COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING
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Supercomputing goes back to school | iSGTW

Supercomputing goes back to school | iSGTW | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
Eric Fahrenthold, a long-time supercomputing user and mechanical engineering professor at UT Austin, attended a Stampede workshop on the MIC architecture last spring. Attending the session provided an on-ramp for using ...
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COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING
Supercomputing requires math, thinking skills, algebra and computational thinking and an awareness of gateways to computing. New technologies require rethinking the use of technology Cyberlearning does that for transformational learning.
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Virtual Reality Is a Disappointment? Not in the World of Video Gamers

Virtual Reality Is a Disappointment? Not in the World of Video Gamers | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
The video gaming industry continues to pour money and resources into virtual reality, cementing its development and advancement.
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Introduction to Python, Data Science & Computational Thinking: Free Online Courses from MIT

Introduction to Python, Data Science & Computational Thinking: Free Online Courses from MIT | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it

MIT has posted online the video lectures for an essential series of courses. In the playlist of 38 lectures above, you can get an Introduction to Computer Science and Programming in Python. Recorded this past fall, and taught by Prof. Eric Grimson, Prof. John Guttag ...


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Udacity offers photographers the chance to be Virtual Reality pioneers.

Udacity offers photographers the chance to be Virtual Reality pioneers. | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
In 2003, the British photographer Robbie Cooper was employed to photograph the CEO of a large business. As they talked between shots, Cooper learnt that the man had recently separated from his wife, and didn’t get much of a chance to spend time with his kids - until he found something called Everque

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Here's when robots will start beating humans at every task

Here's when robots will start beating humans at every task | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
A survey of AI researchers tallied predictions for when machines will start beating humans at everything from LEGO assembly to essay-writing.

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Varjo promises a VR headset with 'human eye-resolution'

Varjo promises a VR headset with 'human eye-resolution' | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
A Finnish company called Varjo that has been working in secret until now has unveiled a new type of VR and AR headset code-named "20/20." It supposedly has

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SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING - Virtual Reality Experience Trailer

Experience VR through the eyes of Spider-Man. Try it in select @Cinemark Theaters across the country and see #SpiderManHomecoming in theaters July 7th
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Google Is Developing Artificial Intelligent That Can Make More AI

Google Is Developing Artificial Intelligent That Can Make More AI | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
We all know that creating a high-quality artificial intelligence is not an easy work. Google Company has deeply depended on AI it is very critical to create AI software.

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Canada to teach computer coding starting in kindergarten

Canada to teach computer coding starting in kindergarten | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
The government also wants the program to encourage more young women and indigenous children to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math.
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Computational Thinking & DCF

Computational Thinking & DCF | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
A set of informative posters to support the delivery of the Digital Competence Framework!<br />
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With particular relevance to the Digital Competence Framework within Wales, this resource was created as a guide to educators at all levels on how t
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Can virtual reality enable 3D creation for all?

Can virtual reality enable 3D creation for all? | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
If you look at the evolution of virtual reality capturing the world around us, we keep getting closer and closer to what the world actually looks like.
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Technical & Human Problems With Anthropomorphism & Technopomorphism

Technical & Human Problems With Anthropomorphism & Technopomorphism | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, and intentions to non-human entities (OED). It has been used in storytelling from Aesop to Zootopia, and people debate its impact on how…

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A new world in sight: virtual reality to advance human health

A new world in sight: virtual reality to advance human health | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
Virtual reality set to advance human health through innovative midwifery project at UON.

Via Peter Mellow, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Envisageapps's comment, June 14, 8:29 AM
nice
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The Invent To Learn Guide to Block Programming – Invent To Learn @garystager

The Invent To Learn Guide to Block Programming – Invent To Learn @garystager | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
For decades, the dream of programming computers without words or the ability to make syntax errors had eluded computer scientists. Today, is the dawn of a new era in block programming languages designed for children to learn with, control their world, solve problems, and express themselves.

Here are the languages worthy of your consideration. Each is a dialect of the Logo programming language. (Read What is Logo? by Seymour Papert)

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SIS 2017: Computational Thinking at the Heart of the New Digital Divide

SIS 2017: Computational Thinking at the Heart of the New Digital Divide | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
With the global workforce turning to more technology-focused jobs, educators need to introduce computational thinking to prepare workers for the future.

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Paul Herring's curator insight, June 22, 1:18 AM
“Right now, there are 500,000 open computing jobs across the U.S., and only 40,000 students are graduating to fill those positions, ..."
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Is the Future of Gaming an Augmented Reality Holodeck? 

Is the Future of Gaming an Augmented Reality Holodeck?  | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
Off the shelf motion detection and projection mapping technologies transform an empty room into an augmented reality play space.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 21, 8:29 PM

Future of gaming's in the news!

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Virtual reality audiences stare straight ahead 75% of the time

Virtual reality audiences stare straight ahead 75% of the time | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
YouTube's advice to turn heads is 'make better videos'. Literally. That's all they've got

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 19, 6:52 PM

Hmm...I'm always looking around. ;)

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Using Digital Games — And Empathy — As Teaching Tools

Using Digital Games — And Empathy — As Teaching Tools | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it

"Dr. Matt Farber, a social studies teacher at Valleyview Middle School in Denville, New Jersey, uses digital games in the classroom as a way to take his kids on impossible field trips, to back-in-time revolutions or to current, far away conflicts.

 
 

"But his 11- and 12-year-old students aren't expected to simply click their way through multiple choice questions. These games are engaging and narrative-driven, rooted in facts and primary sources, and often based on a series of the player's decisions."


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shazia.wj's curator insight, June 20, 4:35 AM
Using Digital Games — And Empathy — As Teaching Tools
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360-Virtual Reality: The Ultimate Storytelling Platform

360-Virtual Reality: The Ultimate Storytelling Platform | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
A multi-platform approach to storytelling is best.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 19, 6:51 PM

Yes, for digital storytelling! Gotta try this soon.

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The 25 best VR games for PC, consoles and mobile

The 25 best VR games for PC, consoles and mobile | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
The best VR games are already here, and now Sparc by CCP Games enters our radar.

Via David W. Deeds, Aki Puustinen, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Jim Lerman
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 15, 6:42 PM

Check this out! 

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Md. needs coding classes starting in kindergarten - Baltimore Sun

Md. needs coding classes starting in kindergarten - Baltimore Sun | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it


Today in Maryland public schools, we require students to take courses in a foreign language — Spanish, French, German — because learning a language enriches their lives and helps them interact in a more interconnected world. That’s a wonderful thing. But unfortunately, we’re doing a terrible job teaching our children the language that’s now driving the economy: computer code. Our entire lives revolve around computers, and so does our economy. Over 500,000 American computer science jobs went unfilled last year — including more than 20,000 jobs right here in Maryland. But too many of our politicians in Maryland haven’t gotten the message. (Or the tweet or the Facebook post or whatever.)Consider this: In Maryland today, only 40 percent[1] of public schools even offer computer science courses. Or, put another way, the majority of Maryland students don’t even have the opportunity to learn computer code even if they have an interest in it. That’s stunning. And when you look at Gov. Larry Hogan’s $6.3 billion budget for Maryland education, there are exactly zero dollars in dedicated funding to computer science. Last year, 29 governors signed a public letter calling for expanding computer science education. Notably, Maryland’s governor was not among them. The state has no uniform curriculum standards for computer science and no strategic plan in place to better prepare our children for the realities of this economy. That must change. As a former teacher in Baltimore City Public Schools and senior advisor for innovation in the Obama administration, I have a unique understanding for what we must to do better-prepare our kids for the changing economy. That’s why I’m proposing that we require that all Maryland schools offer computer science and coding classes by 2022.In order to achieve that reality, we need to invest in teachers. I believe Maryland has the best teachers in America (although admittedly I’m biased, as my wife is a Maryland public school teacher), but we need to better fund their preparation, training and professional development programs. That’s the only way we’ll build the pipeline we need of teachers who can instruct computer science courses.We can pay for this by creating a private-public consortium of technology companies, universities and government agencies, in which private investment drives teacher training programs. It’s clear that the private sector has a vested interest in creating a workforce that has up-to-date computer skills.
We also must convene a team of leaders in education, technology and government to establish statewide curriculum standards for computer science course work, to ensure that teachers have high-quality materials and a clear framework for instruction. Other states, like Virginia, have established these standards, while Maryland has not. There’s another reality we must acknowledge and address: The Internet economy has created trillions of dollars of wealth and millions of jobs, but women, African Americans and Latinos — together comprising 66 percent of America — account for shockingly few of those jobs and are the beneficiaries of very little of that wealth. Only about 25 percent of professional computing jobs are held by women. African American and Latino professionals make up only 5 percent of the technical workforce at the nation’s top technology companies. Requiring computer science and coding classes in all of our schools will help create more opportunity, but beyond that, we should create a special initiative to develop programs and civic partnerships to address gender, racial and ethnic diversity in computer science education. Most of us (adults) didn’t learn computer science or coding in schools — and many of us probably wish we had. But for today’s students, it needs to be a “must.” We need to make computer science education a top priority in Maryland.Alec Ross (alecross.com) is a technology entrepreneur, former Obama administration official, author and Democrat running for governor in Maryland. References^ 40 percent (code.org)
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BBC Bitesize - KS3 Computer Science - Introduction to computational thinking - Revision 1

Introducing computational thinking
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Developing Computational Thinking and Coding Self-Esteem - Learning.com

Developing Computational Thinking and Coding Self-Esteem - Learning.com | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it


I recently read an article by the Nemours Foundation[1] about how children develop self-esteem. Certain portions of the article jumped out at me as directly related to students learning to code:
“As kids try, fail, try again, fail again, and then finally succeed, they develop ideas about their own capabilities…Self-esteem is the result of experiences that help a child feel capable, effective, and accepted. When kids learn to do things for themselves and feel proud of what they can do, they feel capable. Children feel effective when they see that good things come from efforts like trying hard, getting close to a goal, or making progress.” (Nemours Foundation)
As I read, I recalled a recent conversation with a former employee of Sun Microsystems who after making a good living at Sun, left to teach high school computer science (that alone makes her a saint in my book). She said the biggest challenge she faces helping her students become proficient coders is helping them develop what she called “stick-to-it-iveness”, or a student’s willingness to try, fail, try again, fail again…all the while learning from their mistakes and then finally succeeding. A close second is developing a proficiency with the processes of algorithmic problem solving or computational thinking.
So why are these students – who have been raised with technology since they were born – struggling at solving problems with technology? For decades, coding and programming were something available in only certain schools and achievable only by the brightest of students…arguably those who already possessed a strong academic self-esteem with a can-do attitude toward learning anything.
How is coding self-esteem developed?
To take a note from the teacher I mentioned earlier, students need direct assistance in developing the foundational computational thinking skills needed to know how to solve problems. Direct instruction in concepts such as developing algorithms, modeling algorithms with flow charts, modeling data in a spreadsheet and with graphs, creating a prototype to test an idea, and testing an implemented solution for ways it can be improved is essential to helping students establish foundational computational thinking skills. Organizations like k-12cs.org, ISTE, and CSTA have already developed frameworks and standards that incorporate these principles. Curricular resources such as Code.org, Scratch, and EasyTech can go a long way to helping students develop essential computational thinking skills.
Over the past five years, significant improvements and access to block-based coding have helped accelerate the development of core computational thinking skills of students. Though, only 25% of K-12 schools offer computer science instruction today. Certainly developing computational thinking skills is only one of many steps in helping students develop confidence in coding. Students also need early experiences in which they have success with real-world, text-based programming languages to develop their coding self-esteem before the insecurities of adolescence sets in.
Starting early is critical
Beginning as early as third grade, students are ready to learn text-based coding with simple programming languages. Curricular resources such as CodeMonkey, Codesters, and EasyCode help students make the leap from block-based coding to text-based coding. In EasyCode, for example, students learn to code in a computer language used by businesses today such as CoffeeScript and Python. Then, they apply those skills by building their own games, interactive stories, and other projects.
These solutions often use game-based learning environments which have proven to be highly successful in teaching students to write real code to solve small coding challenges. These game-like environments gradually get more complex, building confidence with students in their newly growing coding skills.
By taking it in small steps, students can very quickly move from creating text-based code that simply sequences functions to creating code with complex conditionals, nested loops and that leverages mouse and keyboard input. Once students have developed these core skills, students can transition from learners to creators by building their own games through simple game-building environments – skyrocketing their coding self-esteem.
Coding skills are life skills
In today’s world, it is imperative that all students have experience in coding to be effective in any career today. I believe (and have seen) students of all ages develop aptitudes in digital literacy, computational thinking and coding regardless of their previous experience. But to do so, we must provide students with regular experiences that help students develop foundational computational thinking skills and coding self-esteem early so that students progress with “can-do” attitudes toward coding.
By learning to code in the early years, students develop a love for coding that can spark an interest in learning more as they move into high school and beyond. Whether students choose a career in computer science or not, exposure to real coding experiences and success empowers students to be able to solve today’s problems in any field.
If you would like to see our Coding and Computational Thinking curriculum in action, click here[2].

References^ Nemours Foundation (www.nemours.org)^ click here (www.learning.com)
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:
In a game or in an exploration it is ok to be wrong and to do over. Not so on paper assignments.
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The world needs knowledge catalysts

The world needs knowledge catalysts | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
When people are presented with a problem the first urge is to resolve it. If the computer does not work, they want it fixed. Then they can move on to what they were trying to do in the first place. But quite often the source of the problem did not go away. People also need to understand how the problem was created. This requires time and effort to learn. But when the problem is gone, there is little incentive to learn about the implications and complexities that created the problem.

Via Edumorfosis, Yashy Tohsaku, Miloš Bajčetić, Jim Lerman
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, June 22, 9:45 AM
The world needs knowledge catalysts
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Want to Go To Space? This is How Much It Will Cost You

Want to Go To Space? This is How Much It Will Cost You | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
We’ve been dreaming about space tourism ever since man first set foot on the Moon. And it’s here. But how many of us can really afford it?
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Robotics and Computer Science for Elementary Level Learners - @JackieGerstein

Robotics and Computer Science for Elementary Level Learners - @JackieGerstein | COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING | Scoop.it
I absolutely love all of the new robotics toys that have been coming out for elementary age learners.  I have been using them for my summer maker camp, with my gifted education classes, and for my upcoming Saturday morning program. One of my gifted girls noted, “Where do all of these robots come from?” I laughed and told her, “It’s actually has become one of my passions. Collecting them has become a major hobby of mine.”

I usually use them for an hour per week with my two groups of gifted learners.  I am an advocate of student-centric learning and giving them choices as to which instructional activities they would like to engage. For their robotics hour each week, I am giving them the following choices with their goal of using five of the robotics to complete five of the tasks provided.

Via John Evans
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, May 29, 4:26 PM
All new to me and I have no experience with any of this but I am certain that kids will love the experience. This project describes working with very capable students in an extracurricular program.
Prescott Kermit's comment, June 15, 5:25 AM
http://www.free-tech-support.com/samsung-technical-support-number