Computational Tin...
Follow
Find
1.0K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
onto Computational Tinkering
Scoop.it!

Why a high school computer programming teacher turned down Google - Globe and Mail

Mr. Arkiletian said he prefers to teach students by being a strong role model and providing a challenging environment.

 

“What I’m kind of providing them is a model of the passion and the enthusiasm and the doggedness, the persistence that you have to have to get those high heights, one step at a time.

 

During his 14 years of teaching computer programming at Eric Hamber, many of Mr. Arkiletian’s students have gone on to study computer science in university.

 

Computer science gives you an easy way of helping people around the world,” he said. “If you create something today, it can benefit people tomorrow.”

 

“One thing that was great about his class is he very much encouraged us to go beyond what he was teaching in the class. He encouraged us to start our own projects that were not necessarily directed by him and let us follow our own passions."

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Computational Tinkering
The impact of computational thinking on our view of the world
Curated by Susan Einhorn
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Why the 'coding for all' movement is more than a boutique reform - Washington Post (blog)

Why the 'coding for all' movement is more than a boutique reform - Washington Post (blog) | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it
Think of learning to code as Cursive 2.0.

 

...why have we committed our research to increasing access to computer science for all students? How do we answer Cuban’s call to caution against the fast rush, promoted lately by Silicon Valley interests, to teach all students coding? And how do we see the “computer science for all” movement positively impacting teaching and learning in the schools? Will it bring more progressive education into the schools despite much of its driving force being the creation of more jobs for the tech industry?

 

We have one answer to all these questions: Computer science can help interrupt the cycle of inequality that has determined who has access to this type of high-status knowledge in our schools. Just as public education is crucial for promoting reading and writing, it is equally important for introducing students to the fundamental concepts of computer science. Computer science drives innovation across all fields, from the sciences to the arts—across all careers, from medical assistants to auto mechanics. Students who have this knowledge have a jump-start in access to these careers, and they have insight into the nature of innovation that is changing how we communicate, learn, recreate, and conduct democracy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Web-Era Trade Schools, Feeding a Need for Code

Web-Era Trade Schools, Feeding a Need for Code | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it
Dozens of the schools have sprung up around the country to teach computer programming, offering students a fast-paced curriculum and the promise of jobs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Computational Thinking as a National Capability

Computational Thinking as a National Capability | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

 With the increasing digitisation of our environment and reliance on the Internet, coding and computational thinking will be the new, important skills in the 21st century. Computational thinking is an approach to solving problems, building systems and understanding human behaviour that draws on the power and limits of computing. As coding is the language of computational thinking, learning to read and write this language may become as important as literacy in the more traditional language forms. Coding and computational thinking should be taught to all Singaporeans and made a national capability. This will enable our workforce, regardless of field or profession, to have the necessary skills to benefit from opportunities in the future.

more...
Paul Herring's curator insight, October 2, 4:11 AM

Singapore getting serious

Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Purpose is the key to Computer Programming

Teachers are often called upon to answer this question about an academic subject, and computer science instructors may face this demand more frequently than most. Learning to write lines of code can seem, to many students, like a pointless exercise in tedium.

But a few professors of computer science have a compelling reply at the ready. They are participants in the Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software project, known asHFOSS—or, more grandly, Software for Humanity. Why does this matter? these professors might respond. Because it’s helping to feed needy people in Haiti, or to deliver supplies to earthquake survivors in China, or to manage the medical care of malaria victims in Rwanda.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

‘Submissive Students Do Not Make Good Computer Scientists’

‘Submissive Students Do Not Make Good Computer Scientists’ | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

I am a computer science professor, a discipline that loves to “disrupt.” Yet many companies and tech CEOs support these schools, monetarily and through public statements of support. These schools are the opposite of disruptive and do not teach students the learning skills we need them to have. There are more tech jobs than qualified graduates each year. And we need well prepared students.

Submissive students do not make good computer scientists. We need problem solvers who think outside the box and move technology forward. We especially need such skills from outside our existing very white community to drive tech forward in a more inclusive, useful way.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Kids coding at school: 'When you learn computing, you're thinking about thinking'

Kids coding at school: 'When you learn computing, you're thinking about thinking' | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it
“To me, the basic idea of computing is you have to get a computer to solve a problem: you have to come up with an algorithm, a set of instructions. If you can do that, it’s a hugely valuable skill whenever you’re working as a team for any kind of project,” he says.

“Also, think about other subjects. When you learn physics, you think about physics. But when you learn computing, you’re thinking about thinking. About how thinking works. You have to try to imagine how this computer is going to do something for you. There are lots of transferable skills.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Einhorn from COMPUTATIONAL THINKING IN K-12
Scoop.it!

Seymour Papert - YouTube

A wonderful clip made for television of Seymour Papert's early work on using computers to spark childrens' imaginations. Seymour Papert was the man behind th...

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Coding on campus and beyond - McGill Daily

Though it may be true that we are moving toward a society where computer science knowledge will be as integrated as math and English in the primary school system, coding literacy is even more important for university undergraduates as they prepare for the competitive, technologically advanced, and evolving job market. It’s difficult for students to make sense of the hype around computer science, programming, and ‘hacking.’ Long-standing barriers between technical and non-technical folks create misunderstandings that conceal the true breadth of technology and its essential applications across all academic fields. University students should be encouraged to harness the potential of programming to expand opportunities in their fields.


Even beyond practical usage, coding provides an alternate way of thinking. Employing logic through the mind of a computer forces rationality, brevity, and accuracy. Strong leaders harness interdisciplinary critical thinking by considering problems from within different mindsets (creative, mathematical, emotional, etectera) to form an optimized solution.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Two thirds of parents 'don't know what an algorithm is' - Telegraph.co.uk

Two thirds of parents 'don't know what an algorithm is' - Telegraph.co.uk | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

When tested against the new computing curriculum, a quarter of parents admitted they didn’t think they could complete tasks expected of five year-olds.

 

The updated curriculum, now taught to children as young as five, has been designed to equip the next generation with essential skills to succeed in the digital age.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Bridging the digital divide with computational thinking

Bridging the digital divide with computational thinking | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

 Google, Apple and Facebook recently published diversity data about its workforce, and the results are clear: Technology has a diversity problem!

 

Most high schools are not prepared for the complexity and nuances of teaching computer science. Schools must invest in professional development, curriculum and hardware. Then, CS curriculums become obsolete in a few years.

 

Changing cultural attitudes about computer science may be even a greater challenge. Until we view computational thinking as a core discipline, part of a rounded education, rather than a niche field, we will not make the changes needed to modernize our educational system.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

If A Computer Can Diagnose Cancer, Will Doctors Become Obsolete? - FiveThirtyEight (blog)

If A Computer Can Diagnose Cancer, Will Doctors Become Obsolete? - FiveThirtyEight (blog) | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

Quickly advancing technologies like the C-Path raise all sorts of questions for economists about the future of the U.S. workforce. Labor economists have long expected computers to displace workers who perform routine tasks — for example, file clerks, cashiers and bank tellers — but these days, economists are in a debate with techno-optimists over whether technology will also displace higher-skilled, professional jobs, such as doctors, lawyers and (yes) writers.

 

But even if the tech enthusiasts’ wildest dreams come true, Autor said he believes computers won’t replace highly skilled workers, they’ll just enhance the job these workers do. The more likely scenario, as his paper lays out, is that other jobs will be created, and with them the need for different skills.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Programming != Computer Science

For most students, computer science means lots of high-level coding, screens with black backgrounds and green text, and an esoteric subject. When students hear the term computer science, many think...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Algorithmic Composition: Computational Thinking in Music

Algorithmic Composition: Computational Thinking in Music | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it
The composer still composes but also gets to take a programming-enabled journey of musical discovery.

 

Non-specialists may be disappointed that composition includes seemingly arbitrary, uninspired formal methods and calculation.c What we shall see here is that calculation has been part of the Western composition tradition for at least 1,000 years, This article outlines the history of algorithmic composition from the pre- and post-digital computer age, concentrating, but not exclusively, on how it developed out of the avant-garde Western classical tradition in the second half of the 20th century. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

How to Grab and Keep Girls’ Interest in Computer Coding

How to Grab and Keep Girls’ Interest in Computer Coding | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it
There's growing and well-founded concern about the gender gap in science, technology, engineering and math fields, particularly when it comes to women of color. Here are some ideas on what to do about it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

New Learning Times : Article The Importance Of Tinkering

New Learning Times : Article The Importance Of Tinkering | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

Study Design: Learning to code has gained new momentum in recent years with the proliferation of innovative and easily accessible online resources. However, little is known about how novice programmers learn to program. The authors wanted to explore this topic and focused on one specific learning activity, tinkering, that has been theorized by scholars as a crucial activity for beginning programmers. It has historically been difficult to capture data on tinkering activities because they are, by definition, very subtle and incremental shifts in behavior that might not follow an established pattern.

more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 2, 7:39 PM

Tinkering suggests working with what is there, keeping what works, and changing what needs changing.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Paul Herring's curator insight, October 2, 8:00 PM

"This paper provides strong empirical evidence of the importance of tinkering for learning"

Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Computational Thinking and Archives

Computational Thinking and Archives | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

Yesterday, I was part of a panel with two brilliant colleagues (and a really great moderator) about computational thinking and problem solving in a library context. The room was packed, and I found the discussion rejuvenating — I’ll do my best to capture some lightening in a bottle

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Computational Thinking and Me: Don’t thank me, thank the algorithm | Primary School Computing

Computational Thinking and Me: Don’t thank me, thank the algorithm | Primary School Computing | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

If you had asked me a few months ago what “computational thinking” was, I would have been stumped.  It was not something I ever thought about and I certainly didn’t think it had anything to do with the new computing curriculum.  Furthermore, I never realised how essential computational thinking was in my own life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Computing Science in Primary Education Phil Bagge @baggiepr: Computational Thinking in the Primary Computing Curriculum

The opening statement of the introductory paragraph of the 2014 computing national curriculum11 says, “A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world.” This is a wonderful opening statement which highlights the importance of computational thinking. I also like the way it highlights that computer science is both a science and an engineering discipline. Understanding the world is a scientific endeavour and changing it is an engineering one. Computer science doesn’t just think about things it turns this thinking into digital artefacts to be tested and evaluated by society.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Political computational thinking: cross-sector policy networks in the construction of 'learning to code' in the computing curriculum

‘Learning to code’ has become a major policy agenda in education policy in England. This paper provides a ‘policy network analysis’ tracing the governmental, business and civil society actors now operating in ‘policy networks’ to project learning to code into the reformed National Curriculum programmes of study for Computing.

 

 It can be argued that learning to code is a kind of inculcation into new computational ways of interacting with the world, as channelled through the ‘rules’ of computer science and the disciplinary systems of thought associated with programmers. Such practices are intended to prepare them for a world in which computational thinking and coding practices are seen as potential solutions to all of today’s political and economic problems, with Big Data as the source for those solutions and algorithmic procedures to operationalize them. Through learning to code, young people are being configured in the conduct of coders, with the skills and capacities to write the code to engineer,solve and ‘hack’ the future of the solutionist state.

Susan Einhorn's insight:

What seems to be overlooked in this research is the value of computational thinking when approaching new problems and that this is but one approach, not the only one to use. On the other hand, the author makes some interesting statements about defining policies based on economic needs and corporate interests rather than the benefits to students. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Is coding the new literacy?

Is coding the new literacy? | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

...you might be forgiven for thinking that learning code is a short, breezy ride to a lush startup job with a foosball table and free kombucha, especially given all the hype about billion-dollar companies launched by self-taught wunderkinds (with nary a mention of the private tutors and coding camps that helped some of them get there). The truth is, code—if what we're talking about is the chops you'd need to qualify for a programmer job—is hard, and lots of people would find those jobs tedious and boring.

 

But let's back up a step: What if learning to code weren't actually the most important thing? It turns out that rather than increasing the number of kids who can crank out thousands of lines of JavaScript, we first need to boost the number who understand what code can do. As the cities that have hosted Code for America teams will tell you, the greatest contribution the young programmers bring isn't the software they write. It's the way they think. It's a principle called "computational thinking," and knowing all of the Java syntax in the world won't help if you can't think of good ways to apply it.

Susan Einhorn's insight:

Interesting exploration of issues ranging from differentiating the value of coding from that of computational thinking, computational thinking and computer literacy as a new, essential literacy, the lack of minorities and women in computer science, the lack of computer science classes in US schools, etc. And, of course, the mention of kids in Vietnam tackling what seems to be a tough topic in programming for older kids in the US - loops -  easily as they program in Logo. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Coding in the Classroom: Computational Thinking Will Allow Children to 'Change the World'

Coding in the Classroom: Computational Thinking Will Allow Children to 'Change the World' | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

"Computer programs are among the largest and most sophisticated artefacts that human beings have ever built," Peyton Jones tells IBTimes UK. He describes looking at a program like looking at the Empire State building through a computer screen-sized window. "You don't get the same visceral sense of its scale and sophistication," he says, "but it's still there."

 

With coding now an integral part of the computing programmes of study in the new national curriculum in England, Peyton Jones hopes that more people will gain an understanding and appreciation of the technology that surrounds us.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

A computing revolution in schools - BBC News

A computing revolution in schools - BBC News | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

There are bound to be teething troubles as schools get to grips with this new approach to teaching about computers. But we should not lose sight of the long term aim - which is not necessarily to produce a nation of Mark Zuckerbergs. Only a minority of children will have any great interest in or aptitude for coding, just as only a few will want to become mathematicians.

 

But most of them will need to understand something about how computers work and just about all of them can enjoy the creative possibilities that digital technology offers. If we can show a new generation how to be the masters not the servants of the machines of the future, then that is a prize worth winning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Computational Thinking: How To Get It, and Why It’s Important « Annie Murphy Paul

Ultimately, Computer Science Unplugged aims to evoke intrinsic interest in its subject—to inspire students to regard computer science as an exciting intellectual adventure. Later, of course, they can go on to use an actual computer to learn to program. But students’ offline introduction to computer science may well make them more interested in pursuing the subject, and may increase the odds that what they learn later will be absorbed in a deep and lasting way.

 

Even those students who don’t go on to study computer science will have gained something valuable: the capacity for computational thinking.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Einhorn from COMPUTATIONAL THINKING IN K-12
Scoop.it!

Evolving the definition of Computational thinking

Evolving the definition of Computational thinking | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it

It could be tempting to reduce computational thinking to just another subject to be taught in schools. However, if we take a more aspirational viewpoint (again the examples here are very interesting long version of Jeanette Wing’s presentation)  – then the interplay between humans and computers will change the behaviour of both.

A more sweeping definition of Computational Thinking would call for new skills, new ways of thinking and make a radical change to the economies who adopt these principles.


Via Pierre Levy, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Einhorn
Scoop.it!

Is Computer Programming Hard? Not if You Have These 7 Characteristics!

Is Computer Programming Hard? Not if You Have These 7 Characteristics! | Computational Tinkering | Scoop.it
The truth is that not everyone can hack it as a computer programmer. It takes a unique set of characteristics to succeed in this field. We enlisted some programming pros to identify what it takes to hack it in this career.
more...
No comment yet.