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Amazing People

Amazing People | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

Former first lady Jackie Kennedy and Coretta Scott King at Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1968 funeral.

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Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent: Eduardo Galeano


Book Description


Since its U.S. debut a quarter-century ago, this brilliant text has set a new standard for historical scholarship of Latin America. It is also an outstanding political economy, a social and cultural narrative of the highest quality, and perhaps the finest description of primitive capital accumulation since Marx.


Rather than chronology, geography, or political successions, Eduardo Galeano has organized the various facets of Latin American history according to the patterns of five centuries of exploitation. Thus he is concerned with gold and silver, cacao and cotton, rubber and coffee, fruit, hides and wool, petroleum, iron, nickel, manganese, copper, aluminum ore, nitrates, and tin. These are the veins which he traces through the body of the entire continent, up to the Rio Grande and throughout the Caribbean, and all the way to their open ends where they empty into the coffers of wealth in the United States and Europe. 


...


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Community Village Sites's insight:


Food can freely move across borders.


Money can freely move across borders.


Businesses can freely move across borders. 


Raw materials can freely move across borders. 


Manufacturing can freely move across borders. 


Manufactured goods can freely move across borders. 


People are highly restricted from moving across borders, especially the poor who most desire to. 


People should have the freedom and liberty to move where the resources, jobs and infrastructure are located. 


People should have the freedom and liberty to move their body to escape drought, famine, war, violence, and poverty. 

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The black Victorians: astonishing portraits unseen for 120 years

The black Victorians: astonishing portraits unseen for 120 years | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


From the African Choir posing like Vogue models to an Abyssinian prince adopted by an explorer, a new exhibition spotlights the first black people ever photographed in Britain, writes Sean O’Hagan


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10 Female Revolutionaries That You Probably Didn't Learn About In History class

10 Female Revolutionaries That You Probably Didn't Learn About In History class | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


We all know male revolutionaries like Che Guevara, but history often tends to gloss over the contributions of female revolutionaries that have sacrificed their time, efforts, and lives to work towards burgeoning systems and ideologies. Despite misconceptions, there are tons of women that have participated in revolutions throughout history, with many of them playing crucial roles. They may come from different points on the political spectrum, with some armed with weapons and some armed with nothing but a pen, but all fought hard for something that they believed in.


Let’s take a look at 10 of these female revolutionaries from all over the world that you probably won’t ever see plastered across a college student’s T-shirt.


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dj Goddessa's curator insight, September 12, 3:50 PM

Posted the only one I knew, check the rest ...

 

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History, Currency, and Answering "How Much Would That Be Today?"

History, Currency, and Answering "How Much Would That Be Today?" | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


In History classes, we regularly talk about the cost of various items. The cost of voyages to the United States, the price of an enslaved person, the price of everyday necessities, or the price of war, for example.

Converting money is difficult for a number of reasons. First, “money” is so extremely subjective and relative. There is nothing “natural” and nothing that “makes sense” that says “x” should cost “y.” It is all a social construction based on always-changing social mores and notions of supply and demand.


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Community Village Sites's insight:


I heard that the average U.S. citizen earns a million dollars in their lifetime.

I always think about when I hear how much a person was compensated for being wrongly imprisoned.

But time is worth more than money because we can not get the time back and we don't know at what age we will die. 


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Segregated By Law

Segregated By Law | Community Village World History | Scoop.it

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The "Separate but Equal" doctrine, enshrined by the Plessy ruling, remained valid until 1954, when it was overturned by the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education and later outlawed completely by the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964. Though the Plessy case did not involve education, it formed the legal basis of separate school systems for the following fifty-eight years.


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Lynching in the West: 1850–1935


At least 350 lynchings occurred in the state of California between 1850 and 1935. The majority were perpetrated against Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans; more Latinos were lynched in California than were persons of any other race or ethnicity.


VIDEO interview of author here


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Map: Time-lapse of American seizure of indigenous land, 1776-1887

Map: Time-lapse of American seizure of indigenous land, 1776-1887 | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


“Between 1776 and 1887, the United States seized over 1.5 billion acres from America’s indigenous people by treaty and executive order.”


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The Holocaust

The Holocaust | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Jews soon discovered, and Tutsis later found, that one of the shocking things about a genocide is how little the outside world seems to care. While most people did not find out till 1945, top people in Germany, Britain, the US and the Catholic Church, people like President Roosevelt and Pope Pius XII, knew – and did surprisingly little.


Hitler was not surprised:
 ever the student of history, he had the Armenian and Native American genocides before him as models.


Community Village Sites's insight:


Hitler killed himself. But the U.S. continues atrocities.


Vietnam’s government says that 400,000 people were killed or maimed from the after effects of the Agent Orange drops, and 500,000 children were born with birth defects.



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Amistad

Amistad | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


“Amistad” (1997) is a Steven Spielberg film about the slave uprising led by Joseph Cinque in 1839 on a Spanish ship named Friendship – La Amistad.


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He Didn't Reveal A Truth About Himself Until He Was Almost 70. Then His Career Really Took Off.

He Didn't Reveal A Truth About Himself Until He Was Almost 70. Then His Career Really Took Off. | Community Village World History | Scoop.it
At 5, he was imprisoned. At 28, he was a famous spaceman. At 68, he did something much, much better.
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Enumerate Tabulate Exclude

Enumerate Tabulate Exclude | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Highlights from Professor Carrie Nordlund's article.


MEASURING ASIANS, THEN EXCLUDING THEM


The U.S. Census Bureau, while appearing to play an information-gathering role, has proved to be a powerful political tool.


Much can be gleaned from context. It appears that Congress was under increasing pressure from California elected officials who wanted to enumerate Chinese because of basic xenophobic fears.


The combination of xenophobia, fears of labor competition and the hard numerical evidence supplied by the census that the Chinese population was growing fast (from 56,179 in 1870 to 105,465 in 1880, an 87% increase over 10 years) pushed Congress to pass the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This Act was the most restrictive immigration bill the country had witnessed in its short history.


Senator Cameron (R-WI) stated in 1882: “the Anglo-Saxon race will possess the Pacific slope or the [other] race will possess it.”


Some other race” (SOR) appeared on the census for the first time in 1910 .


The SOR category measured numerically small Asian groups: Koreans, Samoans, Malays and Polynesians.


Seven years after these Asian groups were enumerated the Immigration Act of 1917 prohibited people from the “Asiatic barred zone” to immigrate to the U.S.


U.S. borders were reopened to Asia in 1952.


Past census categories often reflected racial fears rather than an apolitical quest for information



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Stokely Carmichael AKA Kwame Ture

Stokely Carmichael AKA Kwame Ture | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Stokely Carmichael, later known as Kwame Ture, was a Trinidadian born black activist, civil rights leader, and the fourth Chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and a notable activist during the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. He was preceded as Chairman of SNCC by John Lewis and followed H. Rap Brown as leader of the group. Ture later became an Honorary Minister of the Black Panther Party. The noted scholar Molefi Kete Asante listed Carmichael as one of his 100 Greatest African Americans.


Carmichael was a well-educated man attending the elite, selective Bronx High School of Science in New York and graduated from Howard University with a degree in philosophy. His professors included Sterling Brown, Nathan Hare, and Toni Morrison, a writer who later won the Nobel Prize. While at Howard, Carmichael joined the Nonviolent Action Group (NAG), the Howard campus affiliate of the SNCC, where he was introduced to Bayard Rustin who became an influential adviser to SNCC. Inspired by the sit-ins in the South, Carmichael became more active in the Civil Rights Movement. He once remarked that he was arrested many times for his activism that he lost count; sometimes estimating at least 29 or 32.


In 1964 Carmichael, then one of the leaders of the SNCC and became Chairman of SNCC in 1966, taking over from John Lewis, who later became a US Congressman. A few weeks after Carmichael took office James Meredith was shot and wounded by a shotgun during his solitary “March Against Fear”. Carmichael became involved joined Dr. Marin Luther King, Floyd McKissick, Cleveland Sellers and others to continue Meredith’s march.


He was arrested during the march where upon his release; he gave his first “Black Power” speech, using the phrase to urge black pride and socio-economic independence. He is largely credited as the person who coined the phrase “Black Power”. He said during that speech “It is a call for black people in this country to unite, to recognize their heritage, to build a sense of community. It is a call for black people to define their own goals, to lead their own organizations.”

While Black Power was not a new concept, Carmichael’s speech brought it into the spotlight and it became a rallying cry for young African Americans across the country. According to Carmichael: “Black Power meant black people coming together to form a political force and either electing representatives or forcing their representatives to speak their needs rather than relying on established parties”.


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Ely Samuel Parker, Seneca

Ely Samuel Parker, Seneca | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Ely Samuel Parker (1828 – August 31, 1895), (born Hasanoanda, later known as Donehogawa) was a Seneca attorney, engineer, and tribal diplomat. He was commissioned a lieutenant colonel during the American Civil War, when he served as adjutant to General Ulysses S. Grant. He wrote the final draft of the Confederate surrender terms at Appomattox. Later in his career, Parker rose to the rank of Brevet Brigadier General, one of only two Native Americans to earn a general’s rank during the war.  President Grant appointed him as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the first Native American to hold that post.  He served as Chief of the six Iroquois Nations, consisting of the Tuscaroras, Cayugas, Senecas, Mohawks, Oneidas, and Onondagas.


Parker was born in 1828 as the sixth of seven children to William and Elizabeth Parker, of prominent Seneca families, at Indian Falls, New York (then part of the Tonawanda Reservation).  He was named Ha-sa-no-an-da and later baptized Ely Samuel Parker. His father was a miller and a Baptist minister.  Ely had a classical education at a missionary school, was fully bilingual, and went on to college.


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Malcolm X's Daughter Exposes Farrakhan (The Extended Clip)


Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan admits in a 60 Minutes interview and reported on CBS Evening News that his incendiary rhetoric played a role in the 1965 assassination of civil rights leader Malcolm X.


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Ejecución en Sudáfrica 1922

Ejecución en Sudáfrica 1922 | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


This shows me the brutality of ALL executions. 


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"Nothing Happened Here": History vs. history

"Nothing Happened Here": History vs. history | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


On the first or second day of class each semester, I always do some version of my "What is History?" lesson with students. This lesson introduces major ideas and terms (such as agency, mores, etc) ...


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The Holocaust - Podcast Lecture Series #1

The Holocaust - Podcast Lecture Series #1 | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Students love learning about the Holocaust because they hear bits and pieces of this tragedy for ever and ever but seldom hear any depth. I have prepared a two hour podcast that I have students listen to (there, sadly, isn’t enough time to do it face-to-face) that is mostly about the Holocaust but also includes information about other human atrocities of the era. 


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Du Bois: The Souls of White Folk

Du Bois: The Souls of White Folk | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


"In the essay “The Souls of White Folk” (1920), written two years after the end of the First World War, W.E.B. Du Bois saw as probable a second world war and the fight to end white rule in Africa and Asia (of which the Vietnam War was part):"


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Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans

Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations.  (Above is a GIF of the map's time-lapse display; visit the map's page to play with its features.) 


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Survivors of infamous 1921 Tulsa race riot still hope for justice

Survivors of infamous 1921 Tulsa race riot still hope for justice | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


TULSA, Okla. — They called it Black Wall Street.


It was only a 1-square-mile area on the north side of Tulsa, but for blacks in the 1900s, Greenwood was everything the South was not. Filled with black lawyers, doctors and business owners, flush with prosperity, here was an area where African-Americans finally had a chance to make something of themselves, escaping the harsh racism of a nation that deprived them of even the most basic dignities.


A dollar would circulate 19 times before leaving Greenwood, a byproduct of the segregation laws, which kept blacks from shopping anywhere else but also united the community financially. There was affluence and education in Greenwood not seen anywhere else in the country for African-Americans, and each day more people were coming to carve out a piece of the dream for themselves, adding to the prosperity of the neighborhood.


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Hitler: Race and People

Hitler: Race and People | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


“Race and People” is chapter 11 of “Mein Kampf” (1924), the book where Adolf Hitler lays out his political philosophy, 18 years before the Holocaust. In this chapter he talks about how history is best understood in terms of race:


Click through to read more. The comments have some good insights as well. 


Community Village Sites's insight:


The frightening thing is that I hear xenophobic nationalists in the U.S. all the time. 
 

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U.S. History from a Reparations Perspective

U.S. History from a Reparations Perspective | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Stubborn as a Mule 


This is a MUST SEE internationally award winning film that depicts and explores facts of history that are not whole known or taught in any educational system. It is an eye-open look at the concept that makes the case for why reparations should be open for discussion and the necessity for it to be addressed. -John Wills


AWESOME DOCUMENTARY!


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Stand Watie, Cherokee

Stand Watie, Cherokee | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Stand Watie (December 12, 1806 – September 9, 1871; also known as Standhope Uwatie, Degataga (Cherokee: ᏕᎦᏔᎦ), meaning “stand firm”, and Isaac S. Watie) was a leader of the Cherokee Nation and a brigadier general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He commanded the Confederate Indian cavalry of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi, made up mostly of Cherokee, Muskogee and Seminole, and was the final Confederate general in the field to surrender at war’s end.


Watie was born in Oothcaloga, Cherokee Nation (now Calhoun, Georgia) on December 12, 1806, the son of Uwatie (Cherokee for “the ancient one”), a full-blood Cherokee, and Susanna Reese, daughter of a white father and Cherokee mother.

Watie became involved in the dispute over Georgia’s repressive anti-Indian laws. After gold was discovered on Cherokee lands in northern Georgia, thousands of white settlers encroached on Indian lands. There was continuing conflict, and Congress passed the 1830 Indian Removal Act, to relocate all Indians from the Southeast, to lands west of the Mississippi River. In 1832 Georgia confiscated [stole] most of the Cherokee land, despite federal laws to protect Native Americans from state actions. The state sent militia to destroy [vandalize and terrorize] the offices and press of the Cherokee Phoenix, which had published articles against Indian Removal.


Believing that removal was inevitable, the Watie brothers favored securing Cherokee rights by treaty before relocating to Indian Territory.   Watie and his older brother Elias Boudinot were among the Treaty Party leaders who signed the 1835 Treaty of New Echota. The majority of the Cherokee opposed removal, and the Tribal Council and Chief John Ross, of the National Party, refused to ratify the treaty.


In 1835, Watie, his family, and many other Cherokee emigrated to Indian Territory (eastern present-day Oklahoma). They joined some Cherokee who had relocated as early as the 1820s and were known as the “Old Settlers”.


After removal, members of the Cherokee government carried out sentence against Treaty Party men for execution; their giving up tribal lands was a “blood” or capital offense under Cherokee law. Stand Watie, his brother Elias Boudinot, their uncle Major Ridge and cousin John Ridge, along with several other Treaty Party men, were all sentenced to death on 22 June 1839; only Stand Watie survived.


In 1842 Watie encountered James Foreman, whom he recognized as one of his uncle’s executioners, and murdered him.

Watie, a slave holder, developed a successful plantation on Spavinaw Creek in the Indian Territory.


Fearful of the Federal Government and the threat to create a State (Oklahoma) out of most of, what was then, the semi-sovereign “Indian Territory”, a majority of the Cherokee Nation initially voted to support the Confederacy in the American Civil War for pragmatic reasons, though less than a tenth of the Cherokee owned slaves. Watie organized a regiment of cavalry. In October 1861, he was commissioned as colonel in the 1st Cherokee Mounted Rifles.


Although he fought Federal troops, he also led his men in fighting between factions of the Cherokee and in attacks on Cherokee civilians and farms, as well as against the Creek, Seminole and others in Indian Territory who chose to support the Union.


Since most Cherokee were now Union supporters, during the war, General Watie’s family and other Confederate Cherokee took refuge in Rusk and Smith counties of east Texas. The Cherokee and allied warriors became a potent Confederate fighting force that kept Union troops out of southern Indian Territory and large parts of north Texas throughout the war, but spent most of their time attacking other Cherokee.


On June 23, 1865, at Doaksville in the Choctaw Nation, Watie signed a cease-fire agreement with Union representatives for his command, the First Indian Brigade of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi. He was the last Confederate general in the field to surrender.


After the war, Watie was a member of the Cherokee Delegation to the Southern Treaty Commission which renegotiated treaties with the United States.


During the American Civil War and soon after, Watie served as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation (1862–1866). By then, the majority of the tribe supported the Confederacy. A minority supported the Union and refused to ratify his election. The former chief John Ross, a Union supporter, was captured in 1862 by Union forces.


John Ross, Cherokee Chief, had signed an alliance with the Confederacy in 1861, but repudiated it two years later. He reflected the shifting support within the Cherokee Nation, although by then a majority favored the Confederacy. After he was captured by Union forces and ended up in Washington, D.C., Tom Pegg took over as principal chief of the pro-Union Cherokee. Following Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation in January 1863, Pegg called a special session of the Cherokee National Council. On February 18, 1863, it passed a resolution to emancipate all slaves within the boundaries of the Cherokee Nation. Most of the “freed” slaves were held by masters who were part of the pro-Confederate Cherokee, so they did not gain immediate freedom.


Stand Watie was elected principal chief of the pro-Confederate Cherokee, who increasingly outnumbered pro-Union elements. Ross’ supporters, by then in the minority, refused to recognize his election. Open warfare broke out between the “Union Cherokee” and the “Confederate Cherokee” within Indian Territory. After the Civil War ended, both factions sent delegations to Washington, DC. Watie pushed for recognition of a separate “Southern Cherokee Nation”, but never achieved that.


Watie led the Southern Cherokee delegation to Washington after the war to sue for peace, hoping to have tribal divisions recognized. The US government negotiated only with the leaders who had sided with the Union, and named John Ross as principal chief in 1866.


The US government refused to recognize the divisions among the Cherokee. As part of the new treaty, it required the Cherokee free their slaves. The Southern Cherokee wanted the government to pay to relocate the Cherokee Freedmen from their lands. The Northern Cherokee suggested adopting them into the tribe, but wanted the federal government to give the Freedman an exclusive piece of associated territory. The federal government required that the Cherokee Freedmen would receive full rights for citizenship, land, and annuities as the Cherokee. It assigned them land in the Canadian addition. In the treaty of 1866, the government declared John Ross as the rightful Principal Chief.


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Chinese Americans in Mississippi under Jim Crow

Chinese Americans in Mississippi under Jim Crow | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Chinese Americans in Mississippi under Jim Crow (1877-1967) were classified as “colored”. In the 1920s, when it started to affect the education of their children, they fought back. By the 1950s they were almost “white”.


What being “colored” meant for them:


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The Incomplete List of US Companies & Universities That Benefited From Black Slavery

The Incomplete List of US Companies & Universities That Benefited From Black Slavery | Community Village World History | Scoop.it


Americans tend to think that only the South or only slave traders and slave owners benefited from slavery.


But it was not that simple.
 Slaves and land were the main forms of wealth in the US before 1860. Therefore slaves figured in insurance policies and bank loans. Therefore universities turned to slave owners and slave traders to raise money. Industry in the North and in Britain made money processing slave-grown tobacco, cotton and sugar from the South and the Caribbean. Railway companies used slave labour. The most profitable activity on Wall Street was – the slave trade.


For example:


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