complexity
Follow
Find
2 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by JeffMiller79 from Wise Leadership
onto complexity
Scoop.it!

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World | complexity | Scoop.it

The basic strength of hierarchies is that if they are designed well -- the departments/silos make sense in light of your business strategy and your competition, there aren't too many levels, the rules that accompany the hierarchy are smart and sensible -- hierarchies can be an incredibly efficient and reliable way to get work done. In fact nobody has found a more efficient and reliable way.

 

The problem is that hierarchies change slowly to changing conditions, to new rapid-fire strategic challenges, to technological discontinuities. They're not agile, they can't jump to the left or to the right quickly. In today's world you have to be fast and agile, but you also have to be efficient and reliable.

 

So the problem is that a well-designed hierarchy is still needed but it's insufficient. You need two systems, one that can handle speed with agility, and one that gets the work done today with quality and efficiency. And the two have to work together hand in glove.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Wise Leader™
JeffMiller79's insight:

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World  #fb

more...
Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, June 5, 4:58 AM

Good interview Huff Post with John Kotter on management, structure and innovation. About the difference between networks and a hierarchical structure Kotter says: "With information liberated from silos and levels, there's a whole different sort of conversation that can take place both in creating ideas and then implementing ideas."

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by JeffMiller79 from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Be More Adaptive in the 21st Century

5 Ways to Be More Adaptive in the 21st Century | complexity | Scoop.it

Retired Gen. Stanley McChrystal explains how to be fast--and smart--about the way that you act.

 

For decades, the principles of efficiency were taught in business schools, and businesses thrived because of it, McChrystal says. But with more information being shared at greater speeds, even the most efficient organization these days can’t keep up.

 

The secret to success is adaptability, he says. You've got to be smarter--and faster--about the way you react, especially in today's world. With that in mind, here are five ways to get your team focused. 



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Efficienarta's curator insight, April 24, 4:57 AM

Valuing a shared consciousness and investing time in the communications and other actions to achieve this could be a great step on the journey rom efficiency towards effectiveness.

Rescooped by JeffMiller79 from Wise Leadership
Scoop.it!

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World | complexity | Scoop.it

The basic strength of hierarchies is that if they are designed well -- the departments/silos make sense in light of your business strategy and your competition, there aren't too many levels, the rules that accompany the hierarchy are smart and sensible -- hierarchies can be an incredibly efficient and reliable way to get work done. In fact nobody has found a more efficient and reliable way.

 

The problem is that hierarchies change slowly to changing conditions, to new rapid-fire strategic challenges, to technological discontinuities. They're not agile, they can't jump to the left or to the right quickly. In today's world you have to be fast and agile, but you also have to be efficient and reliable.

 

So the problem is that a well-designed hierarchy is still needed but it's insufficient. You need two systems, one that can handle speed with agility, and one that gets the work done today with quality and efficiency. And the two have to work together hand in glove.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Wise Leader™
JeffMiller79's insight:

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World  #fb

more...
Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, June 5, 4:58 AM

Good interview Huff Post with John Kotter on management, structure and innovation. About the difference between networks and a hierarchical structure Kotter says: "With information liberated from silos and levels, there's a whole different sort of conversation that can take place both in creating ideas and then implementing ideas."