Competitive Edge
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Competitive Edge
Creating your Unique Value Proposition to gain your Competitive Edge.
Curated by Marc Kneepkens
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How to Make a Proposal That Seals the Deal

How to Make a Proposal That Seals the Deal | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

The almighty proposal (or estimate) can be one of the most stressful and time-consuming chores of running your business. Yet it’s a necessary evil: Proposals seal the deal.

 

A well-constructed proposal will manage a client’s expectations, give you an opportunity to present your fee without having an awkward conversation, and serve as an official agreement in the relationship (however, it doesn’t replace a contract). In other words, it’s a sales tool that will win you business

Here are four steps to crafting a killer proposal. Read more: click image or title.

 

 

Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.l/1aKy7km


Via Deb Bailey
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Improve your #proposals.

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7 Public Speaking Fundamentals to Master

7 Public Speaking Fundamentals to Master | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

One day you may deliver a speech to potential investors, clients or your peers at an industry conference. Are you ready?

Public speaking is often associated with a kind of grandiosity, as if you need to be a guest of honor at a formal event, to employ what we think of as “public speaking skills.” In reality, though, public speaking skills are used all the time, in multiple contexts. As an entrepreneur, you’ll be tapping into many of those contexts.

For example, you’ll be giving presentations to potential investors and clients. You’ll be doling out numbers and giving updates to your team. You might even be an interviewee in the media or a speaker for a major event. Whether you plan on speaking publicly on a regular basis or not, you’ll need to prepare yourself to speak as an entrepreneur, using these seven important public speaking fundamentals: Read more: click image or title.

 

 

Learn more about funding, find great funding sources, get a free business plan template, post your funding request for free, and more: www.Business-Funding-Insider.com


Via Daniel Watson, massimo facchinetti
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

There will be times in your life where you have to address a public. Here are some good tips that can help overcome the fear and improve your connection.

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pertinentapplied's comment, April 22, 6:35 AM
Genius.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 22, 6:55 AM
Speak in Public is a very important topic and often overlooked by business professionals. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about business competencies can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Tamsen Fadal's comment, April 25, 4:31 AM
Nice work
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Want to rock your next presentation? Consider asking a question.

An expert on public speaking explains how to become a more compelling--and confident--presenter by asking, not telling in the right situations.

Of all the tools and techniques a speaker can use to make a presentation more effective, the simple question is the most versatile. Think of it as the Swiss Army Knife of presenting. A well-timed question can accomplish a myriad of communication tasks, from building intrigue to fostering audience engagement, helping you remember what to say, and even calming your speaking anxiety. Leverage questions, and you can become a more compelling and confident presenter. Here's how:

Questions Connect with the Audience

Audience connection is the key characteristic that distinguishes a memorable presenter from an average one. Are audience members participating with the speaker, or simply listening to the speaker? Questions provide a great way to foster engagement. Questions by their very nature are dialogic. They're two-way: You ask and your audience responds. I recommend using three types of questions throughout your presentation to get your audience's attention:

Rhetorical questions build intrigue.

Asking your audience a question for effect (rather than one you expect them to actually answer) prompts them to think about the issue.

Example: "Would you believe that companies are making robotic honeybees to pollinate crops in locales where bees are dying off?"Polling questions make the audience part of your point.

When asking your audience to respond to your query, be sure to signal how you want them to do so (e.g., model raising your hand as you ask your question, or explain how the online poll works if you are virtually presenting) and comment briefly on the response you get (e.g., "Just as I expected, about 50% of you … ").

Example: "How many of you have ever been stung by a honeybee?"

"What if?" questions root your presentation in time.

Inquire about a possible future or the historical past; and as with rhetorical questions, you may not expect a literal response, but you definitely focus your audience’s attention on the time period you’re describing.

Example: "What would it be like if all crops were pollinated by robo-honeybees?" Or, "Remember when modern science made it possible for genetically modified vegetables to yield more crops?"

Questions Build Your Confidence

Many speakers are anxious because they feel they are under the harsh spotlight of an audience who is constantly evaluating them. But, interestingly, incorporating questions from the moment you start planning can help you feel more confident about every aspect of presenting. Here are two ways to use questions in planning to improve your delivery:

Ask yourself, "What does my audience need to hear from me?"

Instead of seeing speaking as a performance, think of it as being in service of your audience's needs--this shifts the attention away from you and onto your audience. The most useful way I know to focus on your audience is to start by asking yourself the simple question: "What does my audience need to hear from me?" This not only helps you tailor your message to your audience, but it also reminds you that they are the ones in the spotlight. Make this question your mantra as you prepare and practice your presentations.

Outline your talk using questions.

When writing your next outline, create a list of questions to serve as prompts for what you intend to say. I loathe speaking manuscripts and full-text speaker notes, which only invite memorization and actually increase performance anxiety. An outline, on the other hand, is a very practical tool to help speakers prepare and deliver. And the power of a question-based outline is twofold: First, it allows you to feel more confident because you know the answers to your questions--you no longer need to worry you might not know what to say. Second, you will be more conversational, since you are simply answering your audience's unasked questions, and conversational delivery is often better remembered by audiences.

When you next face preparing for and delivering a presentation, consider using the MacGyver of communication tools, the question. For just about any task at hand, it can yield all kinds of benefits for you and your audience.


Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km



Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Present better, here are some good tips.

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5 Things Every Presenter Should Know About People, Animated

5 Things Every Presenter Should Know About People, Animated | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
On the art of moving words that move people.

"The human brain starts working the moment you are born and never stops until you stand up t
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

This is excellent. Ever been worried about public speaking or presenting? Watch this.



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How to Make a Great First Impression: 11 Things Sincerely Polite People Never Do

How to Make a Great First Impression: 11 Things Sincerely Polite People Never Do | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
Want to make a great first impression--and keep on making a great impression? Here's how.

While you meet a lot of people, occasionally you meet a person who stands out. She might be remarkably charismatic. He might be extremely charming and likable. She might be extremely confident, in a genuine and therefore positive way.

People who stand out for positive reasons aren't just memorable, though--they're also people we want to work with and do business with.

And that's why genuinely polite people stand out. (Not fake polite--sincere polite.) They make us feel comfortable. They make us feel respected and valued. We want to be more like them.

And we want to do business with them.

Here's what polite people never do--and what they do instead: Read more: click image or title.

 

 

Learn more about funding, find great funding sources, get a free business plan template, post your funding request for free, and more: www.Business-Funding-Insider.com

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Why are we drawn to certain people from the very first moment we meet them? This article sheds some light on that.

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5 Quotes From Billionaire Mark Cuban That Will Inspire You To Work Your Ass Off

5 Quotes From Billionaire Mark Cuban That Will Inspire You To Work Your Ass Off | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
“Work like there is someone working 24 hours a day to take it away from you.”

Mark Cuban is oddly inspiring, not only due to the amount of money he has been able to accumulate, or the fact that he owns the Dallas Mavericks, but also for his insight.

Each quote below encompasses how the man continues to brilliantly enhance his image and empire while also reminding us that hard work and determination do actually pay off.

Read more: click image or title.




Learn more about funding, find great funding sources, get free business plan template, post your funding request for free, and more:

www.Business-Funding-Insider.com


Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Not your classic inspiring #quotes, but straight to the point.

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Seven Ways to Make a Great First Impression.

Seven Ways to Make a Great First Impression. | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

Whether you’re a social being who loves meeting new people, or someone who’s more reflective and private, we all need to make a good first impression. Why? Because first impressions are key to building lasting trust. And trust as we know, is the cornerstone to doing good business.

Social psychologist Amy Cuddy says that when we meet someone new, our natural tendency is to want to show them how strong and competent we are. In reality, what people are really looking for is how warm and trustworthy we might be.

Most of what you need to make a good first impression is common sense. But these simple and practical tips and techniques will show you how to come across as your true, trustworthy and confident self.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km


Via Daniel Watson, Alain Theriault MBA
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Alain Theriault MBA's curator insight, May 15, 2014 11:33 AM

Yes it's back to basics but, if you think you are not making a good impression as you would like, take a good hard look at each of these and ask yourself, which one you should improve on!

Chuck Devers's curator insight, May 19, 2014 8:09 AM

First impressions are critical- Remember, you can't "Un-ring the bell"

Joy Moore's curator insight, May 22, 2014 7:46 PM

Great tips for both interviews and networking