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¿Por qué hoy no es posible la revolución?

¿Por qué hoy no es posible la revolución? | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Para descifrar la alta estabilidad del sistema de dominación liberal hay que entender cómo funcionan los actuales mecanismos de poder. El comunismo como mercancía es el fin de la revolución
Luciana de Paula's insight:

¿Por qué el régimen de dominación neoliberal es tan estable? ¿Por qué hay tan poca resistencia? ¿Por qué toda resistencia se desvanece tan rápido? ¿Por qué ya no es posible la revolución a pesar del creciente abismo entre ricos y pobres? Para explicar esto es necesario una comprensión adecuada de cómo funcionan hoy el poder y la dominación.

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Cultura Inquieta - Impresionantes techos de mezquitas que destacan las maravillas de la arquitectura islámica

Cultura Inquieta - Impresionantes techos de mezquitas que destacan las maravillas de la arquitectura islámica | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Impresionanes techos de mezquitas que destacan las maravillas de la arquitectura islámica
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Astronomy: Planets in chaos

Astronomy: Planets in chaos | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
The discovery of thousands of star systems wildly different from our own has demolished ideas about how planets form.
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Complex systems made simple

Complex systems made simple | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Network scientists at Northeastern have designed an algorithm capable of identifying the subset of components that reveal a complex system's overall nature.

Via Spaceweaver, Tim Williamson, NESS
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Eli Levine's curator insight, July 10, 2:02 PM

Way cool. And useful. 

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The future of robotics is squishy

The future of robotics is squishy | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Andy Marchese has a lot of fish tanks but no fish food — his fish prefer batteries and compressed air. On a recent Monday, Marchese conducted an out-of-water demonstration of Bubbles, a...

Via Alessio Erioli
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Your reality is actually 15 seconds long

Your reality is actually 15 seconds long | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
The present moment, as you are experiencing it this very instant, is directly influenced by the previous 15 seconds of your life, reports Quartz. Researchers from MIT and the University of...

Via Alessio Erioli
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Inter-activ' : Michel Serres - "Faire le pont entre l'information et le savoir, c’est une nouvelle façon d’enseigner"


Via Laurent Blanquer
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Masson Isabelle's comment, August 26, 2013 3:25 PM
Entretien avec Michel Serres : une analyse éclairante de notre société en mutation (enseignement, politique, mariage, réseaux sociaux...). A écouter !
Grd Lyon-millenaire3's comment, August 27, 2013 3:31 AM
Petite poucette continue à jeter ses cailloux...
SYCFI's curator insight, August 30, 2013 2:27 AM
Une nouvelle mise en perspective stimulante de M. Serres pour notre communauté prof. !

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Top 10 Things a City Can Do To Become a Shareable City - Collaborative Consumption

Top 10 Things a City Can Do To Become a Shareable City - Collaborative Consumption | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
A Shareable City looks at multiple aspects of urban planning and community well-being through a collaborative economy lens, and proactively supports activities and platforms. Here are some of the best ways to get started.
Via Manu Fernandez
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The Holographic Universe, Perceiving Reality!

The Holographic Universe, Perceiving Reality! | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
The holographic universe is a book by Michael Talbot, (1953-1992), he was also the author of a number of books highlighting parallels between ancient mysticism and quantum mechanics, and espousing a theoretical model of reality that suggests the physical...
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Are we living in a HOLOGRAM? Physicists believe our universe could just be a projection of another cosmos

Are we living in a HOLOGRAM? Physicists believe our universe could just be a projection of another cosmos | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Researchers in Japan have provided compelling evidence to support the holographic model of our universe put forward by physicist Juan Maldacena.
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The Possible Parallel Universe of Dark Matter

The Possible Parallel Universe of Dark Matter | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
As researchers learn more about dark matter's complexities, it seems possible that our galaxy lives on top of a shadow galaxy without us even knowing it.

 

All known particles make up only a small fraction of the energy density in our universe, yet the Standard Model is extremely complicated: three forces, one Higgsed, one confining, plus quarks and leptons organized into three generations. This model—the components of the visible universe—
deviates markedly from any apparent principle of minimality. Yet, when considering the 85% of the matter in the universe that is dark, our usual response is to turn to minimal models of a cold, collisionless particle: a WIMP, perhaps, or an axion.

 

Two recent advances hint at just how much we have been missing about the dark side. In January 2012, Christoph Weniger, a physicist at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, started noticing hints of a strange type of radiation around the center of our galaxy. To his excitement, he realized that the glow could be a signal of dark-matter particles smashing into each other and, in the process, transforming from something invisible to something visible. If so, it might finally be possible to go beyond simply deducing where dark matter gathers, and start learning how it actually behaves.

 

The other shoe dropped earlier this year, when a group of Harvard University theorists, including Lisa Randall and JiJi Fan, formulated a new theory of dark matter. One of the oddest things about Weniger’s detection, Randall notes, is that it was possible at all. “The signal would be too small for you to see under most reasonable models of dark matter,” she says. But Randall and her collaborators realized they could tidily explain the observation if there were a second type of dark matter out there: one that is not as diffuse as the dominant component of dark matter, but can interact with itself, just like visible matter. Clumps of this interacting kind of dark matter could form a disk, collapsing into a plane that could produce a correspondingly concentrated signal like the one Weniger saw.

 

Acknowledging that dark matter might have some of the same kind of diversity as visible matter may seem a minor adjustment. But it’s one that has, as Randall narrates in an excited staccato, “super-dramatic consequences.” If one variety of dark matter can clump together, it could form a panoply of previously unimagined dark structures. It could ball up into dark stars surrounded by dark planets made of dark atoms. In the most extravagant leap of possibility, this new kind of dark matter might even allow the existence of dark life.

 

Getting mainstream scientists to move past their light-matter chauvinism and take that shadow world seriously will require some highly convincing evidence. Weniger frets that the Fermi observations are too ambiguous to do the trick. “What one needs is more data with the same experiment to establish that the signal is there,” he says. 

 

Harvard astronomer Douglas Finkbeiner is making an independent analysis of the Fermi data and likewise is finding that his results hang halfway between verification and falsification. “It’s the most frustrating possible outcome,” he sighs. “One option is that the signal is just not as bright as we thought it was.” 

 

Randall is ready to forge ahead regardless of the fate of this particular observation. “The gamma ray line may not stay, but this just turns out to be independently such an interesting scenario, with so many interesting implications,” she says. And if our galaxy really does live right on top of a shadow galaxy, there are other ways to prove it.

 

Researchers are working on a new European space observatory called Gaia, scheduled to launch this autumn, which should perform a particularly telling test. Gaia will map the locations and velocities of about 1 billion stars within the Milky Way. Searching for anomalous motions could shade in the outlines of an invisible, dense disk of dark matter pulling on those stars. 

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Renato P. dos Santos
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Miro Svetlik's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:50 AM

This is a nice one and I like the idea, however I am asking myself what features are causing dark world weigth to be so much more than barryonic matter? Symmetrical anti particles idea is condemned to the fairyland.

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It's a Matter of Darkness: Digging Into the Large Hadron Collider Project [Infographic]

It's a Matter of Darkness: Digging Into the Large Hadron Collider Project [Infographic] | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it

You’ve heard about it before: the Large Hadron Collider, often referred to as “one of the great engineering milestones of mankind,” it is also one of the largest, encompassing a 17 mile circumference tube buried 330 feet under the border of France and Switzerland. But just what is it intended to discover? The behemoth project is tasked with unlocking the secrets of particle physics, giving us a look into what happened at the dawn of time by recreating the conditions when it all began.

 

This graphic – a collaboration between Microsoft Project and Column Five – looks at the massive scope of the experiments being undertaken and the equally massive implications to everyday life when we find out what’s really going on.


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Luciana de Paula from actions de concertation citoyenne
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CyberACTIVISM Within the Global Digital Divide: a Case Study of Peru

The following thesis wants to explore if and to what extent cyber-activism is possible in a developing country such as Peru, in the context of the global digital divide. In order to do that, it
will investigate Peruvians‟ perception of online activism; it will take into account recent cases of online activism from Peru; and it will put into discussion several concepts such as alternative media,
the democratic divide and the global digital divide.
The interest for this subject has emerged from my contact with news regarding the social movements taking place in Peru, in order to protect indigenous communities against resource depletion and exploitation.
In order to conduct the research, I have used qualitative unobtrusive research methods such as media content analysis and netnography.


Via association concert urbain
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Tracking the Future just got better

Tracking the Future just got better | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it

Dear Friend!

 

Tracking the Future is a curated news collection. We explore the rapid advancement of science and technology and their long term impact on society

I'd like to invite you to follow the magazine and check out the upgraded category filters!

Thank you for stopping by and spreading the message!

 

You can follow Tracking the future on other platforms too:

 

check out the magazine on Flipboard: http://flip.it/7U6S1

 

the video board on Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/trackingthe/future/


the tumblr page: http://trackingthefuture.tumblr.com/


the wordpress page: http://trackingthefuture.wordpress.com/

 

on google plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/104526639588787227921/posts

 

on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/trackingthefuture

 

via RSS > http://www.scoop.it/t/tracking-the-future/rss.xml

 

or you can follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/szabolcs_kosa

 


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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hedgeshandy's comment, October 17, 2013 6:30 AM
Thats superb...
Karen Bale's curator insight, May 11, 10:53 PM

Follow the links to further information on the future impact of rapidly developing technology on society.

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Scientists have NO idea how planets form

Scientists have NO idea how planets form | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Astronomers are being forced to rewrite their theories of planet formation (shown). Washington DC-based Nasa and others are struggling to explain them.
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The city as network - Social Physics

The city as network - Social Physics | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Traditionally, cities have been viewed as the sum of their locations – the buildings, monuments, squares and parks that spring to mind when we think of ‘New York’, ‘London’ or ‘Paris’. In The new science of cities (Amazon US| Amazon UK), Michael Batty argues that a more productive approach is to think of cities in terms of …
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Lix, un bolígrafo 3D que permite dibujar objetos reales en el aire

Lix, un bolígrafo 3D que permite dibujar objetos reales en el aire | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it
Las impresoras 3D están avanzando mucho, pero aún están sujetas a una estructura que limita el tamaño de los objetos que pueden crear. Lix es la apuesta creativa del diseñador afincado en Londres Anton Suvorov. Se trata de un bolígrafo que genera filamentos de plástico como los de una impresora 3D y permite, literalmente, dibujar objetos tridimensionales en el aire.
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Stephen Hawking Goes Grey

Stephen Hawking Goes Grey | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it

The popular titles stating that Hawking says, “there are no black holes” is incorrect

Recently there has been a fair amount of publicity about the publication of a transcription of a talk given by Stephen Hawking at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California, in August 2013, where Hawking discusses his possible resolution to the so called Information Paradox and the firewall theorem. In the extremely oversimplified explanation given by several media commentators it has been said that Stephen Hawking has refuted the existence of Black Holes with misleading titles such as – Stephen Hawking: ‘There are no black holes’  (from Nature magazine one of the most prestigious scientific journals).  In fact this was absolutely not the case.  Hawking did not say there are no black holes – he merely suggested that the classical notion of a gravitational body in which light cannot escape may need to be revised. In his revision, there is still a black hole horizon, yet due to the extremely turbulent dynamics at the quantum level of the boundary, the persistence and structure of the horizon is uncertain. Just like the weather on Earth, which can be predicted yet always with some level of uncertainty, the apparent horizon is deterministic but chaotic. Thus the title of his talk “Information Preservation and Weather Forecasting for Black Holes” (the transcription of which was posted on the arXiv server). Here Hawking, redefines the event horizon as an apparent horizon saying, “This suggests that black holes should be redefined as metastable bound states of the gravitational field.” Hawking concludes that this effectively means that information can be emitted from the trans-horizon area of a black hole – making them more akin to “grey holes”, where information (matter and energy) can go in, and come out as well. This is an attempt to resolve the so called “information loss paradox” where all the information that falls into a black hole would be lost as the black hole evaporates to nothing, due to an earlier postulate by Hawking – known as Hawking radiation – which describes the emission of vacuum fluctuations “virtual particles” producing a slight loss of energy overtime for the black hole, eventually leading to its complete evaporation.

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▶ Chaos, Complexity, and Public Policy

Irene Sanders Executive Director and Founder of the Washington Center for Complexity and Public Policy and author of "Strategic Thinking and the New Science: Planning in the Midst of Chaos, Complexity, and Change."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXxs-JtvkkQ


Via Complexity Digest
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 2:09 PM

A way cool panel discussion.  I wish I could be a full practitioner of this new, empirically based governing and political strategic thinking.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 12, 10:34 AM

Loving these new video resources for understanding complexity and it applications.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 23, 9:16 PM

are our politicians aware of these concepts?

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Introduction to Complex Systems: Patterns in Nature

This video provides a basic introduction to the science of complex systems, focusing on patterns in nature. (For more information on agent-based modeling, vi...

Via Lorien Pratt, António F Fonseca, NESS
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 1, 4:50 AM

Agent based modeling still is the best tool to understand complex systems when mathematical modeling gets very complicated.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 7:25 PM

Always looking for good resources to introduce complexity science to others. This looks great. 

Ian Biggs, MAIPM, CPPE's curator insight, April 16, 8:08 PM

I recently conducted a series of workshops on the subject of 'Complex Project Management - Navigating through the unknown'. This clip provides a great introduction to complex systems and for those interested in Complexity Science, this clip is worth 7:52 of your time.

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is it ethical to live ALONE? | THE STATE

is it ethical to live ALONE? | THE STATE | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it

Cities are complex organisms where every thing and every decision is connected. That’s a given. Every choice from a power and an act of resistance changes how the city lives, whether intended that way or not. So when someone faults government for social engineering, what they really mean is “social engineering I don’t like.” All other social engineering is just called governance.

 

Some forms of government interference are by all counts unfortunate. Laws preventing unmarried men and women from living together, as surfaced a few months ago here in Turkey, are silly on the grounds that ‘man and woman’ is a false gender dichotomy more than anything else. Most regulations, projected or otherwise, cannot be dismissed as easily. In September, a restriction on studio apartments was considered by the Turkish government. While this considered law probably had much more to do with rampant corruption in the construction industry and other weird and risible facts that everyone knew about then and clutches their pearls about now that an investigation may or may not be underway—and anyways, many people fell into their political stance before considering the merits of the law—an interesting debate was missed. Is it ethical to live alone in an overcrowded city?


Via Grd Lyon-millenaire3, association concert urbain
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Grd Lyon-millenaire3's curator insight, January 13, 11:38 AM

.[..]When we choose to live in a city, we choose to become part of its urban plan and join its community, not just as its speculative and passive observer. .[..]

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Philosophy of Complex Systems (Book in PDF)


Via John Symons, António F Fonseca, NESS
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Open Humanities Press: Architecture in the Anthropocene: Encounters Among Design, Deep Time, Science and Philosophy

Open Humanities Press: Architecture in the Anthropocene: Encounters Among Design, Deep Time, Science and Philosophy | Complexity.studies | Scoop.it

Research regarding the significance and consequence of anthropogenic transformations of the earth’s land, oceans, biosphere and climate have demonstrated that, from a wide variety of perspectives, it is very likely that humans have initiated a new geological epoch, their own. First labeled the Anthropocene by the chemist Paul Crutzen, the consideration of the merits of the Anthropocene thesis by the International Commission on Stratigraphy and the International Union of Geological Sciences has also garnered the attention of philosophers, historians, and legal scholars, as well as an increasing number of researchers from a range of scientific backgrounds. Architecture in the Anthropocene: Encounters Among Design, Deep Time, Science and Philosophy intensifies the potential of this multidisciplinary discourse by bringing together essays, conversations, and design proposals that respond to the “geological imperative” for contemporary architecture scholarship and practice. Contributors include Nabil Ahmed, Meghan Archer, Adam Bobbette, Emily Cheng, Heather Davis, Sara Dean, Seth Denizen, Mark Dorrian, Elizabeth Grosz, Lisa Hirmer, Jane Hutton, Eleanor Kaufman, Amy Catania Kulper, Clinton Langevin, Michael C.C. Lin, Amy Norris, John Palmesino, Chester Rennie, François Roche, Ann-Sofi Rönnskog, Isabelle Stengers, Paulo Tavares, Etienne Turpin, Eyal Weizman, Jane Wolff, Guy Zimmerman.

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