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Comparative Government and Politics
News, information, and instruction resources for AP Comparative Government and Politics
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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

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The BRIC Countries

The BRIC Countries | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
For some time now, Brazil, Russia, India, and China have been grouped together under the acronym BRIC.

 

What are the demographic profiles of these "BRIC" countries that are increasingly looming large in the global consciousness?  While they to not quite fit the profile of more developed countries (MDCs), the BRIC countries are notable for how rapidly they are closing the gap in many metrics. 


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 9:21 PM

The BRIC countries are among the top 10 riches countries in the world and this article shows data supporting the idea that by 2050, These countries will pass the top 4 countries due to their booming economies. As the countries continue their upward climb they will be closer to securing their place atop of the richest countries list.