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10 Reasons Why We Need Research Literacy, Not Scare Columns

10 Reasons Why We Need Research Literacy, Not Scare Columns | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

The children and media research community has been buzzing with frustration at the viral circulation of Cris Rowan's Huffington Post column, "10 Reasons Why Handheld Devices Should Be Banned for Children Under the Age of 12." The piece pretty well defines "hack-ademic" writing, in which an author throws lots of learned-sounding terms and citations at a lay reader, while obscuring misinterpretations and fuzzy logic. Here are 10 reasons why Rowan's column is flawed.


Via Nik Peachey
Andrew Glynn's insight:

The amount of hackademia around the net, from TED talks to New Scientist Online, is at the point of frightening.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 17, 2014 2:14 AM

10 Reasons Why We Need Research Literacy

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, March 18, 2014 11:49 AM

Interesante debate :)

Monty Bell's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:21 AM

I am constantly trying to defend mobile devices - this helps. 

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Rescooped by Andrew Glynn from Learning Technology News
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The Pointlessness of Unplugging

The Pointlessness of Unplugging | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

If it takes unplugging to learn how better to live plugged in, so be it. But let’s not mistake such experiments in asceticism for a sustainable way of life. For most of us, the modern world is full of gadgets and electronics, and we’d do better to reflect on how we can live there than to pretend we can live elsewhere.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 24, 2014 5:34 AM

Nice article which underlines how technology is now integrated with our lives.

RossanaPiccini's curator insight, March 24, 2014 2:04 PM

It's more often than not that I come across someone who shuns modern technology for a day or two in pursuit of some sort of "purification". What are they really talking about and why? This article begins to explore some of the issues underlying our reborn fear of technology.

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Creating social phrasebooks with Phraseum

Creating social phrasebooks with Phraseum | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

I spend a lot of time looking at different web-based tools and apps and thinking about if and how they can be used for learning. Sometimes it takes some thought and at other times it’s really obvious. With Phraseum it was instantly obvious that this was a really great tool for learning.


Via Nik Peachey
Andrew Glynn's insight:

Interesting way of learning phraseology.

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Anthony MARTINS de NOBREGA's curator insight, March 20, 2014 5:26 AM

un exemple des apports de la technologie à la simplification de l'apprentissage

David Baker's curator insight, March 20, 2014 12:27 PM

I am sharing this with several ELL teachers I work with.  I see this as a tool of potential for our secondary learners as they will have an iPad over the next few years as a part of our 1:1.

Marianne Hart's curator insight, April 3, 2014 9:20 PM

Organize vocabulary...

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Bing Begins Rollout of Secure Search, Say Goodbye to More Keyword Data

Bing Begins Rollout of Secure Search, Say Goodbye to More Keyword Data | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it
Is Bing about to take away more organic keyword data? It sure looks that way, as https://www.bing.com is now active.

Via Bonnie Burns
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Bonnie Burns's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:12 PM

As for the "evolving rollout", it definitely seems to be on the slow side. Only users that are aware that https://www.bing.com is now active would be using it, especially since it was not working previously. I suspect we'll likely see encrypted search first rolled out first to users who are logged into their Microsoft account, similarly to how we saw it rolled out by Google.

Rescooped by Andrew Glynn from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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Complicity: An International Journal of Complexity and Education

Complicity: An International Journal of Complexity and Education | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

Complicity: An International Journal of Complexity and Education in Open Access


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Networked for complexity

Networked for complexity | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it
Ever since humans first daubed works of art on rock faces and in caves, there has been evidence of mankind’s attempts to understand the world in which it finds itself. For millennia this was achieved...
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Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | Yaneer Bar-Yam

Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | Yaneer Bar-Yam | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

It is generally recognized that life is becoming more complex. This article analyzes the 
human social environment using the "complexity profile," a mathematical tool for 
characterizing the collective behavior of a system. The analysis is used to justify the 
qualitative observation that complexity of existence has increased and is increasing. The 
increase in complexity is directly related to sweeping changes in the structure and 
dynamics of human civilization—the increasing interdependence of the global economic 
and social system, and the instabilities of dictatorships, communism and corporate 
hierarchies. Our complex social environment is consistent with identifying global human 
civilization as an organism capable of complex behavior that protects its components 
(us) and which should be capable of responding effectively to complex environmental 
demands


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Lorien Pratt's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:47 PM

This is so important!  We all feel that things are becoming more complex, now here's some evidence to show we're right. And as we suspected, it comes from increasing interdependence and "sweeping changes in the structure and dynamics of civilization".   Thought so!

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 5, 2014 4:34 PM

You see this in the devolution of religion from hierarchically based forms of morality.

 

Or on the decentralization of wealth from a handful of individuals to the general masses.

 

Or the collaborative work of government, rather than the command and control central systems that dominated the 20th century.

 

We're evolving.

 

And we've only begun this journey.

 

Think about it.

Anastasia Baranowski's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:40 PM

Dear Sirs,

 

I think that people from different nationalities have to have marriages between different nationalities. The idea is multinational planet, where people live everywhere they want and they don't have any ideas of nationalizm or rasism. In this case all people can live in peace and harmony. No wars, only worldwide police. Economical development is possible only if people from different countries can come to each other and co-operate. The most important problem behind the human race is ecological! All people on the planet have to co-operate and communicate and help each other to save the planet and themselves and future generations!

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Academics Against Mass Surveillance

The signatories of this declaration call upon nation states to take action. Intelligence agencies must be subjected to transparency and accountability. People must be free from blanket mass surveillance conducted by intelligence agencies from their own or foreign countries. States must effectively protect everyone's fundamental rights and freedoms, and particularly everyone's privacy.

 

If you are an academic and you would like to sign the declaration, please email info (at) academicsagainstsurveillance.net
with your name, academic function and university in the subject line.

http://www.academicsagainstsurveillance.net


Via Complexity Digest, Bernard Ryefield
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10 Reasons Why We Need Research Literacy, Not Scare Columns

10 Reasons Why We Need Research Literacy, Not Scare Columns | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

The children and media research community has been buzzing with frustration at the viral circulation of Cris Rowan's Huffington Post column, "10 Reasons Why Handheld Devices Should Be Banned for Children Under the Age of 12." The piece pretty well defines "hack-ademic" writing, in which an author throws lots of learned-sounding terms and citations at a lay reader, while obscuring misinterpretations and fuzzy logic. Here are 10 reasons why Rowan's column is flawed.


Via Nik Peachey
Andrew Glynn's insight:

The amount of hackademia around the net, from TED talks to New Scientist Online, is at the point of frightening.

more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 17, 2014 2:14 AM

10 Reasons Why We Need Research Literacy

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, March 18, 2014 11:49 AM

Interesante debate :)

Monty Bell's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:21 AM

I am constantly trying to defend mobile devices - this helps. 

Rescooped by Andrew Glynn from Exploring complexity
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Nasa-funded study: industrial civilisation headed for 'irreversible collapse'?

Nasa-funded study: industrial civilisation headed for 'irreversible collapse'? | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it
Nafeez Ahmed: Natural and social scientists develop new model of how 'perfect storm' of crises could unravel global system

Via Marinella De Simone
Andrew Glynn's insight:

Not really sure why a study was needed.  It's pretty obvious stuff.

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Marinella De Simone's curator insight, March 16, 2014 5:18 PM

A new study sponsored by Nasa's Goddard Space Flight Center has highlighted the prospect that global industrial civilisation could collapse in coming decades due to unsustainable resource exploitation and increasingly unequal wealth distribution.

Rescooped by Andrew Glynn from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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The Heart as a Complex Adaptive System

The Heart as a Complex Adaptive System | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

There is mounting evidence that the heart is a system onto itself and that it is intimately intertwined with the nervous and endocrine system residing within its borders. The capacity of self-organized systems to adapt is embodied in the functional organization of the intrinsic control mechanisms. How these regulatory subsystems communicate and how uncoupling of the hierarchical organization results in loss of adaptive "fitness"remains a challenge in human biology. The principles by which "emergent properties" and functional order of a self-organizingsystem, such as the heart, achieve (homeo)dynamic stability provide a non-reductionist framework for understanding how biological system adapts to imposed internal and external stresses, e.g., ischemia, organ/tissue transplantation. In particular, the newly emergent dynamics of cardiac rhythm observed after the heart is transplanted may reflect a more stable,versatile and adaptive (as per "law of requisite variety") bipartite whole. The integrative action of the living organism can not be gotten from their concatenated fractions but is evolved "relationally", i.e., it emanates from emergent internal requirements of the constitutive parts.

J. Yasha Kresh, Igor Izrailtyan, Andrew S. Wechsler 
Depts. of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Medicine 
MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine / Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA


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John Symons's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:23 PM

deeply interesting study of the dynamics of the heart.  

june holley's curator insight, January 7, 2014 8:09 AM

The heart can help us understand self-organization.

Rescooped by Andrew Glynn from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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The Termite and the Architect - Issue 8: Home - Nautilus

The Termite and the Architect - Issue 8: Home - Nautilus | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

In 1991, the multinational Old Mutual investment group approached the Zimbabwean architect Mick Pearce with an audacious assignment. The group wished to construct a retail and office complex called the Eastgate Centre in Zimbabwe’s capital city of Harare that, at 55,000 square meters, would be the country’s largest commercial building. What Old Mutual didn’t wish to do was pay the high cost of air-conditioning such a massive space. Could Pearce, working with the Arup construction firm, devise a design that relied solely on passive, natural climate control?


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Systems Theoretic Techniques for Modeling, Control, and Decision Support in Complex Dynamic Systems

We discuss the problems of modeling, control, and decision support in complex dynamic systems from a general system theoretic point of view. The main characteristics of complex systems and of system approach to complex system study are considered. We provide an overview and analysis of known existing paradigms and methods of mathematical modeling and simulation of complex systems, which support the processes of control and decision making. Then we continue with the general dynamic modeling and simulation technique for complex hierarchical systems functioning in control loop. Architectural and structural models of computer information system intended for simulation and decision support in complex systems are presented.


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▶ On the Nature of Causality in Complex Systems, George F.R. Ellis - YouTube

Big Bang cosmology, chemical and biological evolutionary theory, and associated sciences have been extraordinarily successful in revealing and enabling us to understand the development of the universe from the Planck era to the present, as well as the emergence of complexity, life, and consciousness here on Earth. After briefly sketching this amazing story, and the key characteristics of nature, this paper will reflect on the different types and levels of causality involved -- stressing the important and pervasive role of highly differentiated and dynamic relationships and networks of relationships. Philosophical considerations build on and enrich scientific ones to probe these relationships. They also take us beyond the limits of strictly scientific methodology to consider and model -- however inadequately -- the ultimate sources of existence and order. This is the issue of creation, which introduces another very different -- and transcendent -- level of causality. We show that this is compatible with the -- and even essential to -- the causalities operative in nature, including those of quantum cosmology, if we acknowledge the limits of physics.

This lecture was delivered by George Ellis during the 16th Kraków Methodological Conference "The Causal Universe", May 17-18, 2012.


Via Bernard Ryefield
Andrew Glynn's insight:

As I keep repeating ad nauseum, bottom up causality doesn't work when you go from things of a lower genera (subsystems) to things of a higher genera (system, which may themselves be subsystems of even higher genera).

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António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:57 AM

Very interesting from the philosophical point of view.

Zaphod Beeblebrox's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:39 PM

This really brings up the question - what is the nature of choice inherent in the universe?  If causality defines itself as the operation of a cause onto a single, definable effect, then how does it relate to the POSSIBILITES that exist as a consequence of probability and human limitation?  In other words, can physics be the perpatrator of - and therefore the potential predictor of - what can be viewed as choice as an inexorable consequence of the surrounding conditions?

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 25, 2014 10:59 PM

I've said it several times before.

 

It's going to take a change in the logic of politics, a different program, as it were, to operate and produce a new base level of hardware.  We are bound by some of the lower levels of physics, biology and psychology and the realities of the economic market.  These are the lower level, mechanistic laws that have to be obeyed first, in order to realize what ought to be a common goal of leading relatively happy, prosperous, sustainable and resilient lives.

 

But the politics, by engaging in a different logic that's not meant to benefit only the well to do, will ultimately save itself from collapse and destruction (ironically, the big goal for conservatives, who are so keen on implementing these boot-licking, elite worshipping and poor-punishing programs and policies) and produce a new effect from the established lower level laws that could, potentially, mitigate against major economic and social collapses that, ultimately, ruins the politics as well.

 

Way cool stuff here.  Very relevant for government and governing policy.

 

Think about it.

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Beyond Big Data: Identifying Important Information for Real World Challenges | NECSI

Beyond Big Data: Identifying Important Information for Real World Challenges | NECSI | Complexity and IT | Scoop.it

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