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The Boston Bombings and the Cognitive Limits of Empathy

The Boston Bombings and the Cognitive Limits of Empathy | Community service | Scoop.it

From Situationist friend and Harvard Law School 3L, Kate Epstein, an essay about Monday's tragedy:

 

As I hear reactions to the bombings at the marathon on Monday, I find myself agreeing with Glenn Greenwald’s column inThe Guardian, titled “The Boston bombing produces familiar and revealing reactions: As usual, the limits of selective empathy, the rush to blame Muslims, and the exploitation of fear all instantly emerge.” Particularly interesting to me are our cognitive limits, as humans, when it comes to empathy.

 

Greenwald writes:

The widespread compassion for yesterday’s victims and the intense anger over the attacks was obviously authentic and thus good to witness. But it was really hard not to find oneself wishing that just a fraction of that compassion and anger be devoted to attacks that the US perpetrates rather than suffers. These are exactly the kinds of horrific, civilian-slaughtering attacks that the US has been bringing to countries in the Muslim world over and over and over again for the last decade, with very little attention paid.


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The Transformational Leadership Quiz | Are You Evolutionary?

The Transformational Leadership Quiz | Are You Evolutionary? | Community service | Scoop.it
Are You an Evolutionary? For the following statements, assign a numerical value (1–5) based on your level of agreement with the statement. Use the scoring structure provided below.

Via Susan Bainbridge
Kevin Sutton's insight:

Scored 297, which makes me 'Guilded'. I guess I still have some more work to do.

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It’s About Making Sense, NOT decisions

It’s About Making Sense, NOT decisions | Community service | Scoop.it

Cumbersome decision-making processes, cognitive biases that favor existing mindsets, and a false sense of the permanence of decisions can all work against leaders’ ability to sense and adapt to rapidly changing realities.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Kevin Sutton's insight:

Make snes instead of decisions!

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John Michel's curator insight, July 2, 2013 10:37 PM

To stand a better chance of anticipating their own futures, organizations need to supplement their current decision-making infrastructures with more lightweight approaches to making sense of the world

donhornsby's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:09 AM

(From the article): When I was in government I would sometimes hear the question: “Are you suggesting that I revisit the decision we made a year ago?” It was a scary question; it implied that all the work we had done to staff the issue was somehow in vain and, even worse, that the official should risk appearing indecisive or lacking in conviction. Now I believe that that type of questioning is not only necessary, but perhaps the most important responsibility of a corporate team. The future belongs to those who revisit their decisions early and often.

Gary Bamford's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:22 PM

Boy - that's well on the money!

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Seven Principles of Transformational Leadership

Seven Principles of Transformational Leadership | Community service | Scoop.it
Leadership comes in various forms, such as the civil rights leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the political leadership of John F. Kennedy, and the managerial leadership of a small business ...

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Rescooped by Kevin Sutton from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Strategy, Storytelling, and Being a Detective

Strategy, Storytelling, and Being a Detective | Community service | Scoop.it

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Karen Dietz's comment, April 29, 2013 11:22 PM
It's spam Jose! I've already deleted the multiple spam postings to my comments today.
Samantha Rissel's curator insight, April 30, 2013 9:12 AM

How is business related to literature?  What cultural traits help us know more about our ventures?

Sarosh Daruwalla's curator insight, April 30, 2013 9:51 AM

In an era where the quick fix is often celebrated, bringing in different perspectives to the table will only enhance the final decision making to be more focused and in the right direction.

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Non-profit wants to clone the world's oldest trees to reforest the ...

Non-profit wants to clone the world's oldest trees to reforest the ... | Community service | Scoop.it
Let's say that some trees have great genes that allow them to live for millennia and grow to be almost as big as skyscrapers, but that because they are so big, they are ideal targets for lumberjacks so they almost all get cut ...
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Rescooped by Kevin Sutton from Start Empathy
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How to Talk to Children about the Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting

How to Talk to Children about the Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting | Community service | Scoop.it
Renowned child psychiatrist, Dr. Pamela Cantor, answers the questions on many parents' minds in light of the tragedy in Newtown, CT.

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The Ashoka Community's curator insight, April 16, 2013 3:59 PM

In the wake of Newtown and the Boston Marathon bombing, here are some great ways Dr. Pamela Cantor recommends discussing tragic events with children. 

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The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people | Community service | Scoop.it

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people, essential in our development
"The study of neuroplasticity is changing the way scientists think about the...

 

“Relationship is key,” he emphasizes. “When we work with relationship, we work with brain structure. Relationship stimulates us and is essential in our development. People rarely mention relationship in brain studies, but it provides vital input to the brain. Every form of psychotherapy that works, works because it creates healthier brain function and structure.… In approaching our lives, we can ask where do we experience the chaos or rigidity that reveal where integration is impaired.

 

We can then use the focus of our attention to integrate both our brain and our relationships. Ultimately we can learn to be open in an authentic way to others, and to ourselves. The outcome of such an integrative presence is not only a sense of deep well-being and compassion for ourselves and others, but also an opening of the doors of awareness to a sense of the interdependence of everything. ‘We’ are indeed a part of an interconnected whole.””

 

Patty de Llosa

 

 


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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, October 7, 2013 6:04 AM


“We is what me is!”

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 12, 11:34 PM

The network of "I" is connected to the network that is "us" in an upward gradient.

 

There can be no full "I" without "we", because all humans have to be socialized, like any other social animal, in order to develop fully as individual human beings.

 

We are all connected to one another and the environment to form one web on this planet.  It affects us and we affect it, sometimes for good, sometimes for bad, depending upon what we do to it consciously and subconsciously.

 

Why listen to the individualists who have absolutely no sense or desire to connect with the other that is around them and that has helped form them as individuals, psychologically, physically and socially?

 

They are not in touch with the actual world, and are probably just of a pathological mindset that, I think, needs to be treated as a disease by our society.

 

We are all one.

 

What you do effects all those who are around you and are connected to you.

 

And, most importantly, what you do to them/it is the same thing that you do to yourself, as an individual.

 

Think about it.

 

Libertarians.

 

Conservatives.

 

Think about it.

LUZ DEL MAR's curator insight, August 25, 8:57 PM

mente - cerebro- relaciones

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Paul Bloom: The Case Against Empathy

Paul Bloom: The Case Against Empathy | Community service | Scoop.it
Empathy research is thriving these days. Several new books enthusiastically champion an increase in empathy as a cure for humanity’s ills. This enthusiasm may be misplaced, however.

 

In 2008, Karina Encarnacion, an eight year-old girl from Missouri, wrote to President-elect Barack Obama with some advice about what kind of dog he should get for his daughters. She also suggested that he enforce recycling and ban unnecessary wars. Obama wrote to thank her, and offered some advice of his own: “If you don’t already know what it means, I want you to look up the word ‘empathy’ in the dictionary. I believe we don’t have enough empathy in our world today, and it is up to your generation to change that.

This wasn’t the first time Obama had spoken up for empathy.


Via Edwin Rutsch
Kevin Sutton's insight:

Empathy alone is not enough.

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David Hain's comment, May 14, 2013 2:30 AM
Such are the paradoxes of empathy. The power of this faculty has something to do with its ability to bring our moral concern into a laser pointer of focussed attention. If a planet of billions is to survive, however, we’ll need to take into consideration the welfare of people not yet harmed—and, even more, of people not yet born. They have no names, faces, or stories to grip our conscience or stir our fellow-feeling. Their prospects call, rather, for deliberation and calculation. Our hearts will always go out to the baby in the well; it’s a measure of our humanity. But empathy will have to yield to reason if humanity is to have a future.
David Hain's comment, May 14, 2013 2:31 AM
Very interesting discussion that in my view belies it's title - must read.
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:24 PM

Fantastic scoop David, thank you!

 

From the article:

 

In a thoughtful new book on bullying, “Sticks and Stones” (Random House), Emily Bazelon writes,

 

“The scariest aspect of bullying is the utter lack of empathy”—a diagnosis that she applies not only to the bullies but also to those who do nothing to help the victims.

 

Few of those involved in bullying, she cautions, will turn into full-blown psychopaths. Rather, the empathy gap is situational: bullies have come to see their victims as worthless; they have chosen to shut down their empathetic responses. But most will outgrow—and perhaps regret—their terrible behavior.

 

“The key is to remember that almost everyone has the capacity for empathy and decency—and to tend that seed as best as we possibly can,” she maintains.

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5 Habits Of Leaders Who Create Workspace Culture

5 Habits Of Leaders Who Create Workspace Culture | Community service | Scoop.it
When I was a student (once upon a time I thought I was to be a clinical psychologist), and broke, and spending time in New York City (when I decided I was not to be a performing artist, choreographer for my career after all), I used to make extra ...

Via Susan Bainbridge
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John Michel's curator insight, May 13, 2013 7:27 AM

How can you make your space a dynamic part of your vision and mission, and a driver of success? Here are 5 habits and how to make this happen:

David Hain's curator insight, May 14, 2013 2:37 AM

Unusual take on leadership, but worth thinking about...

ratzelster's curator insight, May 21, 2013 9:19 AM

More and more we're seeing how the physical space sets a tone and helps to create culture.  With so many of the classrooms and communal spaces fixed and with little $$$ to change those structures, what can we do to make a big change in how the physical space impacts us? 

Rescooped by Kevin Sutton from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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How to Really Understand Someone Else's Point of View

How to Really Understand Someone Else's Point of View | Community service | Scoop.it
It's a necessary prerequisite for persuasion. (Good post on how to understand another's point of view.

Via Karen Dietz
Kevin Sutton's insight:

More and more empathy is being recognized as a ability possessed by great leaders. Yet somehow it remains absent in current educational curriculums. Is this a hinderance to the development of our future great leaders?

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SooJin-Stella Lee's comment, April 30, 2013 7:08 AM
Thank you ^^ I definitely need these sort of information. And I learend lots of things from your strategies to do well in scoop.it.
Karen Dietz's comment, April 30, 2013 11:47 AM
My pleasure Soo-Jin. Keep up the good work!
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:24 PM

Put yourself in the other person's shoes.

Rescooped by Kevin Sutton from Empathy and Compassion
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The Boston Bombings and the Cognitive Limits of Empathy

The Boston Bombings and the Cognitive Limits of Empathy | Community service | Scoop.it

From Situationist friend and Harvard Law School 3L, Kate Epstein, an essay about Monday's tragedy:

 

As I hear reactions to the bombings at the marathon on Monday, I find myself agreeing with Glenn Greenwald’s column inThe Guardian, titled “The Boston bombing produces familiar and revealing reactions: As usual, the limits of selective empathy, the rush to blame Muslims, and the exploitation of fear all instantly emerge.” Particularly interesting to me are our cognitive limits, as humans, when it comes to empathy.

 

Greenwald writes:

The widespread compassion for yesterday’s victims and the intense anger over the attacks was obviously authentic and thus good to witness. But it was really hard not to find oneself wishing that just a fraction of that compassion and anger be devoted to attacks that the US perpetrates rather than suffers. These are exactly the kinds of horrific, civilian-slaughtering attacks that the US has been bringing to countries in the Muslim world over and over and over again for the last decade, with very little attention paid.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.