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Seth's Blog: The most important question | Seth Godin

Seth's Blog: The most important question | Seth Godin | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

It's not:

 

Is my price low enough?

 

Is it reliable enough?

 

Do I offer enough features?

 

Am I on the right social media channels?

 

Is the website cool enough?

 

Am I promising enough?

 

No, the most important question in marketing something to someone who hasn't purchased it before is,..


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 23, 7:40 PM

The secret according to Seth...

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Study: Putting Celebs In Ads Is Ineffective, But Everyone Loves Ellen DeGeneres

Study: Putting Celebs In Ads Is Ineffective, But Everyone Loves Ellen DeGeneres | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

Attaching a star to your brand is something that advertisers have done since the first rock retailer made a cave drawing of Thutronk the Hunter carrying one of his store’s special stones. And yet, science says that people just don’t care, and that it may have a negative impact on your brand.

 

New research from the folks at ad analytics service Ace Metrix, who released a similar study in 2011, claims to confirm that celebrified ads do not generally perform as well as ads with unknown actors who hope to someday be celebrities...

 

The results found that ads without celebrities continue to outscore star-studded ads in all seven facets of the Ace scoring system. It’s not a huge difference, with the overall average score for celeb ads virtually the same as regular non-celeb spots. But Ace says this underscores just how little a difference having a celebrity in your ad makes....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 30, 1:29 AM

Research said celebrities in ads just don't do it for consumers. And they may even hurt your brand. So why do advertisers keep doing it?

Sabrina Shafi's curator insight, January 30, 5:33 AM

Interesting...

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The New 4Ps of Marketing « Saatchi & Saatchi Asia Pacific

The New 4Ps of Marketing « Saatchi & Saatchi Asia Pacific | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

The 4Ps is a concept originally coined in the 1960s by E.J. McCarthy. In short, if you have the right Product, in the right Place, at the right Price, supported by the right Promotion, you will likely have the right marketing mix in place to be successful. It’s an idea that is still taught in many marketing classes and continues to have traction in certain marketing circles. However, in the Age of Now this model seems out of touch with the expectations of empowered consumers. In turn, we are seeing the traditional 4Ps give way to a new set: Purpose, Passion, Participation, and Profit...


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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, December 28, 2013 12:48 PM

Very interesting (and highly relevant to the helping professions such as coaching...) move from the original 4Ps of marketing (the right Product, in the right Place, at the right Price, supported by the right Promotion) to the new 4Ps:

Purpose (what your business stands for),

Passion (all about leveraging the power of your people to build your brand, see Empowerment...), 

Participation (companies are looking for partners with the same values whom they can work with to make a difference and further their reach)

Profit (self-explanatory...)

 

Now, this is not a gobbledygook, these are real elements and here also appears the unavoidable need for a passionate, involved, engaged, aligned and empowered staff... do you understand the importance of this? It is a free advertisement for the helping professions, guys...

Anthony M Turner's curator insight, January 2, 5:12 PM

this makes a lot of sense....

Ashley Pero's curator insight, January 31, 10:45 AM

Great insights on marketing that might make the whole concept seem less foreign to nonprofits.

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Amplification: Content Marketing's Missing Piece | iAcquire

Amplification: Content Marketing's Missing Piece | iAcquire | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

It doesn’t matter how great your content is if nobody ever finds out about it. This post walks through the ins and outs of crafting an effective amplification strategy.I’d like to propose a change to the droning, tired-out mantra of “Create great content.”

 

I’d like us to start saying, “Create – and promote – great content.”The “creation” part is getting all the fuss and hubbub right now, but what I see time and time again are great pieces softly plunked into the infinite space of the web by companies who are just hoping that somehow, somewhere, prince charming will find them and show them to the world...


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 15, 2013 1:22 AM

Without amplification and distribution your content is just a noise maker

S. Thomas's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:05 AM

Super piece!

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Integrated Marketing Communications | Social Media Today

Integrated Marketing Communications | Social Media Today | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

Think about it this way: It used to be you’d have a crisis communication plan written and it would stay in a drawer until your PR team pulled it out the following year, dusted it off, and gave it a good rewrite.

 

I’m sure you see or hear this a lot: Traditional PR is dead! Media relations is dead! Websites are dead! Marketing is dead! Advertising is dead! Newspapers are dead!

 

Granted, sometimes those things are written to motivate people to click on a link, but all of the customary ways of communication are far from dead. Instead, we find it’s necessary to integrate the things that are “dead” with digital public relations....


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Jacques Dupeyroux's curator insight, August 17, 7:05 AM

Social media is rapidly growing to be one of the most powerful IMC tools. Achievable exposure and attainable reach are consistently expanding through social media's growth and popularity.

Jeshneil Prasad's curator insight, October 2, 5:28 PM

The article suggests that integration is essential in today climate because communication between departments within a company can lead to better results regarding a marketing campaign and individual silos should be a thing of the past.

Patience's curator insight, October 2, 9:18 PM

IMC program is used for managing every sized business today.

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Advertisers Should Act More Like Newsrooms | Harvard Business Review

Advertisers Should Act More Like Newsrooms | Harvard Business Review | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

The rise of spontaneous social ads means the end of the ad campaign as we know it. fascinating thing happened at the Super Bowl this year. Typically, Super Bowl advertisers meticulously plan every aspect of their presence months in advance of the big game.

 

But this time, Coca-Cola, Audi, and Oreo didn't just limit themselves to pre-packaged creative — they also had in place rapid response teams that adapted to events as they happened. So when the rest of America was reacting to the power outage in the stadium, the brands were, too — appropriately and in their own brand voice.

 

Recently, the Wharton Future of Advertising Program asked more than 175 industry leaders to describe their vision of what advertising would be like in the year 2020. Based on our analysis of the responses to the 2020 Project, the Super Bowl case isn't just a once-a-year stunt — it's a preview of a model that will scale and become a foundational characteristic of major brand advertising. The industry experts had a varied take, but a remarkably consistent theme emerged: the rigid campaign-based model of advertising, perfected over decades of one-way mass media, is headed for extinction....


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Leonie vander Westhuizen's curator insight, February 17, 2013 1:22 AM

I like the example of Audi, Coca Cola and Oreo that shows how advertising differs. In teaching PR it is important for students to know that the way you as PRO work is challenging

Casey Strachan's curator insight, February 17, 2013 1:59 PM

In case you are still thinking otherwise, the rigid campaign-based model of advertising, in one-way mass media, is headed for extinction....

Jeff Domansky's comment, February 17, 2013 3:27 PM
Appreciate the comments Leonie and Casey. Agree it is critical to stay ahead of this disruption!
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Beervana: The Bold New World of 2014 Looks Unsettlingly Like 1978

Beervana: The Bold New World of 2014 Looks Unsettlingly Like 1978 | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

...Stone's corporate identity has always threatened to bleed over the thin line separating satire and self-importance, so maybe it's not the best example of craft beer's direction.  TheAtlantic piece drives the point home more pointedly: "So is this the future of U.S. beer consumption – a country that stumbles over itself to buy beer made with wild-carrot seed, bee balm, chanterelle mushrooms , and aged in whiskey barrels?"

 

It got me thinking.  If the craft beer market has become a contest over the most outrageous, has craft beer finally grown up and become its nemesis, mass market beer?  Allow me to demonstrate....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 12, 10:12 AM

Ponder this: Has craft beer marketing gone too far?

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Lisa Fulmer: The value of the marketing funnel

Lisa Fulmer: The value of the marketing funnel | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

The "marketing funnel" concept has been around for over 100 years. It's about the journey a typical customer takes to buy a product or service.

 

The marketing funnel has many versions, but this is the jist of it. The funnel shape represents the number of people at each stage of the journey. Lots of people to reach out to at the top, and their numbers naturally dwindle as some people continue toward a purchase...


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 9, 10:06 AM

Well said by Lisa Fulmer.

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Brand loyalty programs: Are they effective ?

Brand loyalty programs: Are they effective ? | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

According to the research survey, 62% of U.S. consumers join retail brand loyalty programs to get discounts but only 36% have received a reward or promotion from the program that actually made them come back to the brand. One reason might be the fact that, according to the survey results, 81% of brand loyalty program members don’t understand the benefits they’re supposed to get from the program or how the program works at all.

 

Brand loyalty programs can provide a lot of benefits to marketers but the more the program is customized for each customers needs the better chance of success.Loyalty is different for each customer. The key is to provide enough loyalty experiences that your best customers are appreciated. As we all know, the 80-20 rule holds true for most retail and restaurant businesses. Find those 20% and figure out what makes them loyal, get to know them. Acknowledge different customers by basing your loyalty program on services that you provide each time they visit. Give your customers something to work towards by offering a tiered program where the best customers receive more points per purchase in appreciation for their long-time support of your business....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 23, 2013 10:54 AM

Research shows brand loyalty programs can still be effective is there well managed. Here's how.

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How the NY Times created multimedia story The Jockey | Media news | Journalism.co.uk

How the NY Times created multimedia story The Jockey | Media news | Journalism.co.uk | Communication & PR | Scoop.it

We speak to two of the people involved in creating the news outlet's latest Snowfall-like immersive multimedia project....

 

Last week The New York Times website published a story called The Jockey, followed by publication in the sports section of the print edition on Sunday.

 

The Jockey is the latest immersive or multimedia reading experience created by the news outlet that brought us Snow Fall. The Jockey tells the story of Russell Baze, the first North American jockey to ride in 50,000 races, and does so through long-form text, video and moving graphics.This immersive story has a sponsor. Some have interpreted this as native advertising or sponsored content, and AdAge writes that these custom ad units are "designed to better fit the new environment" than the advertising within Snow Fall...-


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 25, 2013 4:45 PM

This is an interesting look at journalism, Transmedia storytelling and how native advertising or brand journalism is creeping into even the most traditional media outlets. At the very least, it's a great read and a story well told.

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Influencer Outreach Best Practices: Preparing a Strategic Plan

Influencer Outreach Best Practices: Preparing a Strategic Plan | Communication & PR | Scoop.it
Influencer outreach campaigns are often run as part of a broader marketing plan, integrated with a variety of other media and public relations tactics in order to extend reach.

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Janine Lloyd's insight:

Great practical advise when developing an influencer plan ...

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Ron Sela's curator insight, July 17, 2013 7:34 AM

Influencer Outreach Best Practices: Preparing a Strategic Plan

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Robert Munsch's Storytelling Lessons for Content Marketers

Robert Munsch's Storytelling Lessons for Content Marketers | Communication & PR | Scoop.it
Content marketers can learn about audience building & engagement from renowned author Robert Munsch. Improve your strategy with tips from a storytelling master!

Via Karen Dietz, Pedro Barbosa, Jeff Domansky
Janine Lloyd's insight:

A must read about storytelling for Content Marketers

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 4, 2013 4:48 PM

Pedro Barbosa and Karen Dietz shares storytelling insight sparked by the inspiration of children's writer Robert Munsch.

Laurence Roelants's curator insight, February 5, 2013 2:47 AM

Magnifique leçon qui nécessite une évolution des mentalités des marketers traditionnels: offrir de la valeur avant de penser à vendre quoi que ce soit ....et garder l'enthousiasme intact!

Two Pens's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:00 PM

Munsch immersed himself in the world of his industry and audience. It takes more effort to do it but pays off in the long term because you understand the context and what people are interested in better.