Competitive Edge
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Competitive Edge
Creating your Unique Value Proposition to gain your Competitive Edge.
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5 Surprising Things Millennials Really Want at Work

5 Surprising Things Millennials Really Want at Work | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
95 percent of Millennials want the option to occasionally work outside the office. Are you providing your employees with that option?

Millennials have been unfairly portrayed as spoiled, lazy, and entitled, but the reality behind this stereotype is much different. Understanding Millennials and the unique qualities they bring with them to the workplace is essential for the long-term success of every business. As Scott Pitasky, Executive Vice President and Chief Partner Resource Officer of Starbucks says, "The workforce of today is more diverse, complex, and challenging than ever before. Over the next 10 years, organizations big and small may succeed or fail based on how they embrace the Millennial generation."

In their book, What Millennials Want from Work, authors Jennifer Deal and Alec Levenson distill the data from surveys of more than 25,000 Millennials in 22 countries to develop a comprehensive, scientifically accurate picture of what really motivates Millennials around the world. According to Deal and Levenson, Millennials want 5 things in particular at work, and if you can provide it, you'll gain their loyalty and engagement. Read more: click image or title.





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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

The #workplace is changing dramatically. #Millennials are showing us the way.

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How to keep your startup spirit when your business takes off

How to keep your startup spirit when your business takes off | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
When DesignMyNight.com grew from two to 20 people in two years, its founders worried the business had lost its spark

ust four years ago, DesignMyNight.com were two people. Two years later we were five, and today, we are 20. Just four years ago we were working from Starbucks. Today, we are in an Old Street open-plan warehouse office space. The journey has been short but the expansion has been big.

Last week my business co-founder Andrew and I sat down and wondered if we had lost our startup spirit. As a brand new company, it was easy to get washed away with the excitement of being a startup – few bills to pay, few clients to worry about, only a few new members of the team. This was why we left our corporate snooze jobs; working hard for the boss wasn’t cutting it for us.

Two years on, we had a serious discussion about whether this was going to work and as fate would have it, an angel landed in our lap. A group of angel investors, in fact, who decided to invest £250,000 into our dream. While this was obviously life-changing for us, it also quickly changed our startup dynamic. Suddenly we had to put together serious five-year plans, forecasts, cashflow projections and growth strategies … and, moreover, had to be accountable for them.

This of course brings a whole new excitement to the table too. We were now in a position to create a viable company and one that could grow quickly, and here we had angel investors – of Friends Reunited, Yell.com, Vodafone and Quidco fame – all believing in the business plan. The startup engines were on fire, with a fancy new office, 10 hires and a sizeable marketing budget to play with. The following year saw a further £250,000 invested allowing us to grow to a team of 20 with an even fancier office and managing to poach talent from the likes of Google and Accenture.

After four years of strong growth, we witnessed more and more desks filling the office, HR policies being put in place, new managerial structures, but fewer opportunities for impromptu fun nights out with the team (after all we had budgets to stick to). The lack of atmosphere became noticeable. Our fantastic team had joined DesignMyNight because of the whirlwind fun and unpredictability of a startup, and we had lost that spirit.

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At a startup, your most important asset is your team. For our team, DesignMyNight is their baby as well as ours and we’d forgotten to keep the dialogue open with them. We had an open lunch with the team to ask them what they wanted and a few weeks later we had installed a ping pong table, darts board, new lounge/chill out area, regular top-ups of fruit, tea and coffee. We started having more regular team nights out, and handed the office decoration over to them. We were reminded to thank and praise the team more than we did, and began announcing “weekly wins” and wind down Fridays (where we shut laptops at 5pm and enjoy each other’s company, and a few cocktails), as well as randomly rewarding the teams with lunches and gifts if there had been noticeable achievement.

These simple, yet inexpensive, improvements instantly re-injected the team and the office with that entrepreneurial startup spirit again. A happier team equals better results. As founders of a new business it is vital to remember why you entered this crazy startup world … because it shouldn’t be simply for the money.

You must regularly step back from the pressures of targets and have fun: enjoy the job, enjoy the emotional rollercoaster, enjoy the freedom and most of all enjoy your team, otherwise you might as well go back to that snoozy corporate job.

Nick Telson is co-founder of www.designmynight.com


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Via Zonata
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great story. Keep that spirit alive, but don't be foolish.

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Why our startup has no bosses, no office, and a four-day work week - Quartz

Why our startup has no bosses, no office, and a four-day work week - Quartz | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

As Paul Graham, entrepreneur, programmer and also founder of YCombinator used to say: “For a programmer, the cost of attending a meeting is always higher.”


In 2008, my study partner Hernán Amiune and I had finished studying computer engineer at Catholic University of Córdoba Argentina.

During our last years at university, we had done some internships in companies such as HP, IBM, and Intel. It was the moment we realized there was a mistake in their work methods.

We couldn’t understand why people without technical knowledge had to tell programmers “what” to do and, furthermore, they had to supervise “how” programmers did it.


So, when we created Project eMT, a comparison search engine for Latin America, we decided to work in a different way: without project managers. Six years later, we operate in Chile, Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia together with 34 engineers that are part of our team, and we still work without traditional management structures and work weeks, and have managed to grow our annual revenue by 204%.

Here’s how we do it.

No bosses

At big tech companies we frequently observed how programmers would do bad work in a short period of time and receive praise from their bosses. Over time, this leads to the standard: “let’s program with low quality but as fast as possible.”

As Google CEO Larry Page used to say: “Engineers shouldn’t be supervised by project managers with limited technical knowledge.”

On the other hand, as programmers, we used to find it profoundly annoying that our bosses would set meetings with us at any moment based on their needs. This may seem striking, but it’s essential.

A developer needs an average of four consecutive hours of uninterrupted work to be able to carry out a good quality job with significant advances. Consequently, the ideal day would be for a programmer to work in the morning from 9am to 1pm and in the afternoon from 2pm to 6pm, in order to reach maximum productivity.

If for example, our boss assigns a meeting at 11am, then the morning is lost since I have to get ready for the meeting, attend the meeting, greet everybody, discuss the topics, then I have to go back to my desk and pick up exactly from where I had left off, see what I was doing and keep on programming. With all these activities, the whole morning is practically lost.

As Paul Graham, entrepreneur, programmer and also founder of YCombinator used to say: “For a programmer, the cost of attending a meeting is always higher.”

No office

The truth is that when we started, having a workspace wasn’t an option. When we were taking our first steps we didn’t have the resources to rent an office.

The scenario stayed the same until the second year when we were finally able to move to an excellent office with the amenities that we had always dreamt of (like ping pong tables, video games, private and personal chef, gym equipment and huge TVs).

This stage only lasted eight months until we decided to go back to working remotely for a variety of reasons.

To start with, the time we waste by commuting to the office whether it is by public transportation or by driving our own cars is on average one hour to get there and one hour to get back home. That is to say, if we work nine hours a day, we are wasting an extra 22% of time just on commuting. We also have to add the cost of the rent and the cost of commuting to and from the office.

But the economic reason is not the most important one, nor the main reason for going back to working without an office; instead it was the physical and mental tiredness that commuting causes. That time could be used to achieve a much more important goal like spending time be with your family.

Lastly, we work today in five countries and we believe that the habit of working remotely will allow us to continue growing.

Four-day work week

Reducing the length of our work week is a relatively new aspect for our startup; we implemented it almost 2 years ago and until now it has been an excellent decision.

In the industrial era, there was a belief that the more you worked in the, the better the results were; that’s why we have to work 5 days a week and be with our families just 2 days.

In a technology project like ours, more doesn’t always mean better.

What we need is that engineers are satisfied with their jobs and motivated to do them well. We are not interested in the amount they produce; quality is what is essential.

This is strongly aligned with the goal of hiring the best programmers. Indicating that we just work four days a week is an exclusive differential: it allows us to hire only the best people and have a spectacular level of retention.

According to our own experience, an excellent programmer can do in half the time and with better quality what an average programmer does.

What’s more, we are tired of listening to and reading about the balance between work and family. For us, this is the best answer to this historical problem: you can now be with your family 50% more of time.

Step by step

  1. As a starting point, we eliminated meetings completely (one-on-one and group meetings). From that moment on, every internal communication is done through written text. There are no calls, physical meetings, nor teleconferences.

This may sound disruptive, but we have been doing it for internal communication for three years now and it’s something totally normal for us.

Indeed, after reading about how a manufacturing enterprise saved an equivalent to eliminating 200 job positions through reducing the duration of meetings to only 30 minutes and with a maximum of seven people per meeting, we realized we were on the right track.

  1. Furthermore, there is no more agenda; nobody can include a meeting in our work day or organize our schedule. The job is organized by each one of us based on our timetables and knowledge.

In this way, any type of communication, being exclusively through text, becomes an asynchronous communication. This means that we can program (code) fully focused for four consecutive hours without being interrupted and then, when we have the time, we can advance and answer.

  1. Another essential factor was that we eliminated email communication; we definitely got tired of using the email as a to-do list. The email wasn’t designed for this, let alone designed with enough efficiency to perform that role.

We changed from a work methodology that had historically worked through a “push” mechanism to one with a “pull” mechanism. This basically means that nobody can send me a job-related email to tell me what to do (push). I am the one now who selects my next tasks (pull).

Both the meetings and emails elimination is supported by a tool we developed internally and we called “iAutonomous”. It’s simply a SAAS (Software as a Service) app that allows each member of our startup to participate in and create a new project or task.

Like this, we will all see a list of activities in progress inside our enterprise and we can create and participate in those tasks that need our help in order to be successfully completed.

In this tool, we can see what each of the members is doing in real time. We don’t need a boss telling us what to do or if we did it correctly or incorrectly. We are all programmers and we know exactly how our peers work.

Be picky

I personally consider that there is just one main aspect that has been essential to us: the quality of the engineers we hire. The most important thing lies in their capacity of being proactive.

The people that work with us are entrepreneurs themselves—they don’t need someone evaluating whether they work or not.

What is even more problematic is that those engineers that are not proactive cause great damage to our working culture. High-performance engineers will only want to work with another one that works even more and that does things correctly (meaning, writes great code!).

We have made mistakes hiring programmers that didn’t have that profile. But in days—weeks at the latest—we have managed to detect this. I suggest you don’t hesitate to end work relationships that are not working out; it’s not good for neither of the parties. If they need to be supervised, they will surely find their place in any other company (with managers).

I recommend starting with these new habits from the first day. This will be much easier than changing them later.


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Via Günter Schumacher
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great article. Who want bosses? And a 4 day workweek makes the quality of your life so much better, especially when doing work as a programmer/coder.

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Is Work Killing You? In China, Workers Die at Their Desks

Is Work Killing You? In China, Workers Die at Their Desks | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
Chinese banking regulator Li Jianhua literally worked himself to death. After 26 years of “always putting the cause of the party and the people” first, his employer said this month, the 48-year-old official died rushing to finish a report before the sun came up.

China is facing an epidemic of overwork, to hear the state-controlled press and Chinese social media tell it. About 600,000 Chinese a year die from working too hard, according to the China Youth Daily. China Radio International in April reported a toll of 1,600 every day.

To read the full article, click on the title or image.




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Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Dedication to 'work' is very different in countries such as Korea, China,  Japan... However, a balance is necessary. Dead workers aren't helpful anymore for the company!

I have personally seen in the education system how some Asian kids are brought up in a very different culture, very demanding...

They get great results, but apparently, they pay a huge price.

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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, June 30, 2014 12:18 AM

About 600,000 Chinese a year die from working too hard, according to the China Youth Daily newspaper.

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23 fascinating diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world !

23 fascinating diagrams reveal how to negotiate with people around the world ! | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

You can't expect negotiations with the French to be like negotiations with Americans, and the same holds true for every culture around the world.

British linguist Richard D. Lewis charted communication patterns as well as leadership styles and cultural identities in his book, "When Cultures Collide," which is now in a third edition. His organization offers classes in cross-cultural communication for clients like Unilever and BMW.

Although cultural generalizations can be overly reductive, Lewis, who speaks 10 languages, insists it can be done fairly. "Determining national characteristics is treading a minefield of inaccurate assessment and surprising exception. There is, however, such a thing as a national norm," he writes.

Scroll down to see Lewis' insights on negotiating with people around the world.



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Via Fouad Bendris
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Interesting differences between cultures and good to know beforehand. Missing is the Arabic culture, which takes lots of time before getting down to business talk. Building a relationship is important there, getting to know each other.

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Fouad Bendris's curator insight, August 18, 2015 3:43 PM

Key insights for international business ... 

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You Should Run Your Startup Like a Cult. Here's How - Wired

You Should Run Your Startup Like a Cult. Here's How - Wired | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

No company has a culture; every company is a culture. A startup is a team of people on a mission, and a good culture is just what that looks like on the inside. The first team that I built has become known in Silicon Valley as the “PayPal Mafia” because so many of my former colleagues, including Elon Musk, Reid Hoffman, and David Sacks, have gone on to help each other start and invest in successful tech companies.


We didn’t assemble a mafia by sorting through résumés and simply hiring the most talented people. I had seen the mixed results of that approach when I worked at a New York law firm. The relationships between lawyers I worked with were oddly thin. They spent all day together, but few of them seemed to have much to say to each other outside the office.

Why work with a group of people who don’t even like each other? Taking a merely professional view of the workplace, in which free agents check in and out on a transactional basis, is worse than cold: It’s not even rational. Since time is your most valuable asset, it’s odd to spend it working with people who don’t envision any long‑term future together.


Rule 1: The Best Startups Work a Lot Like Cults

In the most intense kind of organization, members abandon the outside world and hang out only with other members. We have a word for such organizations: cults. Cultures of total dedication look crazy from the outside. But entrepreneurs should take cultures of extreme dedication seriously.

The extreme opposite of a cult is a consulting firm like Accenture: not only does it lack a distinctive mission, but individual consultants are regularly dropping in and out of companies to which they have no long‑term connection whatsoever.

Every company culture can be plotted on a linear spectrum:

The best startups might be considered slightly less extreme kinds of cults. The biggest difference is that cults tend to be fanatically wrong about something important. People at a successful startup are fanatically right about something those outside it have missed.


Rule 2: Giving People a Chance to “Change the World” Is a Lousy Way to Recruit Employees

Recruiting is a core competency for any company. It should never be outsourced. Talented people don’t need to work for you; they have plenty of options. You should ask yourself: Why would someone join your company as its 20th engineer when she could go work at Google for more money and more prestige?

Here are some bad answers: “Your stock options will be worth more here than elsewhere.” “You’ll get to work with the smartest people in the world.” “You can help solve the world’s most challenging problems.” Every company makes these same claims, so they won’t help you stand out.

You’ll attract the employees you need if you can explain why your mission is compelling: not why it’s important in general, but why you’re doing something important that no one else is going to get done. However, even a great mission is not enough. The best recruit will also wonder: “Are these the kind of people I want to work with?” You should be able to explain why your company is a unique match for him personally. And if you can’t do that, he’s probably not the right match.


Rule 3: Everyone at Your Startup Should Have Just One Job

Internal peace is what enables a startup to survive at all. But most fights inside a company happen when colleagues compete for the same responsibilities. Startups face an especially high risk of this since job roles are fluid at the early stages.

The best thing I did as a manager at PayPal was to make every person in the company responsible for doing just one thing. I had started doing this just to simplify the task of managing people. But then I noticed a deeper result: Defining roles reduced conflict. Eliminating competition makes it easier for everyone to build the kinds of long‑term relationships that transcend mere professionalism.


Rule 4: Hire Employees Who Are Excited to Wear Your Logo on Their Hoodies

Startups have limited resources and small teams. They must work quickly and efficiently in order to survive, and that’s easier to do when everyone shares an understanding of the world.

It’s a cliché that tech workers don’t care about what they wear, but if you look closely at the T‑shirts people in Mountain View and Palo Alto wear to work, you’ll see the logos of their companies—and tech workers care about those very much. The startup uniform encapsulates a simple but essential principle: Everyone at your company should be different in the same way—a tribe of like‑minded people fiercely devoted to the company’s mission.

Above all, don’t fight the perk war. Anybody who would be powerfully swayed by free laundry pickup or pet day care would be a bad addition to your team. Just cover the basics and then promise what no others can: the opportunity to do irreplaceable work on a unique problem alongside great people.

Excerpted with permission from ZERO TO ONE: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future by Peter Thiel with Blake Masters. Copyright 2014 by Peter Thiel. Published by Crown Business, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company.


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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Another great article from Peter Thiel. How do you run your startup. Does everyone believe in what you're doing, or is it just a job?

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The Truth About What It’s Like Working For Uber | LinkedIn

The Truth About What It’s Like Working For Uber | LinkedIn | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

I was a Community Manager on the East Coast for Uber for almost a year (February 2013 – December 2013). After being ‘out’ for about nine months, I’ve had a chance to reflect on my time there. I’ve also been encouraged to, due to the number of people who’ve reached out to me, asking how it was, since they themselves are considering applying.

This makes sense. It’s smart to talk to someone who works at a company before deciding to work there. It’s even smarter to talk to someone who currently works there and someone who used to.

So let me tell you what it’s really like working for Uber:

PROS1. The Team Is Extraordinary

The people at Uber are freaking awesome (apparently, the real f-word caused some people to stop reading). There’s no other way to put it. They’re astonishingly smart, motivated, talented, warm, friendly, and very hardworking. Uber is extraordinarily picky about who they hire, and they do a good job of bringing in brilliant people.

For me, my peers were the best part of the job. They not only had my back most of the time, but they were super fun. For the most part (not all the time, but the vast majority of the time), I felt like I could reach out to anyone there, and they’d make time for me.

As a rule, people at Uber are generous and bighearted and intelligent and sharp and creative and cool.

2. They’re Fair

For the most part, Uber is a pretty flat meritocracy. They’re ready to listen to anyone, if what they say is of value. Good ideas are noticed, respected, and implemented. There are obviously some politics (I don’t believe any large organization of human beings can totally avoid that), but it’s not the predominant company culture.

Instead, they’re extremely focused on metrics and analytics. Your success is largely based on your performance in terms of numbers, not whether someone likes you or you’re someone’s cousin or you’ve been there longer.

3. It’s A Crazy Awesome Ride (pun unintended)

There’s nothing like being on the inside of an insanely popular and insanely high-growth tech startup. Uber’s growth is unbelievable. I’ve never seen anything like it. The weekly all-team meetings, held via Skype since Uber is now in 100+ cities all over the world, are awe-inspiring. It’s unreal watching baby cities grow into monster cities, or small teams blossom into huge ones. Working for Uber is like being on the inside of a real live game of SimCity.

It’s an incredible feeling to know that you’re part of it.

4. People’s Reactions To, “So, what do you do?” Are Awesome

It usually goes down like this:

Rando #1: “So, what do you do?”
You: “I work for Uber.”
Rando #1: “What!??! That’s so cool!”
Rando #2:I love Uber!”
Rando #3: *just looks at you in awe*

CONSIt’s Stressful

Really, really stressful.

I did an informal poll while I was at Uber, asking people in different departments and different cities: “On a scale of 1-10, how stressed were you at your last position, and how stressed are you at Uber?” I routinely got answers of 2-6 pre-Uber, and 8-10 at Uber. One guy said, “At my last job, maybe like a 4. At Uber? Normally ... 8. This week? 11.”

At Stanford, we had a saying that students there are like ducks on a pond. On the surface, they look like they’re effortlessly floating along; under the surface, they’re paddling like mofos, their hearts going a million miles a minute just to keep up.

That’s Uber. Everyone looks like they’re doing fine, but they’re really working 80-100 weeks and even then, constantly feel like they’re behind. Working for Uber is a sprint, with marathon hours.

It’s Disjointed

Uber is still in the awkward gangly phase of a burgeoning startup. The thing is, it’s not really a startup anymore. It’s a big company with things like corporate values and policies and rules and guidelines. So expectations of employees are really high, but without all the support that comes with that.

As a CM (Community Manager), it was hard sometimes to rally all the things I needed help with, without pissing people off. I was dependent on teammates in design or engineering who were all the way across the country, many of whom I’d never met in person. It was nerve-wracking to not be in control, especially when I had time-sensitive needs and there was limited communication. I often felt powerless, but when I pointed this out I felt like I was just looked at as a complainer. A similar problem was echoed by others around me, those who experienced parts of Uber as rigid, not always willing to make the right systemic changes due to wanting to go at a breakneck pace all the time.

At Uber, you’re not always going to be given everything you need, to do the job you’re expected to do. The right systems simply aren’t in place yet; it’s all still being built. Things can be stressful or difficult, but without the recognition that they are, which can be challenging to deal with. It’s easy to feel alone, even while you’re surrounded by amazing people.

There Is No Work/Life Balance

At Uber, you work nights, weekends, and holidays. Some teams split it up so you get some real time off during the week/weekend, but that’s rare (FYI, some of this may have changed, since things at Uber shift so rapidly, but I doubt it. It’s ingrained in the culture). What’s not rare is to sign on to Hipchat (the way the entire company stays in touch) at 11pm on a Saturday night, and see lots of colleagues online, working, as well. Fortunately, you can work from home, and most teams are pretty flexible about that, but it’s still important to understand that you will be working *all* the time.

Uber does a good job about being upfront about this; they describe it to potential new hires as “the Uber lifestyle.” You’re expected to pitch in and do whatever it takes to have your city succeed, no matter when or how long it takes, and everyone hired is willing to do so.

Joining Uber is like joining the Firm from that John Grisham book … The Firm. Once you’re in, you’re in. Think of it like getting into the military, only cooler and you probably won’t die.

-------------------------

So, would I recommend working for Uber?

It depends on who you are and what you want.

If you’re young and hungry with few attachments, it’s a great option. For someone single, just out of college who just moved to the area, not wanting to get into a relationship or hang out with a lot of people outside the company, it’s practically ideal (practically). You’ll meet incredible people and be part of a strong culture. You’ll constantly be working, but you’ll never be bored and you won’t mind as much because most if not all of your friends will be at the company.

However, if you’re already somewhat established in your life (mid- to late 20s, early 30s, or in a relationship), it’s going to be hard. It will be ‘normal’ to spend your entire workweek working until 9pm or 10pm every day, then work an all-day event on Saturday, for Uber. You’ll miss seeing your friends and family, and resent the constant feeling that you’re not doing enough, despite working so much. This may wear on you over time, and eventually you may burn out.

As for me, my story has a happy ending (not that kind, but it’s still good). I’m happier at my current job than I ever was at Uber. We’re OpiaTalk, a tech startup in the eCommerce space, out of Baltimore. We help retailers make the most of their organic traffic – our social commerce widget turns browsers into buyers, hyper-converting traffic and driving opted-in leads at 4-5x industry average. Our team rocks, and I’m proud to be our Director of Communications. (That's us on the left -- I'm the crazy-looking one in the brown dress!).

Now, I wake up excited about my job and I also have real weekends, which has me feeling rested and ready for the week. During my time off I feel like I’m truly off, which is pretty much the best freaking feeling ever. At Uber, I constantly fantasized about leaving; it was never sustainable. OpiaTalk is sustainable because I work hard, and I have a life outside it.

Finally, I really wasn’t in the right role at Uber, and my manager wasn’t willing to work out a way to put me in one better suited to me in a timeline that worked. At my current job, I play to my strengths, and I feel truly supported by my boss. Shoutout to you, Tom Popomaronis: I love you, your mentorship, your humor, your entrepreneurial fire, your drive, and your heart. It’s why I’ll stick with you through anything, and why I’m pumped to be on the team you’ve built, that we continue to build together. Thanks for including me and for believing in me.

-------------------------

thought long and hard about whether to publish this. My hope is that it came across the way it was intended: as an honest and thoughtful distillation of my own experiences and observations of what I still see as one of the coolest modern companies to come out of the United States.

You want to talk about disruption? Uber has actually disrupted the tech/transportation industry. The world is literally different because of this company, and I say that as a young woman who is guaranteed a safe ride home in most cities where she goes. #Gamechanger. I also respect how Uber helps empower an entire generation of drivers with safe, flexible jobs – an opinion based primarily off my own one-on-one discussions with countless drivers about what Uber allows for them and their families.

I'm grateful to have had the opportunity to work for Uber for a variety of reasons, including gaining a better understanding of where I truly belong and how I want my work life to feel. That was an invaluable lesson, even if was a painful process. Sometimes, yes, it’s important to stick with a position for your own professional growth; other times sticking with it just leads to suffering. Here's the truth: Some jobs fit your personality, and some don’t. Some company cultures fit you; some don’t.

I can’t tell anyone what to do; I can only offer up my perspective. I hope it was Uber helpful. ;)

--------

Melanie is Director of Communications for OpiaTalk, the social shopping widget for retailers. OpiaTalk releases a time-sensitive promo on your site once a certain amount of visitors click, and also drives opted-in leads. Our latest client is seeing 19% conversions (nope, not a typo!). We call ourselves the hyper-conversion widget; check us out at www.opiatalk.com or contact hello@opiatalk.com.

And if you identify as a Millennial, I've got a quick 4-minute survey I'd love for you to take. If you do it, I'll be as happy as a teenage boy watching Anaconda.

Melanie welcomes connection of all types, including the LinkedIn variety: melanie@opiatalk.com.



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Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Want to work for a startup? Take a look at this very honest article. I love it, it puts everything in perspective. And yes, not all startups are alike.

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THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, September 2, 2014 2:25 PM

An ex-employee on what it's really like to work for Uber: