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Ants Swarm Like Brains Think

Ants Swarm Like Brains Think | Complex systems | Scoop.it

Both ants and brains actually rely on two types of feedback, held in a delicate balance: negative (or inhibitory) feedback, and positive (or excitatory) feedback. “Negative feedback tends to cause stability. Positive feedback tends to cause runaway behavior,” said Tomer Czaczkes, an ant biologist at the University of Regensburg in Germany. “These two simple rules make something very powerful.”

 

http://nautil.us/issue/12/feedback/ants-swarm-like-brains-think ;


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Eli Levine's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:14 AM

Small changes in behavior, thought or action can lead to dramatic changes, in time and with persistence, in the overall quality and function of the brain.

 

Imagine if we worked to heal each other and ourselves of our delusions, illusions, false perceptions, misconceptions, anger, depression, anxiety, etc?  What if we invented machines that could help us correct our brains' function, must like how we use glasses or hearing aids to correct our senses?

 

Consciousness must flow through the biological infrastructure of the brain.  You alter that in a majority of the people of this planet, you technically alter the entirety of the universe (although, I would add, that theoretically that higher level of conscious state had always been present, and that it is we who are arriving at it in our perceptions, while the essential universe itself remains unchanged).  This means that we'd simply be adapting to the universe in a more positive fashion, rather than actually altering it; conforming more to its natural law than shifting the paradigm of our existence on this planet, in this place.

 

Cool cool stuff here.

 

Think about it.

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War, space, and the evolution of Old World complex societies

How did human societies evolve from small groups, integrated by face-to-face cooperation, to huge anonymous societies of today? Why is there so much variation in the ability of different human populations to construct viable states? We developed a model that uses cultural evolution mechanisms to predict where and when the largest-scale complex societies should have arisen in human history. The model was simulated within a realistic landscape of the Afroeurasian landmass, and its predictions were tested against real data. Overall, the model did an excellent job predicting empirical patterns. Our results suggest a possible explanation as to why a long history of statehood is positively correlated with political stability, institutional quality, and income per capita.

 

War, space, and the evolution of Old World complex societies
Peter Turchin, Thomas E. Currie, Edward A. L. Turner, and Sergey Gavrilets

http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1308825110
PNAS September 23, 2013


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Yannis Corovesis's curator insight, October 4, 2013 10:01 AM

Peter Turchin is the son of Valentin Fiodorovitch

Thomas Owens's curator insight, January 25, 2014 12:47 AM

I wish I had more time to study this so I'm going to mark it.

Rescooped by Ricardo Reis from Papers
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Default Cascades in Complex Networks: Topology and Systemic Risk

The recent crisis has brought to the fore a crucial question that remains still open: what would be the optimal architecture of financial systems? We investigate the stability of several benchmark topologies in a simple default cascading dynamics in bank networks. We analyze the interplay of several crucial drivers, i.e., network topology, banks' capital ratios, market illiquidity, and random vs targeted shocks. We find that, in general, topology matters only – but substantially – when the market is illiquid. No single topology is always superior to others. In particular, scale-free networks can be both more robust and more fragile than homogeneous architectures. This finding has important policy implications. We also apply our methodology to a comprehensive dataset of an interbank market from 1999 to 2011.

 

Default Cascades in Complex Networks: Topology and Systemic Risk
Tarik Roukny, Hugues Bersini, Hugues Pirotte, Guido Caldarelli & Stefano Battiston

Scientific Reports 3, Article number: 2759 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep02759


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Identifying the meaning of words with multiple meanings, without using their semantic context

Identifying the meaning of words with multiple meanings, without using their semantic context | Complex systems | Scoop.it
Two Brazilian physicists have devised a method to automatically elucidate the meaning of words with several senses, based solely on their patterns of connectivity with nearby words in a given sentence – and not on semantics.

Via Pierre Levy
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