Complex Networks ...
Follow
3.8K views | +0 today
Complex Networks Everywhere
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Pisa 2012 results: which country does best at reading, maths and science?

Pisa 2012 results: which country does best at reading, maths and science? | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

How do countries compare for reading, maths and science performance? The latest Pisa results from the OECD show which countries are making the biggest improvements and which could do better.

Since 2000, the OECD has attempted to evaluate the knowledge and skills of 15-year olds across the world through its Pisa test. More than 510,000 students in 65 economies took part in the latest test, which covered maths, reading and science, with the main focus on maths - which the OECD state is a "strong predictor of participation in post-secondary education and future success."

The triennial results provide a wealth of data - from which countries are making the biggest improvements in education ranking to how the gender gap varies by subject.


Via NESS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Chaos from Complexity Explorer

Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Chaos from Complexity Explorer | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it
In this course you'll gain an introduction to the modern study of dynamical systems, the interdisciplinary field of applied mathematics that studies systems that change over time.

Via Complejidady Economía, NESS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Artificial Economics 2014 - AE 2014

The main aim of the Symposium is to facilitate the meeting of people working on different topics in different fields (mainly Economics, Finance and Computer Science) in order to encourage a structured multi-disciplinary approach to social sciences. Presentations and keynote sessions center around multi-agent modelling, from the viewpoint of both applications and computer-based tools. The event is also open to methodological surveys.

The event will be hosted by Social Simulation 2014, the 10th Conference of the European Social Simulation Association at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
September 1-5th, 2014.

http://essa2014.org


Via Complexity Digest, NESS
more...
ComplexInsight's curator insight, December 11, 2013 6:50 AM

bookmarking so can come back and read later.

ComplexInsight's curator insight, January 2, 2014 3:43 AM

Understanding how to simulate economic and social systems will be critical in future planning and analysis tools- The Social Simulation 2014 conference will be a key event. 

Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
Scoop.it!

Systems thinking and courage | Rethinking Complexity

Systems thinking and courage | Rethinking Complexity | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

In all the books and research papers on systems thinking that I have read, I don't think I have yet found the word courage as part of the language used. There is a lot written about systems thinking in terms of it's relevance and importance, it's theories and methodologies, but nothing about what it takes--emotionally. And I'm convinced: systems thinking not only requires skill, it also takes courage.


Via Flora Moon, Christophe Bredillet, Bernard Ryefield
more...
David Hain's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:51 AM

Corage is easier when shared purpose lights the flame!

Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
Scoop.it!

Sociality influences cultural complexity

Sociality influences cultural complexity | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

Archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence suggests a link between a population's size and structure, and the diversity or sophistication of its toolkits or technologies. Addressing these patterns, several evolutionary models predict that both the size and social interconnectedness of populations can contribute to the complexity of its cultural repertoire. Some models also predict that a sudden loss of sociality or of population will result in subsequent losses of useful kills/technologies. Here, we test these predictions with two experiments that permit learners to access either one or five models (teachers). Experiment 1 demonstrates that naive participants who could observe five models, integrate this information and generate increasingly effective skills (using an image editing tool) over 10 laboratory generations, whereas those with access to only one model show no improvement. Experiment 2, which began with a generation of trained experts, shows how learners with access to only one model lose skills (in knot-tying) more rapidly than those with access to five models. In the final generation of both experiments, all participants with access to five models demonstrate superior skills to those with access to only one model. These results support theoretical predictions linking sociality to cumulative cultural evolution.

 

 


Via Bernard Ryefield
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

How You Can Train Your Mind To Do The Impossible

How You Can Train Your Mind To Do The Impossible | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

We know that the human brain is a powerful organ, but many of us aren't aware of how much the mind is truly capable of -- and much more powerful it can become through deliberate training. By exercising the brain (yes, you can use repetition and habit as you do when you exercise the body), we can achieve what may have previously seemed nearly impossible.

 

A multitude of studies have linked meditation with both physical and mental health benefits, from reduced depression and anxiety to improved immune system functioning. And thanks to a line of research that looks at the brain power of of Buddhist monks -- who have devoted their lives to the practice of meditation, compassion and non-attachment -- we now know that the brain changes that result from years of mindfulness practices can be staggering.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Papers
Scoop.it!

Contagion of Cooperation in Static and Fluid Social Networks

Cooperation is essential for successful human societies. Thus, understanding how cooperative and selfish behaviors spread from person to person is a topic of theoretical and practical importance. Previous laboratory experiments provide clear evidence of social contagion in the domain of cooperation, both in fixed networks and in randomly shuffled networks, but leave open the possibility of asymmetries in the spread of cooperative and selfish behaviors. Additionally, many real human interaction structures are dynamic: we often have control over whom we interact with. Dynamic networks may differ importantly in the goals and strategic considerations they promote, and thus the question of how cooperative and selfish behaviors spread in dynamic networks remains open. Here, we address these questions with data from a social dilemma laboratory experiment. We measure the contagion of both cooperative and selfish behavior over time across three different network structures that vary in the extent to which they afford individuals control over their network ties. We find that in relatively fixed networks, both cooperative and selfish behaviors are contagious. In contrast, in more dynamic networks, selfish behavior is contagious, but cooperative behavior is not: subjects are fairly likely to switch to cooperation regardless of the behavior of their neighbors. We hypothesize that this insensitivity to the behavior of neighbors in dynamic networks is the result of subjects’ desire to attract new cooperative partners: even if many of one’s current neighbors are defectors, it may still make sense to switch to cooperation. We further hypothesize that selfishness remains contagious in dynamic networks because of the well-documented willingness of cooperators to retaliate against selfishness, even when doing so is costly. These results shed light on the contagion of cooperative behavior in fixed and fluid networks, and have implications for influence-based interventions aiming at increasing cooperative behavior.

 

Jordan JJ, Rand DG, Arbesman S, Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2013) Contagion of Cooperation in Static and Fluid Social Networks. PLoS ONE 8(6): e66199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0066199


Via Complexity Digest
more...
wintrotech's curator insight, September 21, 2013 7:40 AM

the new domain hasing and domain selection is always help in good domain rankinh.

Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

Short Course on Complexity: Exploring Complex Networks

Short Course on Complexity: Exploring Complex Networks | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

September 4-6, 2013
Austin, Texas

http://www.santafe.edu/education/schools/short-course-complexity/

 

This two-and-a-half day introductory course focuses on the science of networks: a new field that studies common principles of complex networks across disciplines. Social and economic networks, food webs, the World Wide Web, and the power grid are examples of the kinds of systems that network science seeks to understand. In this course, taught by prominent Santa Fe Institute faculty and associates, you will learn the basic concepts and tools of this new science, and see several case studies of their application in diverse areas. You will also have the opportunity for discussion with the faculty and other participants about applications within your own areas of interest. You will come away with an understanding and appreciation of the importance of network science for biology, ecology, economics, business, human health, social life, and other pursuits.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Talks
Scoop.it!

The Signal and The Noise


Nate Silver reveals why most predictions fail, and shows how we can isolate a true "signal" from a universe of increasingly big and noisy data.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
Scoop.it!

If A Network Is Broken, Break It More - PhysicsCentral.com (blog)

If A Network Is Broken, Break It More - PhysicsCentral.com (blog) | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it
If A Network Is Broken, Break It More
PhysicsCentral.com (blog)
Why is it so important to manipulate networks?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
Scoop.it!

Pattern Based Graph Generator

 Pattern Based Graph Generator. (arXiv:1303.0157v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED) http://t.co/0dmsyg9aST #physics #society

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
Scoop.it!

A collective opinion formation model under Bayesian updating and confirmation bias

 A collective opinion formation model under Bayesian updating and confirmation ... http://t.co/Hrro8PkgwP…;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
Scoop.it!

Dynamics On and Of Complex Networks, Volume 2 - Applications to Time-Varying Dynamical Systems

Dynamics On and Of Complex Networks, Volume 2 - Applications to Time-Varying Dynamical Systems | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it
This self-contained book systematically explores the statistical dynamics on and of complex networks with a special focus on time-varying networks. In the constantly changing modern world, there is an urgent need to understand ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Charts of economic development: a fantastic journey

Charts of economic development: a fantastic journey | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

Venezuelan economist Ricardo Hausmann and Chilean physicist César Hidalgo, in a joint effort of Harvard University and the Massachutes Institute of Technology MIT, draw a new world map of economic adventure, and suggest the Earth may not be flat.


Via NESS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Phys. Rev. X 3, 041022 (2013): Mathematical Formulation of Multilayer Networks

Phys. Rev. X 3, 041022 (2013): Mathematical Formulation of Multilayer Networks | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

Describing a social network based on a particular type of human social interaction, say, Facebook, is conceptually simple: a set of nodes representing the people involved in such a network, linked by their Facebook connections. But, what kind of network structure would one have if all modes of social interactions between the same people are taken into account and if one mode of interaction can influence another? Here, the notion of a “multiplex” network becomes necessary. Indeed, the scientific interest in multiplex networks has recently seen a surge. However, a fundamental scientific language that can be used consistently and broadly across the many disciplines that are involved in complex systems research was still missing. This absence is a major obstacle to further progress in this topical area of current interest. In this paper, we develop such a language, employing the concept of tensors that is widely used to describe a multitude of degrees of freedom associated with a single entity.

Our tensorial formalism provides a unified framework that makes it possible to describe both traditional “monoplex” (i.e., single-type links) and multiplex networks. Each type of interaction between the nodes is described by a single-layer network. The different modes of interaction are then described by different layers of networks. But, a node from one layer can be linked to another node in any other layer, leading to “cross talks” between the layers. High-dimensional tensors naturally capture such multidimensional patterns of connectivity. Having first developed a rigorous tensorial definition of such multilayer structures, we have also used it to generalize the many important diagnostic concepts previously known only to traditional monoplex networks, including degree centrality, clustering coefficients, and modularity.

We think that the conceptual simplicity and the fundamental rigor of our formalism will power the further development of our understanding of multiplex networks.


Via NESS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

A Science of Cities

A Science of Cities | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

"In this book, I suggest that to understand cities we must view them not simply as places in space but as systems of networks and flows. To understand space, we must understand flows, and to understand flows, we must understand networks—the relations between objects that comprise the system of the city. Drawing on the complexity sciences, social physics, urban economics, transportation theory, regional science, and urban geography, , I introduce theories and methods that reveal the deep structure of how cities function. (...)" Michael Batty


Via NESS
more...
luiy's curator insight, November 23, 2013 6:37 AM

“Michael Batty has followed a career that has made him the prime interpreter of urban modeling in all its forms. Now his remarkable work has become the foundation of a new science of urban flows and networks that uses big data and sharp theory as tools to dig deep into how and what cities are, and how they can be designed in better ways. This is the book that sets the benchmark that all others will have to follow.” —Nigel Thrift, Vice-Chancellor, University of Warwick

mtmeme's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:31 PM

If put into the global Internet of complexity, understanding the workings of cities could let us see how local shifts influence the global conditions, and vice versa. 

Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

Ants 2014: Ninth International Conference on Swarm Intelligence

Ants 2014: Ninth International Conference on Swarm Intelligence | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

September10-12,  2014.  Brussels, Belgium

http://iridia.ulb.ac.be/ants2014

 

Swarm intelligence is a relatively new discipline that deals with the study of self-organizing processes both in nature and in artificial systems. Researchers in ethology and animal behavior have proposed many models to explain interesting aspects of social insect behavior such as self-organization and shape-formation. Recently, algorithms inspired by these models have been proposed to solve difficult computational problems.
An example of a particularly successful research direction in swarm intelligence is ant colony optimization, the main focus of which is on discrete optimization problems. Ant colony optimization has been applied successfully to a large number of difficult discrete optimization problems including the traveling salesman problem, the quadratic assignment problem, scheduling, vehicle routing, etc., as well as to routing in telecommunication networks. Another interesting approach is that of particle swarm optimization, that focuses on continuous optimization problems. Here too, a number of successful applications can be found in the recent literature. Swarm robotics is another relevant field. Here, the focus is on applying swarm intelligence techniques to the control of large groups of cooperating autonomous robots.

ANTS 2014 will give researchers in swarm intelligence the opportunity to meet, to present their latest research, and to discuss current developments and applications.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
june holley's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:07 AM

This would be so interesting!

Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Generating functionals for guided self-organization

Time evolution equations for dynamical systems can often be derived from generating functionals. Examples are Newton's equations of motion in classical dynamics which can be generated within the Lagrange or the Hamiltonian formalism. We propose that generating functionals for self-organizing complex systems offer several advantages. Generating functionals allow to formulate complex dynamical systems systematically and the results obtained are typically valid for classes of complex systems, as defined by the type of their respective generating functionals. The generated dynamical systems tend, in addition, to be minimal, containing only few free and undetermined parameters. We point out that two or more generating functionals may be used to define a complex system and that multiple generating function may not, and should not, be combined into a single overall objective function. We provide and discuss examples in terms of adapting neural networks.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

The Power of Networks

The Power of Networks | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

Nowadays, any organization should employ network scientists/analysts who are able to map and analyse complex systems that are of importance to the organization (e.g. the organization itself, its activities, a country’s economic activities, transportation networks, research networks).Interconnectivity is beneficial but also brings in vulnerability: if you and I are connected we can share resources; meanwhile your problems can become mine and vice versa.The concept of “crystallized imagination” refers to things that are first in our head and then become reality. This concept can be turned into network applied research on economic complexity of a country’s economic activities and development prospects.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Social Networking in the 1600s

Social Networking in the 1600s | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it

SOCIAL networks stand accused of being enemies of productivity. According to one popular (if questionable) infographiccirculating online, the use of Facebook, Twitter and other such sites at work costs the American economy $650 billion each year. Our attention spans are atrophying, our test scores declining, all because of these “weapons of mass distraction.”

 

Yet such worries have arisen before. In England in the late 1600s, very similar concerns were expressed about another new media-sharing environment, the allure of which seemed to be undermining young people’s ability to concentrate on their studies or their work: the coffeehouse. It was the social-networking site of its day.

 

Like coffee itself, coffeehouses were an import from the Arab world. England’s first coffeehouse opened in Oxford in the early 1650s, and hundreds of similar establishments sprang up in London and other cities in the following years. People went to coffeehouses not just to drink coffee, but to read and discuss the latest pamphlets and news-sheets and to catch up on rumor and gossip.

 

Coffeehouses were also used as post offices. Patrons would visit their favorite coffeehouses several times a day to check for new mail, catch up on the news and talk to other coffee drinkers, both friends and strangers. Some coffeehouses specialized in discussion of particular topics, like science, politics, literature or shipping. As customers moved from one to the other, information circulated with them.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 27, 2013 8:11 AM
Living in the Past

 

Jethro Tull
Rescooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro from morphogenesis and emergence
Scoop.it!

Benoit Mandelbrot - Hunting the Hidden Dimension Nova (2008)

Telling the story of Fractal Geometry, till its usage in complexity theory, very nicely done.

For centuries, fractal-like irregular shapes were considered beyond the boundaries of mathematical understanding. Now, mathematicians have finally begun mapping this uncharted territory. Their remarkable findings are deepening our understanding of nature and stimulating a new wave of scientific, medical, and artistic innovation stretching from the ecology of the rain forest to fashion design. The documentary highlights a host of filmmakers, fashion designers, physicians, and researchers who are using fractal geometry to innovate and inspire.


Via starwalker
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
Scoop.it!

Microchips that mimic the brain: Novel microchips imitate the brain's ... - Science Daily (press release)

Microchips that mimic the brain: Novel microchips imitate the brain's ... - Science Daily (press release) | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it
Science World Report
Microchips that mimic the brain: Novel microchips imitate the brain's ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
Scoop.it!

Building 3-D fractals on a nanoscale: Structure repeats itself from ...

Building 3-D fractals on a nanoscale: Structure repeats itself from ... | Complex Networks Everywhere | Scoop.it
It all starts with a single octahedron structure, then after four iterations there are already 625 of them. Each iteration creates a new octahedron at each vertex. The result is a fascinating 3D fractal construction on micro and ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A. J. Alvarez-Socorro
Scoop.it!

Transaction Costs and Shadow Prices in Discrete Time

 Transaction Costs and Shadow Prices in Discrete Time. (arXiv:1205.4643v2 [q-... http://t.co/Uo12ThgIwW

more...
No comment yet.