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Comparative Government and Politics
News, information, and instruction resources for AP Comparative Government and Politics
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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

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The BRIC Countries

The BRIC Countries | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
For some time now, Brazil, Russia, India, and China have been grouped together under the acronym BRIC.

 

What are the demographic profiles of these "BRIC" countries that are increasingly looming large in the global consciousness?  While they to not quite fit the profile of more developed countries (MDCs), the BRIC countries are notable for how rapidly they are closing the gap in many metrics. 


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HK 'to stop' China birth tourism

HK 'to stop' China birth tourism | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
Hong Kong hospitals will stop maternity services to women from mainland China under proposals compiled by upcoming Chief Executive CY Leung.
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Four Russias: rethinking the post-Soviet map | openDemocracy

Four Russias: rethinking the post-Soviet map | openDemocracy | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it

Russia has traditionally been conceptualised as a single entity, albeit divided into many regions, but is this approach appropriate given the country's stratified population? Natalia Zubarevich argues that for a better understanding of Russia and where it is going we need to think not geographically, but arithmetically.


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Russia's Demography: Reversal Of The "Russian Cross"

Russia's Demography: Reversal Of The "Russian Cross" | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it

Last year our country’s population increased, for the first time in 20 years. Although positive growth in aggregate was only enabled by immigration from the Near Abroad, existing trends in rising fertility and falling mortality were maintained.


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In China, some find ways to beat one-child policy - CNN.com

In China, some find ways to beat one-child policy - CNN.com | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
Something isn't quite right with this picture. There seem to be too many children here. Isn't this the country famed for its one-child policy? Aren't their big fines and penalties for having that second child?
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Collapse as Crucible: The Reforging of Russian Society

Collapse as Crucible: The Reforging of Russian Society | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it

What follows is a preliminary attempt to map the changing shape of Russian society in the last two decades, the better to understand its present condition, and its likely future trajectories. One of the fundamental enigmas this essay will seek to explain is why a society that has suffered so dramatic a series of reversals has nonetheless remained relatively stable.


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In Nigeria, a Preview of an Overcrowded Planet

In Nigeria, a Preview of an Overcrowded Planet | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
Much of the Earth’s population growth is in sub-Saharan African nations like Nigeria, where trends that have lowered birthrates elsewhere have not yet caught on.
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In Russia, a lack of men forces women to settle for less

In Russia, a lack of men forces women to settle for less | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
When Russia and China vote together on UN Resolutions (such as their recent veto of the UN Resolution on Syria), I always think to myself that in the two countries’ collective unconscious they realize that they are going to have...

 

Demographic facts: 1) China has more men than women. 2) Russian has more women than men. While these two facts are rather straightforward, their impact on society, gender roles, politics, economics and culture are quite complicated. This article chronicles how this 'shortage' of men in Russia has led to an imbalance of power in heterosexual relationships, altering cultural gender norms.


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:57 AM

This could be a reason that Russia has been pushing an anti-Homosexual agenda.  It certainly is not right, and has been enforced too extremely, but perhaps they feel that there are not enough heterosexual relationships  due to the uneven ratio of men and women, and that an increase in the amount of homosexual couples will add to the issue.  

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:54 PM

This article is digusting and shocking.  The feminist in me flew at my screen when I read that domestic violence is "not only rampant...but accepted."  I feel indescribable pity for women who live in a country where they are required to live under the rule of a man, even when there are not enough to go around, so they are forced to settle for brutes who know how much power they wield over the women.  If it were acceptable for a woman to live as a single, independent individual, things would be much different but these girls who are held to lesser standards by their own culture have to suffer domestic violence and infidelity due to a shortage of men. 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 10:02 PM

When hearing of Russia's imbalance of men vs. women I did not think further into how much this fact could affect not only hetero relationships, but the relationships amongst the sexes themselves as well.  Morality is altered in this society where men are so scarce and are "shared" by the women.  It is known that Putin, a married man is married and has had a long term affair, and child with another  women.  The article states "no one really cares."  With our fair share of presidential affairs both in the far past and fairly recent, we see how unacceptable society finds such behavior.  But would the game change if all of sudden men were so scarce?  It is also disheartening that the female population is not united due to the lack of men.  

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Economists assert that above all else, political institutions determine the wealth of nations

Economists assert that above all else, political institutions determine the wealth of nations | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
It is among the grandest topics in scholarship: Why do some nations, such as the United States, become wealthy and powerful, while others remain stuck in poverty?
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Russia’s Mortality From Vices On The Decline

Russia’s Mortality From Vices On The Decline | Comparative Government and Politics | Scoop.it
Sometimes a single picture is worth a thousand words. This is one. Though Russia remains a highly dangerous country by developed country standards, it has improved immeasurably in the past decade.

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