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Our World Bardijaawi – Life at Ardiyooloon //One Arm Point Remote Community School

Our World Bardijaawi – Life at Ardiyooloon //One Arm Point Remote Community School | [Community Goods] Services and Facilities | Scoop.it
Niki Karydis's insight:

The perspectives of marginalized groups are important because they tell us things about our society which dominant perspectives do not. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p 102) suggest that “in studying power and inequality in society, accurate, undistorted knowledge will only come from the standpoint of those least advantaged in our society since they have the greatest interest in revealing how inequality in society is actually produced”. Connell (1989) also highlights the need to consider “accurate, up-to-date, undistorted information from a variety of sources and standpoints, not sources that serve the interest of dominant groups in society”. This is why it’s important to integrate an authentic Indigenous perspective in all KLA’s rather than overlooking it, considering it as less important - as it often is - or relegating it to a simply tokenistic inclusion or afterthought.

 

This is a fantastic resource that presents an authentic Indigenous perspective on the provision of goods and services by focusing on one particular remote community school called One Arm Point. Not only does it function as a topic-by-topic case study of this particular community but it also presents the reader with relevant words translated into the dialect of the local indigenous community.

Since food is a consumable good that is universally essential to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, this could be a helpful basis for a comparison of similarities and differences between the two cultures. With students, it could be an interesting and informative endeavor to compare the food-collecting habits of the Indigenous people recorded in this book and the way they themselves and their families ‘collect’ food today. Whilst identifying similarities and differences could be a task completed as a class, you could then split the class into two to debate the advantages and disadvantages of shopping locally or centrally (large shopping centres) as opposed to cultivating food just for themselves, their family and their local commuinty.

 

Again, to get the students thinking locally, so that ‘Indigenous culture’ does not become a far-off notion, detached from their own lives, you could extend the invitation to a local Aboriginal elder to share traditional eating habits of their ancestors on local Aboriginal land:

 

-What did they eat?

-How did they prepare it?

-Who gathered the food?

-Who prepared it?

-Was there any plant or animal that was 'out-of-bounds'?

-What other usable or wearable goods did they make out of local/natural materials?

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Gateway Greening: Building a Community Garden - YouTube

celebrating PACT's community garden initiatives to encourage more local growing of vegetables and herbs in spare spaces in and around Penrith
Niki Karydis's insight:

This is a promotional video clip made by an American organisation called Gateway Greening. The organisation was founded in response to the increasing acres of farmable land that are being taken over for development. Gateway Greening is just one organisation of many that partners with local communities to help make use of small urban plots of land for planting produce. 

 

It would be both a fun and valuable pursuit to initiate a community garden project on a plot of council land that is close to the school (within walking distance for students) or on school property.The benefits would be manifold and the opportunities for cross-curricular links is endless! (e.g Mathematics - measurement units needed to plan the garden bed layout, PDHPE - positive relationships between consumers and producers, Science and Technology - the processes people use to produce goods, commodities and services, amongst others!). Once the garden is well established and the students have developed confidence in the processes involved in maintaining it, they could write an information report about their communal garden.

This would need to be well-scaffolded by the teacher through ample discussion, modelling and joint construction of an information report (possibly about shopping in other communities or the way food is produced, prepared and shared in Indigenous culture) before giving students the opportunity to practice it individually as an assessment item. The desired goal is that it would arouse in students a sense of shared responsibility and a greater confidence in their personal ability to make 'healthy' decisions for their community and world. 

 

An implication of student learning is that they would consider and act on their responsibilities within and towards a community system of goods and services. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) highlight that "pedagogies in human rights, social justice and diversity education that offer powerful learning are those that engage students by going beyond acquisition of knowledge. They present authentic scenarios and real life case studies that require students to critically think and respond. They provide opportunities for student participation and action beyond the classroom" (p 373). The beauty in this clip is in the inspiration that it gives rise to, to do something to impact the community positively, and to be a responsible consumer and producer. 

 

To tie in a global perspective (which, in any case, cannot be evaded since Gateway Greening is an American organisation and the statistics are pertinent to America) students could investigate global interdependence regarding grocery goods. Having been given a recording proforma by their teacher, students could look into their pantry and fridge at home and record the source of different food items with labels. This could then be used as a stimulus for classroom discussion and further learning. 

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

McInerney, D & McInerney, V. (2010) Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. 5th edition. Pearson Australia.

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How sustainable is your smartphone? - interactive

How sustainable is your smartphone? - interactive | [Community Goods] Services and Facilities | Scoop.it
Smartphones are owned by one in five people and have changed how many of the world's most important industries work – from journalism to farming. But their production carries a cost; using more than 40 elements that are mined with untold environmental and social effects on every inhabited continent on earth. Use our interactive to take a detailed look at positive and negative impacts your smartphone has made on people and planet

Via Maree Whiteley
Niki Karydis's insight:

This clean, user-friendly and interactive online resource presents the sometimes dark and hidden truth behind what makes up a piece of technology that is owned by one fifth of the worlds' population.  Stage 2 is the perfect time to educate students about the use of exhaustible materials or unethical working conditions in making products like the smartphone because they are sprouting the ability to develop a "critical understanding of the issues they investigate" (Marsh, 2010, p16). Not only this, but if students have begun to understand what goes into the construction of an item like this (including the environmental and social effects of these processes) then when the time comes for them to be consumers of such a product, they can make a more informed decision about their purchase.

 

This is not a resource that students would use in the classroom themselves. This is because the language is more advanced than they are most likely able to read for meaning and would probably leave most students feeling frustrated, lost and overwhelmed. It is, however, an extremely helpful resource for teachers to use to source and cite accurate and unbiased information on the issue since the site introduces both the positive and negative effects of smartphones on people and the environment.

 

As a teacher you could plan a learning sequence, utilising case studies, true stories, facts, statistics and other information from this site.  For example, students could conduct a survey of their families and friends to find out how many people own a smartphone. The survey could also investigate peoples reasons for either using or not using a smartphone, and then determine whether these decisions are informed by facts or by accessibility or monetary concerns etc.

These results could then be collated, discussed and jointly graphed. Students would make generalisations about their findings and identify common reasons for either using smartphones or not using them. An activity like this would definitely require an abundance of teacher guidance and support, providing many incremental activities to equip students with the skills needed to both conduct the survey, record their findings informally and to then present their collective findings graphically. If students are adequately challenged and suppoted (McInerney & McInerney, 2010) the endeavour will be rich and enjoyable.

 

 

References:

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher - knowledge, skills & issues. Pearson Australia.

 

McInerney, D & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational psychology: Constructing learning. 5th edition. Pearson Australia.

 

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, March 26, 2014 11:44 PM

Take another look at your smartphone...Use this interactive to take a detailed look at positive and negative impacts your smartphone has made on people and planet

Nastassia Allen's curator insight, April 6, 2015 5:23 AM

It is anticipated that students will realise that they as consumers have great responsibility in their choice and that not everything is regulated. They will be informed of the United Nations Guidelines for Consumer Protection and otherwise under SSS3.7 (NSW Board of Studies, 2006),  they will learn about human rights. To help satisfy English outcomes EN3-1A, EN3-2A and EN3-3A, (NSW Board of Studies, 2012), the teacher could select human rights-focused components of this interactive smartphone for students to investigate further. A storyboard or flow chart format would emphasise the interconnectivity and a “my rights and responsibilities” list contrasting a “producer's rights and responsibilities” list would further highlight the social responsibility that comes with choice and lead into further human rights discussions. The emphasis on the visual assessment could be greater for visual learners and the difficulty of webquests could be altered in light of the inquiry-based research experience of the class and/or individuals (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2014, chap.8). A large printed-out smartphone for the class wall with students' contributions would add to the fun (Maxim, 2003), but highlight the pertinence of the activities, bringing everything together as a textbook often cannot (Brophy & Alleman, 2009).

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and its Environment K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). English K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Brophy, J., & Alleman, J. (2009). Meaningful social studies for elementary students. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. 15(30), 357-376.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences. History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Autralian Curriculum. (5th ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage.

 

Maxim, G.W. (2003). Let the fun begin!: Dynamic social studies for the elementary school classroom. Childhood Education., Vol. 80, 1, 2003.  

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How Big Is Your Shopping Footprint?

How Big Is Your Shopping Footprint? | [Community Goods] Services and Facilities | Scoop.it
Niki Karydis's insight:

This is a quality information book for primary HSIE education. It is published by the award-winning Macmillan Library publishing company who creates primary resources with direct relation to the Australian curriculum. This book is one of a series called “Environmental Footprints” by children’s author Paul Mason. ‘How big is your shopping footprint?’ is one book in the series that examines the impact humans have on the environment as consumers of goods. It is a factual and colourful representation of the shopping industry, its benefits and costs, the manufacture of goods, the different renewable and non-renewable sources required to do so, the various ways that goods are produced and transported, and the way goods are packaged and distributed online.

 

In the Stage 2 classroom, you could employ this book as a stimulus for jointly creating a large flow chart to visualise the processes involved in making and distributing goods to individual people and homes. 

 

Students would need to formulate and answer questions such as:

 

-Where do the goods come from?

-Are they natural or processed?

-How are they prepared for distribution?

-Where are they processed?

-Where are they stored before they go to the shop?

-How are they delivered?

 

NB: Popplet is a fantastic online tool that can be used on either computers or as an ipad app to graphically organize ideas.

http://popplet.com/app/#/public

 

Students could then, in small groups, compile a list of ways that would have a smaller environmental impact and give them a lighter shopping footprint. For example, buying food online, discarding waste responsibly, altering clothes rather than buying new ones, walking/riding to school, encouraging their parents to buy goods that have been grown or manufactured near their home and recycling diligently. To assess students’ understanding of the “social and environmental responsibilities of producers and consumers” (HSIE, 2006) in these same groups, students could pick one of the aforementioned practical steps and design a persuasive poster to encourage people to make lighter environmental footprints. These could then be displayed around the school or even the community with permission.

 

To get students thinking locally about shops and goods-providers in their local community, and also personally, about the way that they choose to interact with these goods-providers, the class could collectively construct an interactive map of their local community or central shopping district. After listing different shops, students could then draw them (i.e. ouline, colour and cut) and arrange them on a section of the classroom wall in a manner roughly representative of the actual community. These would be attached to the walls as flaps so that as you lift each flap, behind it there can be found information about the chain of events required for that shop to stock its goods. As a jigsaw task, groups of students would focus on different goods providers in their community.

 

Alternatively, to link this more creatively with the K-6 Creative Arts syllabus - VAS2.2 Uses the forms to suggest the qualities of subject matter - (BOS, 2000, p24) students could each construct one 3D replica of a goods-provider in their community and arrange them on a flat but movable surface in the classroom. Underneath each model would be the fact sheet about the process of production and distribution. Students could then explore the community jointly constructed with their peers and share in the learning of other groups in their class. 

 

References:

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2000). Creative Arts K-6 syllabus.­ Sydney: Author

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Outback House - arrival of the hawker

Outback House - arrival of the hawker | [Community Goods] Services and Facilities | Scoop.it
Imagine leaving your home to travel back over 150 years ago, to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians...
Niki Karydis's insight:

This is one of numerous fantastic clips from an ABC TV series about the isolated, life of a rural homestead during the 1860's. The aim of the series was to create an authentic and accurate portrayal of 'squatter' life. Painstaking efforts were taken to custom-build a homestead reflective of the era, down to the ivory-coated toothbrush handles. Pair this with the cast who committed to living 'the squatter life' on set for a number of months, and what has resulted is a rich and engaging multimedia resource perfect for use in the classroom. 

 

You could use this clip to provide students with the opportunity to investigate basic needs as well as wants, for food, clothing and entertainment/leisure. Students could use this source within an inquiry-driven investigation to draw comparisons between their current urban context and the rural homestead context of the past - considering the various possible sources for satisfying needs and wants. e.g. for the squatters, these sources are obviously more limited and direct (the farm, home produce and the hawker) than those available to people living in the city/suburbs (local shops, Westfield Shopping Centres and services such as public pools, parks and playlands). In doing this, students will continue to develop explanatory language and will be led to make use of strategies that help present and organise information such as flow charts, retrieval charts and concept maps.

 

Another possible teaching activity could involve students interviewing their grandparents or elderly neighbours about how they used to shop when they were younger and what changes have occurred in their lifetime.  This comparative investigation could culminate in a joint construction of a retrieval chart that categorises the perceived advantage and disadvantages of shopping 'then' and 'now'. Based on interviews and collated information, students could also make their own predictions about changes around our need to shop in the future. This could then be represented in a creative way - i.e. a painted visual representation of a future shopping experience, or a short improvised drama.

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