Competitive Edge
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Competitive Edge
Creating your Unique Value Proposition to gain your Competitive Edge.
Curated by Marc Kneepkens
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11 Secrets for Hiring Top Candidates Most Search Firms Won’t Tell You

11 Secrets for Hiring Top Candidates Most Search Firms Won’t Tell You | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

Rogue Recruiter David. E. Perry shares inside information on how to hire the best.

Hiring is never easy. Hiring for a key executive position is one of the most difficult things you'll ever do as a leader. "Most decisions a business makes are small.," says David E. Perry, co-author of Hiring Greatness: How to Recruit Your Dream Team and Crush the Competition and an expert with more than 30 years of experience who's been dubbed "The Rogue Recruiter" in the press. "A single sale or interaction doesn't add that much value to a small business, or damage it much if it goes wrong," he says. "Hiring an executive is different. That can make or break an organization."

A star employee can catapult your company to new heights by increasing sales, boosting productivity, finding new markets or directions, or creating new innovations, he adds. On the other hand, "a bad hire may mortally wound a small business."

As if that weren't challenging enough, in today's tight labor market, competition for key talent is fierce. This is why large companies with deep pockets pay hefty sums to executive search firms in the hopes of bringing in the kind of talent that can help the company grow. What if you don't have the cash it takes to hire a great search firm? You can do a lot of the things a search firm would do for you, Perry says. Follow these steps, and you'll dramatically increase your chances of hiring a winner every single time. Read more: click image or title.

 

 

FREE Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km

 


Via Enzo Calamo
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

These are very general tips. They make sense, but the real #hiring experts use very advanced technology to access #data and connect with candidates. If you need help recruiting, contact me @MarcKneepkens or via my website www.business-funding-insider.com via the Contact Us page.

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3 Ways Startups Can Accomplish More With Less | Inc.com

3 Ways Startups Can Accomplish More With Less | Inc.com | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
Rather than chasing gobs of capital, early-stage startups should chase capital efficiency - or doing more with less.

In the age of unicorns, startups that are increasingly reaching valuations of over $1 billion, it's easy for entrepreneurs to get caught up in chasing as much capital as they can raise - often more than they actually need in order to maintain and scale their operations.

As the CEO and co-founder of an emerging growth company that just raised a Series B, I understand where the desire comes from. Without a healthy supply of capital, a startup can't grow.

But rather than chasing gobs of capital, I would advise early-stage startups to chase capital efficiency - that is, doing more with less. In addition to burning less capital, it has the benefit of instilling discipline in the team early, planting the seeds for a company culture that is focused on the long-term. Sean Jacobsohn, a venture investor at Norwest Venture Partners, recently wrote that establishing capital efficiency early and maintaining it to scale helps startups develop passionate, insightful leadership, in addition to a targeted and loyal customer base.

Here are three of the most important things I've learned as an entrepreneur about capital efficiency that any startup leader can apply. All of these boil down to one common theme: the importance of embracing capital scarcity. Read more: click image or title.




Learn more about funding, find great funding sources, get a free business plan template, post your funding request for free, and more:

www.Business-Funding-Insider.com

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

3 tips that make a lot of sense, excellent for business, #learningcurve and best #practices.

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The Top Jobs In 10 Years Might Not Be What You Expect

The Top Jobs In 10 Years Might Not Be What You Expect | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
We talked to three futurists to find out what the hot jobs of 2025 could be, and their answers may surprise you.

For decades, the U.S. Bureau of Labor’s Economic and Employment Projections have been the bellwether for predicting what the hottest jobs up to a decade out would be. But with the rapid pace of technological change disrupting industries faster than ever before (think: robotics, 3-D printing, the sharing economy), it’s becoming obvious to many futurists that past trends may no longer be a reliable indicator of future job prospects.

"In the last two centuries, we’ve seen two significant shifts in the global labor market," says Graeme Codrington, futurist at TomorrowToday Global. "First we stripped the agricultural sector of workers, and then we did the same to manufacturing. Now the machines are coming for the tertiary sector, and will begin to strip companies of their white-collar workers in the next decade."

What that means, says Codrington, is that some of the hottest jobs of today could be obsolete by 2025 (check out the sidebar to see if yours is on the chopping block). Yet all hope isn’t lost, he says. "History tells us that somehow the labor market creates new jobs whenever it destroys some old ones. While it’s easy to see how the overall job market could contract significantly, and certainly many jobs that exist today will not exist in a decade or two, it’s also quite easy to see myriad new jobs being created."

So just what are the jobs that will be in demand in this brave new world only a decade away? Codrington and two other futurists give us their predictions. Read more: click image or title.





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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Changing and adapting is essential nowadays. Looking forward and predicting what's coming up is not easy. I think this article provides some good information on what's coming up next.

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Scoop.it StartupVitamins: Quotes for Startup

Scoop.it StartupVitamins: Quotes for Startup | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

Startup Vitamins provides inspiration and motivation for startups - and supports them too!
Startup Vitamins is a recently launched project, which offers inspiring posters with sayings from industry leaders such as Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs, Jason Fried, and more.

Profit from sold posters goes towards supporting various organizations, which develop and bring value to the startup community. Currently profits are split between StartupWeekend and Garage48, both of which help ideas come to life around the world


See more Quotes? Want it in your office? Order a Poster, Canvas, Mug, Sticker or Framed Print from StartupVitamins . Click here, support Startups, motivate yourself.

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Another great quote from Herb Kelleher, Southwest Airlines.

You're working with people. It does matter what kind of people they are, they can't just be "high tech robots". People matter.


See more Quotes? Want it in your office? Order a Poster, Canvas, Mug, Sticker or Framed Print from StartupVitamins . Click here, support Startups, motivate yourself.

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Three Failed Entrepreneurs Walk Into a Bar...

Three Failed Entrepreneurs Walk Into a Bar... | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

Once upon a time, there were three entrepreneurs who had just lost their businesses. They all happened to walk, sulking, into the same bar just off of Market St. and Polk St. in San Francisco. The drinks started flowing, and the three began telling each other stories:

Entrepreneur #1: Our business should have changed the world. Seriously, if we had been able to raise just a few million dollars, there would have been no stopping us. But we couldn't raise the funds. And after a while... well... we had to eat, right?

Entrepreneur #2: My company would have been the next unicorn. We had money and traction. But as we got bigger, our investors wanted us to get even bigger... faster. So we came out with new products. But the market didn't take to them. And we couldn't recover.

Entrepreneur #3: We had bad luck too. We were doubling every few months for years. We should have been the next Google. Then our board recommended a hire that we made. And he was political. I'm still not sure how it happened, but the board decided, today, for him to replace me.

The drinks kept flowing. First beers...then shots... then beers with shots inside of them. And the entrepreneurs kept talking. Perhaps it was the alcohol... or perhaps the recognition that they were sitting with human beings who shared their pain... but slowly they began to laugh and feel a bit better.

Then, out of nowhere, an old man approached. The entrepreneurs looked up at the man, blinked, and looked at each other; the old man was glowing like no living person they'd seen. Either he'd been sent from heaven or Mars, or someone had slipped something very strong into their drinks.To read more: click image or title.




Learn more about funding, find great funding sources, get a free business plan template, post your funding request for free, and more:

www.Business-Funding-Insider.com



Via Pantelis Chiotellis
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great story. #Failed #startup #founders can learn something here.

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Thủ Thuật Game - Fun24h's comment, January 19, 5:30 AM
Hướng dẫn cách chơi cờ tướng : http://fun24h.mobi/huong-dan-cach-choi-co-tuong-trong-game-bigkool/
A Subratty's curator insight, January 20, 9:47 AM

He who hasn't failed in life hasn't lived his life. 

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Hire the Right Recent Graduates for Your Startup With These 4 Tips

Hire the Right Recent Graduates for Your Startup With These 4 Tips | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
You may find yourself with an influx of applications from new entrants to the job market. How do you find the best?

One of the most important tasks you will face as a business founder is the recruitment of your first team members. Many founders struggle with this task -- I did when I started my company. Industry veterans might command a salary that you can’t afford, or candidates whose impressive skill sets you can afford may not align with your core values.

Your search for the ideal hire may be further complicated by the rapid influx of recent college graduates into the job market. In the weeks following their May and June graduation ceremonies, you may find dozens -- if not hundreds -- of graduates applying for open positions at your company. Given their relative lack of employment experience, how can you identify the college graduates who are best suited to the swift pace and constantly evolving nature of startup life?

Impressive candidates can come from all sorts of experience levels and ages, so you should try not to limit your search to just one group. If you do, however, choose to pursue recent graduates, here are four pieces of advice that can help identify the right ones to join your team. Read more: click on title or image.





Need funding?

Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.l/1aKy7km

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Hiring great people is a very complicated process. This article provides a few general tips that help. If you're looking for great developers/programmers/engineers... contact me on Linkedin. You can't afford mistakes when it comes to hiring for a startup. Mistakes right at the start can be fatal.

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Hiring startup engineers? Talk about challenge, not pay

Hiring startup engineers? Talk about challenge, not pay | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
Here's what matters most to people when considering a job.

Back when I worked at Microsoft and Amazon, I spent a lot of time hiring and building teams. I had the methodology down: Get referrals from strong people already on the team. Look for someone who is uniquely great at something, preferably something that makes them different from the rest of the team. Don’t let problem personalities past the first step no matter how capable they are.

When I decided to take the leap from the corporate world to starting my own company, I figured hiring would be the easy part. But when I sat down to write the copy for the careers page on our company website, I got stuck. I’d always advised job-seeking friends to choose the manager first and the specific job second. Most of my colleagues looking for jobs in the corporate world would talk about what they were looking for in terms of factors like pay and opportunity for continued advancement.

But the more I talked to people at startups, the less relevant these factors seemed to be. Although several people mentioned the potential long-term payoff of sweat equity, they were mostly not motivated by immediate pay; they would have been working at corporate jobs if they had been. They talked a lot about wanting to be part of a team of smart and collaborative people, but few mentioned direct manager as a consideration. Many of them talked about how much they were learning. I never heard anyone discuss promotions.

We didn’t want to advertise our roles in a way that would attract the wrong candidates — or worse, no candidates at all. We are also huge analysis nerds. We wanted to get beyond the anecdotal conversations. Just as we do for any important product or business decision, we decided to get some data.

We wanted to understand what candidates look for when they visit job listings. And not just any candidates but the particular candidates who fit the profile of people we want to hire. Our career site needs to be true to who we are as a company; it’s important to speak to our genuine values and hiring philosophy. It also needs to speak to the unique concerns of the people we want to hire.

I did a quick survey of nearly 350 developers, designers, technical marketers, product managers, sales leaders, and user researchers who work at a mix of corporations, startups, midsize companies, and nonprofits. Participants answered a single question: what are the top three factors that you look for in a job? I suggested some possible answers with the question, including challenge, pay, location, team, manager, flexibility, social purpose, and specific job description, although respondents were free to add any factors of their choosing.

What I had observed anecdotally showed up in the data. Here are the job selection criteria techies mentioned most often in different kinds of organizations, along with the percentage of respondents who mentioned them:


Everyone cares about things not in their top three list. Few people would turn down great pay on a fun team working towards a cause they believe in. But the data shows interesting and relevant differences between what people in different kinds of organizations care about most.

Manager, scope, and growth are corporate terms. Team, challenge, and learning are their startup equivalents. Corporate workers prioritize immediate pay more highly, while people at startups value flexibility. We realized as we looked through this data that the selling points we have to offer people joining Kidgrid aligned well with the factors that people working in startups value. That made us feel like we were on the right track.

Now that we’re up and running, we’re finding that the people we’re the most interested in are the ones who care about team, challenge, and learning, because those are the things we care about too. That’s true whether they currently work at startups, at corporations, or in some other environment. A good culture fit is just a good culture fit.



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km



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