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Amazing People

Amazing People | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

Former first lady Jackie Kennedy and Coretta Scott King at Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1968 funeral.

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Black Prophetic Fire: Cornel West on the Revolutionary Legacy of Leading African-American Voices [VIDEO]

Black Prophetic Fire: Cornel West on the Revolutionary Legacy of Leading African-American Voices [VIDEO] | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


"The renowned scholar, author and activist Dr. Cornel West, joins us to discuss his latest book, "Black Prophetic Fire." West engages in conversation with the German scholar and thinker Christa Buschendorf about six revolutionary African-American leaders: Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Ella Baker, Malcolm X and Ida B. Wells. Even as the United States is led by its first black president, West says he is fearful that we may be "witnessing the death of black prophetic fire in our time."


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Forty-Two Years Ago: The Worst Mass Murder Of Gay People In US History

Forty-Two Years Ago: The Worst Mass Murder Of Gay People In US History | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

32 Killed in Arson Fire At New Orleans Gay Bar: 1973.

The UpStairs Lounge fire was the deadliest in New Orleans’ history, and may very well have been the worst mass murder of gay people in American history. But aside from the first day’s coverage, New Orleans could barely muster a yawn. Newspaper photos of Rev. Larson’s charred body against the window frame came to symbolize the city’s apathy t0ward the tragedy. Talk radio hosts told jokes (“What will they bury the ashes of queers in? Fruit jars.”), and a cab driver callously quipped, “I hope the fire burned their dresses off.” Not only did the New Orleans Police Department barely investigate the crime, they could hardly be bothered to identify the victims. Major Henry Morris, chief detective of the New Orleans Police Department said, “We don’t even know these papers belonged to the people we found them on. Some thieves hung out there, and you know this was a queer bar.” Churches refused to allow families to hold funerals on their premises. Other families refused to claim their dead sons’ bodies. Four unidentified bodies ended up being dumped in a mass grave. Although there was a firm suspect in the case, no one was ever charged.


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Qian Xuesen

Qian Xuesen | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Qián Xuésēn (1911-2009), also known as Tsien Hsue-shen or H.S. Tsien or 钱学森, was a top rocket scientist in the US in the 1940s and then, after the US deported him in 1955, a top rocket scientist in China. He helped to found the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in the US and China’s aerospace industry.


That decision to deport him has affected the balance of power between China and the US ever since.


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The Watsonville Riot

The Watsonville Riot | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


The Watsonville Riot
 (1930) was an anti-Filipino riot in Watsonville, California. The violence lasted five days and led to violence in nearby Stockton, Salinas, Gilroy and San Francisco. There were protests in the Philippines. The body of Fermin Tobera, who was killed during the riot, was sent back to the Philippines for his funeral, where he became a martyr. The Philippines was then under US rule.


By 1909
 California grew half the fruits and vegetables in the US. With refrigerated railway cars crossing the nation, California growers stood to make a ton of money.


California news editors and politicians
, on the other hand, found they could sell newspapers or win votes by fanning the flames of White hatred against Asians, hatred that often turned violent. They were so successful that by1882 Congress had all but shut off immigration from China and, in 1917, from the rest of Asia – with one exception: the Philippines.


The US had taken over the Philippines in the Philippine American War (1899-1902). Congress was too racist to make the Philippines into states or its people into citizens, but Filipinos did become US nationals. While they could not vote or serve on juries, they could live and work anywhere in the US and its territories.


So by the 1920s, Filipinos had become the cheapest farm workers in California
. Growers used them as strikebreakers. White people (aka voters) were being thrown out of work. Then in 1929 the stock market crashed in New York and the country sank into the Great Depression.


It gets worse: Most Filipinos in California were young, single men. That put them in direct competition with White men for White women. California had outlawed marriage between Whites and “negros”, “mulattos”, or “Mongolians”, but it was not clear to everyone whether Filipinos counted as “Mongolians”. Some said they were “Malay” instead.


...


In 1933, California outlawed marriage between Whites and Malays.


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Life-size replica showing the amount of space enslaved people had on the Middle Passage.

Life-size replica showing the amount of space enslaved people had on the Middle Passage. | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

By Andrew Pegoda 


I wanted to share part of Tim’s project, and lucky for you (!), he gave permission to do so. (Make sure to check out the blog he created for the class!) In the pictures below, you’ll see his replica of approximately how much space enslaved Blacks had on the Middle Passage. On ships using the “tight packing” method, each person had somewhere around 6′ by 16″ by 30″. Tim’s replica would be the amount of space for two or three people. 


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Arlis Groves's curator insight, May 19, 7:06 PM

Space for Africans on slavers varied, but descriptions always horrify us.  See the observations from PBS.org:  


The slaves were branded with hot irons and restrained with shackles. Their "living quarters" was often a deck within the ship that had less than five feet of headroom -- and throughout a large portion of the deck, sleeping shelves cut this limited amount of headroom in half.4 Lack of standing headroom was the least of the slaves' problems, though. With 300 to 400 people packed in a tiny area5 -- an area with little ventilation and, in some cases, not even enough space to place buckets for human waste -- disease was prevalent. According to Equiano, "The closeness of the place, and the heat of the climate, added to the number in the ship, which was so crowded that each had scarcely room to turn himself, almost suffocated us. This produced copious perspirations, so that the air soon became unfit for respiration, from a variety of loathsome smells, and brought on a sickness among the slaves, of which many died."

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Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

Temujin (c. 1162-1227), better known by his title, Genghis Khan (or Chinggis Khan, among scholars), founded the Mongol Empire, one of he largest ever by land. Only the British Empire was larger, and not by much. It was also one of the bloodiest, killing 30 to 40 million people by some estimates. So many that it led to a marked drop in carbon dioxide levels.


He is a huge hero in his native Mongolia, honoured in China but is seen as a barbarian destroyer pretty much everywhere else, especially in Russia.


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Did You Know: Philadelphia Bombed A Black Community [VIDEO]

Did You Know:  Philadelphia Bombed A Black Community [VIDEO] | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


There have been many unthinkable travesties inflicted on Black people in this place the slaves called “merica”. We know about the lynchings, rapes, and thefts that were all too common and protected by law. In fact, because these horrors were done under cover of law they were useful tools to suppress the people of the stolen tribes of Africa. Not many people are aware of just how extreme and the lengths these people went to use some of these extreme forms of brutality. For example, what happened in Tulsa Oklahoma in 1921 where the government bombed and destroyed an entire black community.


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Duke University Debuts Website Documenting SNCC & the Voting Rights Struggle

Duke University Debuts Website Documenting SNCC & the Voting Rights Struggle | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has just debuted a new website documenting the struggle of theStudent Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to secure voting rights for African Americans. The site, entitled“One Person, One Vote: The Legacy of the SNCC and the Fight for Voting Rights,” went live one week before the 50th anniversary of the “Bloody Sunday” voting rights march in Selma, Alabama on March 7, 1965.


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The ATTICA Prison Rebellion and the State-Sponsored Massacre That Followed [VIDEO]

The ATTICA Prison Rebellion and the State-Sponsored Massacre That Followed [VIDEO] | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


By Caleb Gee


The preamble to the Attica Liberation Manifesto of Demands put the world on alert to the deplorable conditions prisoners are subjected to in the so-called "Land of the free".


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Black History: Brown v Board of Education

Black History: Brown v Board of Education | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

...
 

"This case changed the face of America in away, unlike any other decision. The Brown case, as it is known, was not the first such case regarding civil rights argued before the court it is worth mentioning. It was just the most significant of what some would say was the final battle in the courts that had been fought by African American parents since 1849, which started with Roberts v. City of Boston in Massachusetts. It is also important to note that Kansas was the site of eleven such cases spanning from 1881 to 1949.


The case was named after Oliver Brown one of 200 plaintiffs. The Brown case was initiated and organized by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) leadership who recruited African American parents in Topeka, Kansas for a class action suit against the local school board. The Supreme Court combined five cases under the heading of Brown v. Board of Education: Delaware, Kansas, South Carolina, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. The ultimate goal sought by the NAACP was to end the practice of “separate but equal” throughout every segment of society, including public transportation, dining facilities, public schools and all forms of public accommodations.


The Brown Supreme Court ruling determined racial segregation in public education was unconstitutional in Brown I, the first opinion. The court’s implementation mandate of “with all deliberate speed” in 1955 is known as Brown II. In 1979, twenty-five years later, there was a Brown III because Topeka was not living up to the earlier Supreme Court ruling, which resulted in Topeka Public Schools building three magnet schools to comply with the court’s findings. As had been the case since Homer Plessy, the subject in Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 when the U.S. Supreme Court decided that a Louisiana law mandating separate but equal accommodations for blacks and whites on intrastate railroads was constitutional. This decision provided the legal foundation to justify many other actions by state and local governments to socially separate blacks and whites."


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Community Village Sites's insight:

This is an interesting topic. 


On the one hand, students may fair better with peers of a feather and teachers of a feather. I’ve read reports about children of color being discriminated against by TEACHERS within majority white schools. 


However, we should have the freedom to go to any school we like, but due to the existence of private schools many cannot afford to go the them which creates class segregation. Is a good option to ban all private schools? Even though that is limiting freedom – I think that might be better for society as a whole. 


There’s a book that describes how de-segregation never really took root. It’s called Dismantling Desegregation: The Quiet Reversal of Brown V. Board of Education 


This topic ties in with housing segregation because children are only allowed to go to public schools within their local school district – at least in the Bay Area, California. 


I’ve been asking myself also about segregated communities. 


We fought for de-segregation, then we got the by-product. Gentrification. 


My questions: 
Can we have de-segregation without having gentrification? 
What is worse, de-facto segregation or gentrification? 


My guess is that most people want freedom to move anywhere ALONG with respect for ALL people in both communities. 


I think the main complaint with gentrification is that when new money moves in, disrespect and intolerance often moves in with it. Hence the never ending need for racial justice studies and racial justice campaigns. 


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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 26, 5:07 AM

Neither is no education at ALL!   

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Racism before 1400

Racism before 1400 | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

By Abagond


Racism before 1400 was not common to most human societies. It is not mainly rooted in the human condition.


The common mix-up
is between ethnocentrism and racism:

  • racism – dividing humans into “races” based on physical appearance, like skin colour, with the aim of ranking them from highest to lowest according to supposedly unchangeable, inborn qualities, like intelligence, civilization, moral character or beauty.
  • ethnocentrism – judging other cultures based on one’s own. This leads to the illusion that one’s own culture is best. From this comes stuff like “American exceptionalism”, non-Greeks as “barbarians”, China as the “Middle Kingdom” and Inuits as “the Real People”.


Ethnocentrism is common if not universal in human history. Racism is not.


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Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968

Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968 | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


While most people know that students were killed at Kent State in 1970, very few know about the murder of students at Jackson State and even less about South Carolina State College in Orangeburg. In Orangeburg, two years before the Kent State murders, 28 students were injured and three were killed — most shot in the back by the state police while involved in a peaceful protest. One of the by-standers, Cleveland Sellers, was arrested for inciting a riot and sentenced to a year of in prison. Now president of Voorhees College, he was the only person to do time. Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968 is an excellent documentary which brings to light this untold story of the Civil Rights Movement including candid interviews with many of those involved in the event: students, journalists, officers on the scene, and the then-Governor. The film also provides students with a good understanding of the concept of Black Power in the context of the Civil Rights Movement.


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Rob Duke's curator insight, February 12, 11:26 PM

Never again....

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Black History Month - Trayvon Martin

Black History Month - Trayvon Martin | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Trayvon Benjamin Martin (February 5, 1995 – February 26, 2012) was a 17-year-old Black teen from Miami Gardens, Florida. His life became famous in his death that brought many issues to public interest, including neighborhood watch, stand your ground law, racial profiling, and police investigations. Trayvon’s death brought attention to the justice system and cultural diversity.


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Community Village Sites's insight:


Thank you Xena for this beautiful biography of Trayvon!

May he rest in peace and his family find resolution and comfort somehow. 
 

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Secret World War II Chemical Experiments Tested Troops By Race

Secret World War II Chemical Experiments Tested Troops By Race | Community Village World History | Scoop.it
While the Pentagon acknowledged years ago that it used American servicemen in World War II mustard gas experiments, NPR found new details about tests that grouped subjects by the color of their skin.
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The Black Millennial Historian (In-Training) | blackourstory: Happy Black History YEAR!

The Black Millennial Historian (In-Training) | blackourstory: Happy Black History YEAR! | Community Village World History | Scoop.it
blackourstory:
“Happy Black History YEAR!
Community Village Sites's insight:

This letter came out of Baltimore in 1969. 


The Black Panther Party is not a hate group. 


When Black people got together to create a Free Breakfast Program, the FBI wanted to put a stop to it. That is hate. 


The KKK is a real hate group, and yet the FBI never went in and assonated their members. #DoubleStandards #RacialBias 


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Mao

Mao | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

Máo Zédōng (1893-1976), also known as Mao Tse-tung or 毛澤東, was a guerrilla leader married to a film star. By 1949 he ruled a fifth of mankind: China. As a young soldier he helped to overthrow the last emperor of China in 1911. In middle age, he led the Chinese communist revolution to victory in 1949. He ruled China from 1949 to 1976.


One of the most printed books of the 1900s
was his “Quotations from Chairman Mao Tsetung” (1966), better known as the Little Red Book. It had stuff like this:

“People of the world, unite and defeat the U.S. aggressors and all their running dogs! People of the world, be courageous, dare to fight, defy difficulties and advance wave upon wave. Then the whole world will belong to the people. Monsters of all kinds shall be destroyed.”

Mao freed China from imperialism, both Japanese and Western. That made him a hero to many, inside and outside of China. He united China and made it a world power.


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#MalcolmXDay: 20 Quotes Relevant To The Movement Today

#MalcolmXDay: 20 Quotes Relevant To The Movement Today | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

Source: Michael Ochs Archives / Getty


Malcolm X
remains one of the most important figures of the American Civil Rights Movement, and his transformation into a vocal human rights activist added to his already impressive legacy.


The man later known as el-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz came to relax some of his fiery politics that defined the earlier part of his time in the spotlight, and yet that same passion remained even as he began to embrace a comprehensive approach to racial harmony.


With the current situations across the nation regarding disparity in how police treat people of color and similar injustices, Malcolm X’s words still hold resonance in modern times. From Ferguson to
Baltimore, African-Americans are reminded that incidents in those respective cities are part of a systematic condition that renders Black people targets of various forms of mistreatment.


On what would be his 90th birthday, NewsOne takes a look…


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The MOVE bombing

The MOVE bombing | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


The MOVE bombing
(May 13th 1985) was where Philadelphia police in the US bombed the house of MOVE, a Black back-to-nature movement. Eleven people were killed. Five were children, ages 5 to 13. The police called the children “combatants”. The fire department stood right there and did nothing for an hour as the fire spread, destroying 61 houses in the mostly Black, West Philly neighbourhood.

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Historians chronicle lives, dreams of Mexican braceros in U.S. labor program

Historians chronicle lives, dreams of Mexican braceros in U.S. labor program | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

By Tanya Carbajal
Borderzine


EL PASO — Emilio Solis Pallares,92, sits at his home in Fabens, Texas, listening with surprised amusement to his own voice for the first time 12 years after his story was cataloged along with the tales of hundreds of other bracero farmworkers as part of a national program by the Smithsonian Institution.


Yes, that is me and the story still remains true,” said Solis, who labored in the cotton of fields of Tornillo, Texas, for 15 years in the 1940’s and 1950’s as a member of the federal Bracero program, which recruited 4.6 million Mexican citizens to work in agriculture in the United States.


Solis’ story was just one of more than 900 interviews conducted by the Institute of Oral History at the University of Texas at El Paso. More than 3,000 oral histories of braceros can be listened to online at the Bracero History Archive. Emilio’s oral history can be found here.


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Jane Addams

Jane Addams | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Jane Addams (1860-1935) was one of the leading White liberal reformers in the US. She founded Hull House in 1889 in the Near West Side of Chicago, then an immigrant slum. It was a settlement house that became the model throughout the US. She also helped to found the NAACP. She opposed the US entering the First World War. That got her kicked out of the Daughters of the American Revolution – but led her to winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931.


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Community Village Sites's insight:


Well, I knew more about the Addams Family than about Jane Addams. 


Our schools could do a better job of sharing the accomplishments of women in history. 


People begging for White history month. Abagond did it on his blog. 
 

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X: Malcolm's Final Years [VIDEO]

X: Malcolm's Final Years [VIDEO] | Community Village World History | Scoop.it
Commemorating the 50th anniversary of his death, teleSUR re-examines the life and legacy of Malcolm X. Interviews include Angela Davis and Danny Glover. (Executive Producer Paul Jay)
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Gloria Richardson 1963

Gloria Richardson 1963 | Community Village World History | Scoop.it
Gloria Richardson pushes a National Guardsman’s bayonet aside during a 1963 protest. pic.twitter.com/JEOrMYoOiP
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(VIDEO) Malcolm X, “The Police Attack You then Charge You with Assault”

(VIDEO) Malcolm X, “The Police Attack You then Charge You with Assault” | Community Village World History | Scoop.it
50 years after the death of Malcolm X and his prophetic words ring just as true today as they did in 1965.
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Rob Duke's curator insight, February 22, 12:02 AM

I wasn't with him, but I've not seen cops go out of their way to find trouble.  Folks are usually up to trouble; or, so emotionally engaged that they're not thinking rationally when the cops show up.  Those up to trouble have a huge incentive to resist order; and those who are irrational do everything to rationalize their behavior after-the-fact.  That's natural, but to place the blame on the individuals who get called to control deviance or reestablish order is often an unjust pursuit.

 

I do think we need to have permission to find social and economic truth for the folks we should be partnering with in policing.  If we give up the power and partner with them, we'll find (and so will they) that they want order and deviance control, too; but it will be under their terms not ours.  We need to have a little faith that it will make sense; and, we should retain the power to ensure the system isn't hijacked by another power group.

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Khalil Muhammad on Facing Our Racial Past | Moyers & Company

Khalil Muhammad on Facing Our Racial Past | Moyers & Company | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Bill and Khalil Gibran Muhammad, head of the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and author of The Condemnation of Blackness, discuss the importance of confronting the contradictions of America’s past to better understand the present.


Muhammad describes the New York City Police Department’s “Stop and Frisk” program as “an old and enduring form of surveillance and racial control”:


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Artifacts show a Rosa Parks steeped in freedom struggle from childhood

Artifacts show a Rosa Parks steeped in freedom struggle from childhood | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


When Rosa Parks was a little girl in rural Alabama, she would stay up at night, keeping watch with her grandfather as he stood guard with a shotgun against marauding members of the Ku Klux Klan.


Klansmen often terrorized black communities in the early 1900s, and
Parks’s grandfather, Sylvester Edwards, the son of a white plantation owner, had their house boarded up for protection.


But Parks longed for a showdown.


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Community Village Sites's insight:


Thank you @michaelruane and thank you for sharing @BrentNYT  
 

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