Competitive Edge
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Competitive Edge
Creating your Unique Value Proposition to gain your Competitive Edge.
Curated by Marc Kneepkens
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7 Marketing Strategies That Don't Scale (But We Did Them Anyways)

7 Marketing Strategies That Don't Scale (But We Did Them Anyways) | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
Looking for the next growth hack? Stop looking. Try these 7 marketing strategies that don't scale instead.

Growing up, I was a really small guy. So after I finished high school, I was eager to hit the gym and pack on some muscle.

As I began lifting weights, I found myself surrounded by people way bigger than me. So in an effort to speed up my progress, I tried to lift as heavy as I could. I also started taking a bunch of supplements I didn’t need. I kept trying to get big fast.

My initial results? Abysmal.

Then a friend of mine said something that changed everything.

Chris… just focus on adding 5 more pounds to the bar every month. If you can do that, you’ll be able to lift 60 more pounds than you can today.

He was totally right… Within less than 2 years, I brought my bench press up from 65 lbs to 135 lbs.

Believe it or not, this same thinking works wonders when applied to business. Getting one new customer a day doesn’t sound like a lot. But when you stack that up over an entire year, you’ll have 365 people paying you money.

So rather than thinking about how to get 365 customers, start by just getting one. Then another. Then another.

Doing things that don’t scale...  Read more: click image or title.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

#Scaling is all the rage these days. This article takes you back to business basics, from #customerservice, to live demos, speaking, conferences, etc. One way or the other, you can 'make' it happen if you really want to.

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Management Be Nimble - NYTimes.com

Management Be Nimble - NYTimes.com | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

“We aspire to be the largest small company in our space.”

When Dominic Orr, the chief executive of Aruba Networks, said those words, he crystallized a goal I had heard many leaders express during the hundreds of interviews I’ve conducted for the Corner Office column: they want to foster a quick and nimble culture, with the enviable qualities of many start-ups, even as their companies grow.

All leaders and managers face this challenge, regardless of the size of their companies. Even the founders of Google have worried about losing the magic that helped propel their search engine’s phenomenal growth. When Larry Page announced that he was taking over the chief-executive role from Eric Schmidt a few years ago, he explained to reporters that the company needed to move faster and recapture the agility of its early days, before it grew into a colossus.

“One of the primary goals I have,” Mr. Page said at the time, “is to get Google to be a big company that has the nimbleness and soul and passion and speed of a start-up.”

To read the full article, click on the title.


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Via Beth Kanter
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Excellent views on how to align people in companies to get focused and treat each other with respect.

The viewpoint of Beth Kanter on email is worthwhile reading too. Email is truly an issue because it is so bland, not only emails in the workplace but also in any kind of human interaction. It's so easy to misinterpret a few words since we ususally project our own images and emotions into the situation. Isn't that why 'emoticons' were invented?

Great article and comment.

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Beth Kanter's curator insight, January 6, 2014 1:40 AM

The Hazards of Email

Bring up the subject of workplace email during conversations with C.E.O.’s, and the mood often shifts. Email is a hot-button issue, and clearly a source of endless frustration.

The problem, of course, is that for all the obvious benefits of email in speeding communication, it is also a dangerous trap. Emails are too easily misinterpreted, with often-disastrous consequences for the culture of an organization, because they can damage whatever connective tissue exists between colleagues. Yet the allure of email is powerful, and people fall repeatedly into the same trap, thinking that email is the best way to accomplish a lot of work in a short time.

Many C.E.O.’s are perceptive observers of the hazards of email, and they establish a variety of rules in their companies to discourage its use and encourage people to talk instead.

“If there’s a conflict and you need to resolve it, you cannot really do it in an email because people don’t know tone,” said Nancy Aossey, chief executive of the International Medical Corps. “They don’t know expression. Even if they like you and they know you, they might not know if you were irritated or joking in an email. There are things we can say in conversation that you can’t say in email because people don’t know tone and expression.

“People change when they talk in person about a problem, not because they chicken out, but because they have the benefit of seeing the person, seeing their reaction, and getting a sense of the person. But arguing over email is about having the last word. It plays into something very dangerous in human behavior. You want to have the last word, and nothing brings that out more than email because you can sit there and hit ‘send,’ and then it just kind of ratchets up and you don’t have the benefit of knowing the tone.”

By talking over the phone or in person, you’ll not only avoid dangerous misunderstandings, but you’ll also develop relationships and a sense of trust with colleagues — essential ingredients in fostering the kind of high-performing culture that drives innovation.

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Top Reasons Why Startups Need Marketing

Top Reasons Why Startups Need Marketing | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

  (Image credit: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Find-you..jpg) Every entrepreneur harbors lofty dreams for his startup. Great businesses find themselves growing mainly because of two reasons. One, they’re creating products and services that people require; two, they’re able to find the people who love their offerings.

All entrepreneurs know how important it is to tell the world about their product, and that is exactly what marketing helps them do. Once you realize its potential, it becomes easier to set and work towards achieving the marketing goals for your company.

Mentioned ahead are a few reasons why your startup really needs marketing. Read more: click image or title.





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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Even the best product or service in the world needs marketing. If no one knows about you, your great idea will not sell. Here is a summary of steps and options to take to do a great job, without having to be a sales person.

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5 Quick Ways to Humanize your Email Marketing - B2C

5 Quick Ways to Humanize your Email Marketing - B2C | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

To read the full article, click on the title.


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https://growthink.infusionsoft.com/go/freebptemplate/gt4045/
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Yes, add in that personal aspect. It is a huge advantage against your corporate competitors. Remember how you respond when you get messages.

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