Complexity & Systems
9.7K views | +1 today
Follow
Complexity & Systems
Complex systems present problems both in mathematical modelling and philosophical foundations. The study of complex systems represents a new approach to science that investigates how relationships between parts give rise to the collective behaviors of a system and how the system interacts and forms relationships with its environment. The equations from which models of complex systems are developed generally derive from statistical physics, information theory and non-linear dynamics, and represent organized but unpredictable behaviors of natural systems that are considered fundamentally complex.  wikipedia (en)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bernard Ryefield
Scoop.it!

Organized Complexity

Organized Complexity | Complexity & Systems | Scoop.it
While I've focused this week thus far on Cities and the Wealth of Nations, Jane Jacobs' most popular book among planners is, of course, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. This is because the latter book contains all the of the happy things
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bernard Ryefield
Scoop.it!

Urban Emergencies : Emergent Urbanism

Urban Emergencies : Emergent Urbanism | Complexity & Systems | Scoop.it

Urban Emergencies : Emergent Urbanism (UE:EU) is an independent research group exploring international and interdisciplinary perspectives on the implications of emergent risks on the built environment and its inhabitants.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bernard Ryefield
Scoop.it!

Flow, Conflux | Smart Cities

Flow, Conflux | Smart Cities | Complexity & Systems | Scoop.it

“The city is not only a community, it is a conflux. ….The real city, as a center of industry, is a conflux of streams of traffic; as a center of culture, it is conflux of streams of thought.” So wrote Benton MacKaye in 1928 in his book The New Exploration: A Philosophy of Regional Planning. When I sent a copy of my own recent book The New Science of Cities to my erstwhile colleague and old friend Lionel March, he quickly scowered it and said: “I see in your Preamble that you cite Castells’ ‘space of flows’ and that your approach makes much of flows and networks. I immediately turned to your bibliography to search for the name Benton MacKaye. It is not there! The author of The New Exploration (1928) is my hero of metropolitan/regional development. I’m sure you know of him”.

more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, April 17, 2014 12:00 PM

Location, location, location.

 

The natural geography has to fit with the demands of the population and the society.  It's not something that someone on high chooses, but rather one where things grow up naturally according to the relative advantages and disadvantages of the area.  Then you build and with building in these geographically advantageous (or, sometimes, just convenient) areas you reinforce their advantages as centers of commerce, trade and "flows" as Batty would put it.

 

It makes sense to have it be on the regional, national and/or international scale, such that we, as humans, take advantage of the most strategic places and the most strategic resources that are available.  With this comes the flourishing of new life, happiness and possible/hopefully sustainable prosperity for the present and for the future well being of our civilizations.

 

The climate is changing and that's going to force a lot of changes on our part.  If we can survive the environmental tumult, and the economic and social tumult that it is going to cause, we could potentially, get off on a better footing than before, in spite of the losses which we incur as a result of the present silliness of our political, social and economic "leadership".

 

Good stuff!

 

Think about it.

Scooped by Bernard Ryefield
Scoop.it!

Zipf's Law for All the Natural Cities around the World

Two fundamental issues surrounding research on Zipf's law regarding city sizes are whether and why Zipf's law holds. This paper does not deal with the latter issue with respect to why, and instead investigates whether Zipf's law holds in a global setting, thus involving all cities around the world. Unlike previous studies, which have mainly relied on conventional census data, and census- bureau-imposed definitions of cities, we adopt naturally and objectively delineated cities, or natural cities, to be more precise, in order to examine Zipf's law. We find that Zipf's law holds remarkably well for all natural cities at the global level, and remains almost valid at the continental level except for Africa at certain time instants. We further examine the law at the country level, and note that Zipf's law is violated from country to country or from time to time. This violation is mainly due to our limitations; we are limited to individual countries, and to a static view on city-size distributions. The central argument of this paper is that Zipf's law is universal, and we therefore must use the correct scope in order to observe it. We further find that this law is reflected in the distribution of cities: the number of cities in individual countries follows an inverse power relationship; the number of cities in the first largest country is twice as many as that in the second largest country, three times as many as that in the third largest country, and so on.
Keywords: Cities, night-time imagery, city-size distributions, head/tail breaks, big data

more...
No comment yet.