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Comparative Government and Politics
News, information, and instruction resources for AP Comparative Government and Politics
Curated by Matt Beiriger
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Role of Welsh MPs could be limited

Role of Welsh MPs could be limited | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
Welsh, Scottish and Northern Irish MPs could see their roles limited if proposals to give English MPs more say on laws for England are brought in.
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The sound of silence

The sound of silence | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
IT IS sometimes claimed that the devil has all the best tunes. It is not true; America does.
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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

A quick explanation of the terms United Kingdom, Great Britain, England and much much more. See the poster version: http://blog.cgpgrey.com/the-united-kingdo...
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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:44 AM

The parliament in London is shifting more power to Scotland and other areas in what is called devolution.  This reflects a push for more independence of countries in the UK that are not England. In order to keep the UK together concessions must be made, this devolution is the British Parliament's efforts to keep the UK intact.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 9:30 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This picture explains how devolution works and provides a specific example with the breaking down of power of the imperialist England and it's control into an equally represented United Kingdom. This is an example of devolution at it's best.

This picture relates to unit 4 because it shows how devolution, which is a major part of unit 4, works. It explains it's parts and gives specific geographic examples as in the U.K. this overall relates to unit 4.

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 22, 4:04 PM

Devolution is the transfer of powers from a central government to more regional power, in this case, the UK. The UK devolved its powers to England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. These countries have had independent parliaments since 1997. Some "reserved powers" have not been devolved from the UK such as foreign affairs, military defense, international and  economic policies. This change of power has stirred questions on public spending and tax policies, and is still a debate and event to keep your eye on.

 

I feel that devolution has many benefits that outweigh the negative consequences such as money spending. Countries can function in a more independent manner and govern themselves within their defined boundaries in a more efficient way. This topic and article gives greater insight to our political unit and provides great insight for each country's respective parliament.

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Court TV plan 'in Queen's speech'

Court TV plan 'in Queen's speech' | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
New legislation to allow television cameras into courts in England and Wales are to be announced in the Queen's Speech in May, according to reports.
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