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Competitive Edge
Creating your Unique Value Proposition to gain your Competitive Edge.
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This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it

This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

The hardest part of any new product launch is the beginning, when it’s not quite working, and you’re iterating and molding the experience to fix it. It may be the hardest phase, but it’s also the most fun. The Product Death Cycle All of this was on my mind when I saw a great tweet from  about a year ago, on the Product Death Cycle, when things go wrong. David Bland, a management consultant based in San Francisco, tweeted this diagram:

This is what I’m calling the Product Death Cycle
– @davidjbland

A year ago when I saw this, I retweeted this diagram right away, and a year later, it’s hit 1,400+ RTs overall. This diagram has resonated with a ton of people because sadly, we’ve seen this Product Death Cycle happen many times. We’ve maybe even fallen into it ourselves – it’s all too easy. I’ve written about this phase before, in After the Techcrunch bump: Life in the Trough of Sorrow.  As well as some thoughts and strategies related to getting to product/market fit sooner rather than later.

Let’s talk about each step of this cycle, why it happens, and present a list of questions/provocations that might allow us to escape.

Read more: click image or title.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great analysis by Andrew Chen. Create that business model that keeps on producing new clients.

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Develop an experience, not just a product | The Venture Company

Develop an experience, not just a product | The Venture Company | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

My 3-year-old daughter uses my iPhone to play music videos and YouTube videos and has not touched a PC (or better, a Mac) yet. With the same content available on either she's obviously seen me operate my Mac and looks over my shoulder now and then, but finds all the keys and even the "Magic-mouse" complicated. Clearly a usage experience is more important to her than sheer processing power. Sounds familiar doesn't it? Nintendo anyone? What I see in so many early business plans today is the old-fashioned notion of deep technology expertise, something most traditional investors still harp on. I see too many BMW engines being developed without attention being paid to the development of The Ultimate Driving Experience®. True, you can't build the driving experience without great engines, but BMW, like no other vendor understands that the total experience is the selling point. In the end, technology will become commoditized and its differentiation will be determined by the way it interacts...

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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Excellent observation. Keeping this in mind will create very loyal customers. This is an older article, but still very essential for any kind of business.

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The 50% Rule for Traction

The 50% Rule for Traction | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

http://snip.ly/naLT

If you’re starting a company, chances are you can build a product. Almost every failed startup has a product.

What failed startups don’t have are enough customers.

Marc Andreessen, founder of Netscape and VC firm Andreessen-Horowitz, sums up this problem:

“The number one reason that we pass on entrepreneurs we’d otherwise like to back is their focusing on product to the exclusion of everything else. Many entrepreneurs who build great products simply don’t have a good distribution strategy. Even worse is when they insist that they don’t need one, or call [their] no distribution strategy a ‘viral marketing strategy.’”

A common story goes like this: founders build something people want by following a sound product development strategy. They spend their time building new features early users say they want.

Then, after months of heads-down product development, they launch, only to become frustrated when customers don’t flock to them.

(This is guest post by Justin Mares, Co-author of Traction. If you build a great product in the forest, it will die too in the forest, unless you also build inroads to your product.
In this post, Justin shares this key lesson for when and how to pursue channel building while running lean.
Enjoy…  Read more:
http://snip.ly/naLT



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Debra Soto
Freeballer Surfwear

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Develop a product and don't forget the marketing. Start doing it at the same time is the idea of this article. The 50% rule makes a lot of sense.

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