Community organisations and groups
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Community organisations and groups
A ScoopIt site for teachers of stage 2 Sydney students. These resources relate to HSIE outcome SSS2.8 (Board of Studies, 2006, p.21), while offering a closer look at an array of Sydney community groups and organisations. (Note: the background image is a 1980 Sydney Community Art Project. The mural was painted by local artists in collaboration with Rozelle Child and Youth Services. Sourced from http://www.islandcontinent.com.au/community-murals-in-oz-1982/).
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The goals of community programs

The goals of community programs | Community organisations and groups | Scoop.it
Gloveridge's insight:

This online image would act as a great introduction to a lesson sequence on participation in community life. This honeycomb diagram explicitly addresses outcome Sss2.8, outlining the broad contributions and benefits community programs can make to community life. As a whole class the students will explore one local community group or organisation. The City of Sydney website (http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/community) might be a useful teaching resource when choosing an appropriate local group for students. If the group has a website, the class might explore its website on an IWB. The class will collaboratively construct a factsheet about this group focusing on WHO runs the group, WHO the group is for, WHAT the group does, WHERE the group is, WHY the group is in place etc. (the teacher might choose to type this factsheet up and give it to students at a later time). The students will then independently fill in a ‘concept’ or ‘web’ map (similar to http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/webmap.pdf). This type of diagram is a similar structure to the honeycomb diagram, with a central idea in the middle surrounded by related ideas (each of equal importance but different emphasis). In this case, the chosen community group will be in the centre of the diagram and the six goals of community groups (see above) will surround it. The students will further extend this diagram by adding specific examples of how this group meets each of the goals. This worksheet can act as an assessment. The teacher can assess how well the students understood the instructions, and their understanding of how ideas link in a concept map. The teacher can also assess students’ evaluative skills in their choice of specific examples. The use of diagrams in this task links it to KLA Mathematics.This lesson could conclude with a brief discussion about why community groups are important to community life, linking the lesson back to the outcome Sss2.8 and subject matter.

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Heaps Decent | ‘Central Kids’

Heaps Decent | ‘Central Kids’ | Community organisations and groups | Scoop.it
Gloveridge's insight:

This is the website of community music initiative Heaps Decent, an organisation dedicated to promoting and “nurturing the creativity of indigenous young people”. This is a Sydney based group however it works in disadvantaged Indigenous communities all over Australia. On this page the clip ‘Central Kids’ is a resource embedded with a positive Indigenous perspective. It portrays ten contemporary Indigenous children from Wilcannia Central School and the Wilcannia Community Centre, rapping about themselves and what they enjoy to do. The chorus of the rap is “I’m 100% Aborigine” promoting and nurturing indigenous pride and identity. The featured children wrote their own verses and collaborated with staff from Heaps Decent to produce the track. This resource presents Aboriginal culture as “living, dynamic and changing” (Craven, R., 2013, The Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies Resources).  A major part of this organisations’ philosophy is to support “positive futures”. They do this through collaboratively developing explicit goals for kids and providing role models. Staff members have in the past promoted the initiative at inner west schools with kids from the Redfern drop-in centre Home Base performing and then talking about the organisation. It would be an invaluable learning experience to invite Indigenous mentors from Heaps Decent in to the classroom to talk about the program and what it offers to the community. “Indigineous people alone possess necessary knowledge, skills and experience to give authenticity to Indigenous perspectives in schools” (Morgan, B., 2012).

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Green Villages Sydney - Creating a more sustainable city

Green Villages Sydney - Creating a more sustainable city | Community organisations and groups | Scoop.it
Gloveridge's insight:

Green Villages is a City of Sydney community organisation that promotes environmental sustainability. Green Villages runs free workshops, provides environmental grants and constructs community gardens. Though not a particularly engaging website for younger people, this page is filled with information about what this program does and how the individual can participate to work towards a more sustainable Sydney. This website could form the basis of an excursion to The Green Living Centre in Newtown, the home of Green Villages, where tours run on a daily basis with ideas for sustainable living. This excursion could conclude with a visit to a nearby Newtown Community Garden established by Green Villages. This excursion will really demonstrate to the students the direct impact and benefits of a specific community project as well as “how participation can contribute to the wellbeing of community life” (k6 HSIE Syllabus, 2006). Once back in the classroom students can reflect on their excursion, “the ability to reflect on thinking is a crucial part of any learning experience” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). Scaffold this individual writing task by providing some questions for students to answer; What is Green Villages? What do they do? Who are they? How is the community involved? Etc. As an extension task students can look at this recent online article about sustainable living http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2013/04/19/3740653.htm

and in small groups discuss how community involvement in groups like Green Villages could help in the case of extreme weather events. 

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'Students Helping Students' across the globe

'Students Helping Students' across the globe | Community organisations and groups | Scoop.it

“Learning about social issues helps students develop empathy and global awareness.” John Wood, founder of Room to Read

Gloveridge's insight:

The Students Helping Students KIDS website is easy to navigate, colourful and engaging. Room to Read is an NGO dedicated to improving global literacy. There are three drop menu options on the Kids page; ‘Learn about our work’, ‘Take Action’ and ‘Get Connected’. This website offers students a chance to learn about the countries and communities that Room to Read helps in. The website offers engaging student resources like a Room to Read passport which students can print out and fill in using information from ‘Explore Africa’ or ‘Explore Asia’ links. These links lead students to profiles on each of the countries in Asia and Africa that Room to Read works in. These profiles are in PDF format so are printable, they are brief, well laid out, colourful and engaging. Reading the profiles will require students to use literacy strategies such as decoding the text, to evaluate most relevant and important information for the passports. As an extension task, students might do independent creative writing where they write a diary entry from the point of view of a child from one of the countries Room to Read works in, using information from the profiles. Students should focus on describing the childs lifestyle, education and environment. The ‘Take Action’ and ‘Get Connected’ options on the main page details the services provided by this organisation, as well as suggesting ways students can participate, which links back to the syllabus outcome Sss2.8. 

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A community program helping African refugees find their feet

A community program helping African refugees find their feet | Community organisations and groups | Scoop.it
Australia is known as a multicultural country because people from all over the world come to live here. For refugees who now call Australia home it's a fresh start but it's also a big adjustment.
Gloveridge's insight:

BTN is an engaging resource to introduce young people to the world of news. This high-energy news clip “Refugee kids” explores the benefits of a community program aimed towards African refugee boys. The program is called “Imagine the Future” and uses ‘adventure therapy’ as a means of building young boys’ skills, resistance and confidence so they can better engage with Australian communities. Before watching this clip introduce the students to the idea that different community programs have different purposes and serve different people or groups within a community. After the students have watched the film, discuss the segment and the students’ thoughts on it. The teacher should lead and support the discussion asking students what they think of the clip, who the clip is about, how this community program helps, why might these people need help etc. Conversation-based teaching can promote deeper thinking, develop critical learning, and promote fair mindedness, optimism, courage and curiosity in students (Dufficy, 2010, Expanding Talk Roles in the Classroom). Ask the students to think about different groups in their local community. Write down the students’ suggestions on whiteboard in a mind-map. As a take-home task, students must create an advertisement for a new local community group. They must present their ad on an A3 poster which includes the name of their community group as the title, the aim of the group, who the community group serves, who runs the group, what the group does, where the group takes place. Encourage students to be as creative as possible. 

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