms. Wolfram quickly discovered that her daughter was having difficulty with her writing. “Every day her teacher would snap a photo of her journal or a video of her writing with her phone or iPad,” Ms. Wolfram explains. “I could see exactly where she was struggling, and I could work with my daughter and her teacher to help.”
ElizabethHS's insight:

Using formative assessment makes so much sense. Also, some of the schools reported on in this article were focusing on mastery, rather than performance (as summed up in a single letter grade). Too often, a "narrative" or description is substituted for a letter grade, but the effect is of course the same, and the narrative is easily translatable into...a letter grade.

Instead, schools could use formative assessment, a running commentary, created by the students themselves, that reflects on what they are learning and why and how.

Fresh Grade may be worth exploring as a means to making the process easier for teachers, to help them (and students) use and understand formative assessment and mastery learning.

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Active Learning Leads to Higher Grades and Fewer Failing Students in Science, Math, and Engineering | WIRED

Active Learning Leads to Higher Grades and Fewer Failing Students in Science, Math, and Engineering | WIRED | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Think back to when you learned how to ride a bike. You probably didn’t master this skill by listening to a series of riveting lectures on bike riding. Instead, you tried it out for yourself, made mistakes, fell down a few times, picked yourself back up, and tried again. When mastering an activity, there’s no…
ElizabethHS's insight:

Is this something we didn't know?!?

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xMOOC vs. cMOOC - MOOC Pedagogy - Degree of Freedom

I recently learned that I've not been enrolled in MOOC classes at all but have instead been involved with something called an xMOOC (distinct from a cMOOC)
ElizabethHS's insight:

This post raises some interesting questions about where MOOCs are going and how the experimentation with them may change education. (Caveat: the user doesn't seem to have been enrolled in or taught a MOOC of either kind yet.)

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Mobile devices in EFL: What do students think?

Mobile devices in EFL: What do students think? | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
What do EFL learners think about working with mobile devices in the classroom? Does it make them more motivated? Do they participate more in class? Does it improve their English? Is there evidence ...
ElizabethHS's insight:

This is a nice summary of the experiences of Nicky Hockly in using mobile technology with two classes. Includes a survey that you might want to try in your own classroom after doing similar activities. See also the related paper for TIRF at http://www.tirfonline.org/english-in-the-workforce/mobile-assisted-language-learning/designer-learning-the-teacher-as-designer-of-mobile-based-classroom-learning-experiences/

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Book review: ‘Building a Better Teacher,’ on secrets of good teaching by Elizabeth Green

Book review: ‘Building a Better Teacher,’ on secrets of good teaching by Elizabeth Green | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Green argues that teachers are not born but created and the U.S. needs a culture to inspire educators.
ElizabethHS's insight:

Interesting thoughts, by M. S. Roth of the Washington Post, on the relationship between money spent and excellence in teaching. Is great teaching "natural" or a learned behaviors? The discovery of effective strategies to use in classrooms needs to be shared and built upon.

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Observation Exercise: Seeing The Invisible (Uncut)

Observation Exercise: Seeing The Invisible (Uncut) | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

This set of observation exercises includes keen questions to use as you watch, and a way to take notes on what you have learned.

ElizabethHS's insight:

TeachingChannel has recently loaded a set of related videos for teacher training, or self-training, that are uncut classroom sessions. You can watch the video and answer the observation questions as you go along. This is a great activity for a teacher-training class and gives you excellent video and audio quality.

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Guiding Instruction through CFAs

Guiding Instruction through CFAs | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
By using common formative assessments, teachers can customize their lessons and strategies to improve student performance. Watch 7th grade Math teachers as they use CFAs to get the most out of themselves and their students.
ElizabethHS's insight:

This is an excellent example of how principal and teachers work through formative assessments and customization of teaching materials collaboratively. It can happen!

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Are You Ready to Flip? - THE DAILY RIFF - Be Smarter. About Education.

Are You Ready to Flip? - THE DAILY RIFF - Be Smarter. About Education. | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Part 2 of 3 of "The Flipped Class" Series - Guest Posts
ElizabethHS's insight:

Serious ideas about learning, innovation, and technology. The three articles are worth a quick read.

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Real English ESL Videos & Lessons. Real English is a Registered Trademark of The Marzio School.

Real English ESL Videos & Lessons. Real English is a Registered Trademark of The Marzio School. | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
Original ESL videos with interactive lessons. Students of English improve their speaking, listening, reading & writing with our collection of self-grading exercises.
ElizabethHS's insight:

A new lesson set from Mike Marzio. These are excellent, detailed online learning experiences based on videos of real speakers performing authentic activities. Mike interviews people from around the world and then incorporates the video and the script into a variety of grammar and vocabulary lessons.

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Citizens in the Making: Inspiring Students to Engage in Transformative Civic Learning | Connected Learning

Citizens in the Making: Inspiring Students to Engage in Transformative Civic Learning | Connected Learning | Computers for Education | Scoop.it

How can teachers help prepare students for success not only in college and career settings, but in 21st-century civic life as well?

ElizabethHS's insight:

Video of six speakers who work on the issues of student civic involvement. Connected Learning has links to many other webinars and videos on a wide variety of topics.

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Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - 1:1 program, Apple, edchat, EdTech, SAMR, technology

Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - 1:1 program, Apple, edchat, EdTech, SAMR, technology | Computers for Education | Scoop.it
The SAMR model is a useful tool for helping teachers think about their own tech use as they begin to make small shifts in the design and implementation of technology driven learning experiences to achieve the next level.
ElizabethHS's insight:

Nice discussion of ways to use Wikispaces to teach "above the line." Gives good examples of this paradigm for inspiring teaching.

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