Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology
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Insight into feeding behaviour of first amphibians

Insight into feeding behaviour of first amphibians | Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology | Scoop.it

A researcher at the Terrassa Campus of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. BarcelonaTech (UPC) has for the first time applied numerical calculus and computer simulation techniques to determine the mechanical properties of the skulls of early tetrapods, the first amphibians to appear on the planet. Thanks to this technology, researchers at the Miquel Crusafont Catalan Institute of Palaeontology (ICP) have been able to learn about the feeding behaviour of these prehistoric animals

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Teenage Great White Sharks Have Weak Bite

Teenage Great White Sharks Have Weak Bite | Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology | Scoop.it

- Using 3-D computer models, scientists determined that teenage great whites have relatively weak bites.

- The discovery helps to explain why some great white sharks bite human victims and then quickly retreat.

- It takes years for great whites to develop enough stiff, mineralized cartilage to resist forces involved in big bites

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My PhD: Part 3: the return of the ichthyosaurs

My PhD: Part 3: the return of the ichthyosaurs | Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology | Scoop.it
In this, the final of my original trilogy describing my planned studies, I will talk about the ‘spin-offs’ from looking at the British genera and phylogeny.  The other posts are: Part 1: a new icht...
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Patterns in Palaeontology: Old shapes, new tricks — The study of fossil morphology

Patterns in Palaeontology: Old shapes, new tricks — The study of fossil morphology | Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology | Scoop.it

The size and shape of an organism is the product of genetics and environment. It is the raw material on which the process of natural selection (survival of particular animals over others) acts, and so is of central interest in studies of the evolution of ancient forms of life for which DNA information is not available. Fossil morphology, or shape, is the basis of most palaeontological studies, be they describing new species or making deductions about the animal’s lifestyle. Phylogenetic studies, those that place species in groups depending on how closely they are related to each other, are based on the presence and absence of particular features.

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Who are you calling weak? Human jaws are surprisingly strong and efficient : Not Exactly Rocket Science

Who are you calling weak? Human jaws are surprisingly strong and efficient : Not Exactly Rocket Science | Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology | Scoop.it

Stephen Wroe has built a career out of analysing some of the planet’s most formidable skulls. His group at the University of New South Wales have studied the strength, sturdiness and biting power of the sabre-toothed cat, the great white shark, and the Komodo dragon. Now, he has turned his attention to a predator whose skull is far less impressive but yields surprises all the same – us.

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Marsupial Lion

It was a nine-foot kangaroo with the ferocity of a lion. Ready to rumble? Death of the Megabeasts : http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/episode/dea...
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"Advances in Computational Models for vertebrate structures in Biology and Palaeontology" Minisymposia

"Advances in Computational Models for vertebrate structures in Biology and Palaeontology" Minisymposia | Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology | Scoop.it

On behalf of the WCCM-ECCM-ECFD2014 Organizing Committee (11th. World Congress on Computational Mechanics (WCCM2014), 5th. European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM V), 6th. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics (ECFD VI)), it is a great pleasure to invite you to the Minisymposia for this joint congress called ADVANCES IN COMPUTATIONAL MODELS FOR VERTEBRATE STRUCTURES IN BIOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY to be held in Barcelona, July 20- July 25th, 2014.

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Jordi Marcé Nogué's comment, April 16, 2013 5:46 AM
If you are interested in the Mynisimposia, please don't hesitate to contact me for any question: jordi.marce@upc.edu
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Palaeontology is a Real Science Part 2: Using CT Scans

Palaeontology is a Real Science Part 2: Using CT Scans | Computational Biomechanics in Palaeontology | Scoop.it

This week, we'll continue on with our theme of "palaeontology is a real science" by talking about how palaeontologists use computed tomography (CT) to view and analyse fossils. Many of you have probably heard of CT scans in terms of medicine. The basis of this technique is that it uses x-rays to produce cross-sectional tomographic images ('slices') of the area of the body in question. These slices can then be studied for abnormalities such as tumours, as it can show some soft tissue as well. If several x-rays are taken around an axis of rotation, the slices can be put together to form a 3-dimensional model of the structure in question, showing the internal and external structure

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