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Rescooped by Carla Hopkins from The Daily Leadership Scoop
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11 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader

11 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader | Communication | Scoop.it
Being likeable will help you in your job, business, relationships, and life. I interviewed dozens of successful business leaders in my last book, Likeable Business, to determine what made them so

Via Bobby Dillard
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FRANK FEATHER ~ Business Futurist's curator insight, December 30, 2013 7:26 PM

Be a Better Leader: 11 Simple Concepts

Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, December 30, 2013 11:54 PM

The core value of a transleader.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 31, 2013 1:42 PM

Great structure.  Simple in nature but hard to execute in a genuine way every time.  Worth looking to by all leaders.

Rescooped by Carla Hopkins from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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A Very Simple Way to Hear the Best Stories

A Very Simple Way to Hear the Best Stories | Communication | Scoop.it
Everyday your team is doing great work.  Sometimes you miss their stories.   Some folks will go home and tell their stories around the dinner table.  Others can't, or won't.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 10, 2013 7:57 PM

Now after all the heavy lifting of responding to John Hagel's blog post on storytelling (see the last 4 posts on 10/9 and 10/10) here's a great article on the simplest way to listen to and find great stories in your business or organization.


Easy peasy! Enjoy --


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What Are Success Stories Really Good For?

What Are Success Stories Really Good For? | Communication | Scoop.it
Some cultural critics believe business war stories aren't instructive. What can we learn from that?

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 17, 2013 12:06 PM

The author here, Drake Baer, is questioning the value of business success stories -- in particular, memoirs of successful Titans about how they became, well, successful.


The main point is that life is complex and these kinds of memoirs are  probably not helpful because life is too complex. So these stories lead us down a primrose path that ultimately is not hepful. What is helpful though is practice. In other words, if you want to be a high jumper, keep jumping higher.


Yet there are important principles about stories to tease out here. 


Life IS complex. Yet stories -- of both successes and failures -- help us figure out our way through. Why? Because stories of successes and failures contain within them problem-solving structures. They help us figure out how to solve the problems we face in our own lives and careers. Different stories from different people contain different and similar problem-solving structures. This is a good thing. So listening to/reading these kinds of stories can actually be very helpful.


On the other hand, I also believe that a diet exclusively of success stories can be problematic. Which is why I also added stories of failures into the mix. Because failure stories are really all about how we recovered from mistakes we've made -- and what we've learned along the way. Customers and employees want to know these kinds of stories. And they too build trust.


The notion of practice is an interesting one. I can practice 'work' or 'career' all I want but in the end, if I don't have guidance in some form, success is harder to figure out and takes longer to show up. So instead of discounting failure and success stories, I think I would want to listen to and read lots of them. So maybe success is less about practice and more about persistence.


Plus, both success and failure stories give us hope. I always remember the story about Rowland Hussey Macy, Sr. who founded Macy's department story -- and failed 4 times before succeeding. This gives me hope to keep trying :)


I do agree with the notion of practice -- especially if you want to become a better storyteller. That's the main pathway to improvement: learn how to tell a great story and then practice practice practice :)


OK -- enough pontificating for the day :) Go read the article for yourself and let me know if you agree or disagree!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Just Story It - Scoops

Just Story It - Scoops | Communication | Scoop.it

Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business.

I've chosen them because they actually make a contribution to our knowledge and wisdom about stories, show us how to apply stories to growing our businesses, or give valuable how-to tips.

 

I weed out all the junk. And besides, who needs another post in why storytelling is important?? Where's the beef?? We want the meat!

 

I've written reviews of each article to share what I like best, what you can get from reading the article, or what may be missing in the article.

 

How To Find A Topic: Click on the Filter tab above, and type in a keyword. All the articles with that keyword will appear.

 

I may occassionally review an article that I think is problematic as a way to educate us all, although most I will simply pass over.  If you wonder if I've seen an article that is not included here, send me a message and I'll respond.

After doing biz story work for over a decade (and with a PhD in Folklore) I hope you find many great insights and tips here. Many thanks for visiting and enjoy the articles!

 

And I hope you will also visit my website for more tips and tools, & take the free Story IQ assessment so you can see how well developed your storytelling skills and knowledge is: http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=storytelling-skills-ni-part- 

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 13, 2013 12:03 PM
Thank you!
Karen Dietz's comment, August 14, 2013 5:18 PM
Hey Bart! Thanks for letting me know about the broken link. I'll let the tech folks at Scoop.it know. In the meantime, here's the correct link: www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it
ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 7, 2013 8:15 AM

Karen is dedicated to the art of Storytelling as a key tool in running a business or any other type of endeavor.  Here at ManufacturingStories.com we fully support this art form as the best way to generate positive and effective change.  Thanks Karen for all of your dedicated and tireless work! It's a tood Story!!

Rescooped by Carla Hopkins from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Truth About Story: Ashraf Ramsey's Response to John Hagel

The Truth About Story: Ashraf Ramsey's Response to John Hagel | Communication | Scoop.it

There is no link in the title above. Ashraf Ramsey is a story work professional based in the Netherlands. I've known Ashraf for years and he is another great thinker about the work of stories in business. His company is Narrativity Group and he comments here on John Hagel's latest blog post about distinctions between story and narrative.


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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 10, 2013 6:15 PM

Like most others who have been working in the story field for decades, Ashraf's reaction to John Hagel's recent blog post is not favorable. Because of his work schedule Ashraf asked me to post his comments. Thank you Ashraf for weighing in! Here are his thoughts:


From Ashraf Ramsey:

In his blog titled the ‘The Untapped Potential of Corporate Narratives’  John Hagel makes a great number of very disturbing mistakes as he jumps on the bandwagon of Storytelling on the one hand, yet completely misses the point on the other.

 

Let me first, to the best of my ability summarize and parafrase his points:

-        There is a missed opportunity to harness the much greater power narratives, especially for institutions

He argument is based on his distinction between stories and narratives.: “First, stories are self-contained – they have a beginning, a middle and an end. Narratives on the other hand are open-ended – the outcome is unresolved, yet to be determined.  Second, stories are about me, the story-teller, or other people; they are not about you.  In contrast, the resolution of narratives depends on the choice you make and the actions you take – you will determine the outcome. Everyone is captivated by the emotional power and engagement of stories and it’s true, they have enormous power.  But to understand the much greater power of narrative, I point out that throughout history, millions of people have given their lives for narratives.  Every successful social movement in history has been driven at its core by a narrative that drove people to do amazing things, whether it’s the Christian narrative, the American narrative or the Marxist narrative. Narratives have an extraordinary power of pull.”

 

Well, that’s where he goes wrong.


First of all, yes we need to make a distinction. But the distinction is between the Story and the Telling.


Where story on the one hand is both a cogntive construct and cognitive constructiomn: an organizing principle that transforms information into meaning. And where the telling on the other hand is the vast array of means, methods and media  -- we have to convey the story. The words on the page, the images on the screen, the pigments on the canvas are not the story –they are the carriers of the story. Story is a cognitive construct with its own laws and logic and is as such immaterial.


Telling is a communicative and expressive construct, and is by its own nature also governed by laws and logic. In the history of Narratology from Aristotle to Greimas distinctions have been made between story and plot. Between story and discourse. Between histoire and discours. Between fabula and sjuzet (the chronological order of the retold events).


But nowhere in the history of Narratology does the distinction between story and narrative as defined by Mr. Hagel exist.

On the contrary, what he defines as Narrative is in fact Mythology. The late late and renowned literary critic Norhrop Frye in Spiritus Mundi [1976: page 19] has deep insights and great wisdom to offer beyond the jump on the bandwagon soundbites mr Hagel hurls at us.


Thus mythology simultaneously functions as a deep structure of perception and as an overarching mode of understanding. As Northrop Frye puts it:

Man lives, not directly or nakedly in nature like the animals, but within a mythological universe, a body of assumptions and beliefs developed from his existential concerns. Most of this is held unconsciously, which means that our imagination may recognize elements of it, when presented in art or literature, without consciously understanding what it is that we recognize.” 

 

Now that we have cleared that up we can move on and adress Mr Hagels’ notions of the application of Narrative – read Mythology in the world of business where I have been applying narratology for almost 3 decades.


What he calls Narrative here is in fact a merger of a Corporate Story – which is a vision on the meaning and purpose of the identity and existence of an organization – and a brand story which is the source and the frame that drives and contains all marketing and corporate communications as instrument of perception management.


And he gets is wrong when he says ‘unpack the slogan’. No it is the other way round. In the proces of Story development, we carve out what is meaningful and relevant and craft it into a coherent and compelling story. We then condense the story further and further and destill from it its quintessence. And that is how great taglines are born.

 

And as Mr Hagel goes on praising the virtues of Narrative I can’t help but read over and over again how in the past decade Storytelling has been sold and made relevant.


So, my conclusion is that Mr Hagel sees advantages in storytelling. But he rightly does not want to  be associated with touchy feely white fluffy bunny types storytelling is associated with. And so he constructs a new term with total disregards for the 2000+ years of acadamic literature on the subject.

 

Me thinketh he is a Narrative in his own mind.


This review was written by Ashraf Ramsey for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Carla Hopkins from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Learn StoryTelling -- FREE online class!

Learn StoryTelling -- FREE online class! | Communication | Scoop.it
How do you tell a story? Learn to listen and inspire. Understand trends in current fiction and learn to contextualize narratives in this MOOC. Enrol for free!

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 15, 2013 11:35 AM

Hey folks -- here is an intensive and FREE online course that really digs into crafting stories. And it is an interdisciplinary course that also covers new technologies and transmedia storytelling. Yippee!!


The course is several weeks long and is participatory. The course description says you even get to practice your stories. Click through to read the extensive description, requirements, etc. It looks like a real winner.


The only caution is that it is being billed as crafting fictional stories -- and we all know business stories are all about sharing authentic personal experiences. So keep this in mind.


Still in all -- it sounds like a fab course. I have had a number of people ask me lately where they can go to learn storytelling. Here is your answer.


If anyone takes the course, let us know if it was a good experience or not!


Many thanks to fellow curator  for recommending this article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Carla Hopkins from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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7 Content Marketing Tips to Grab Your Audience's Attention: Story Stuff

7 Content Marketing Tips to Grab Your Audience's Attention: Story Stuff | Communication | Scoop.it
Content marketing is hard. Here are 7 content marketing tips and resources that will get you so much more with much less. It’s about working smarter, not harder.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 18, 2013 10:19 AM

From Pratik Dholakiya, a guest author for Copyblogger, comes a great article on how to capture someone's attention for gaining readeres, customers and fans.


Many of the 7 tips connect with storytelling. In fact tip #2 is: tell stories!


Tip #1 is about headlines. I just wrote an article about how to title stories to entice people to read. Especially when shared digitally. As Bullas says, if the headline doesn't grab them they won't read your material. So headlines are critically important if you want folks to read your stories.


Tip #5 is all about being conversational. And that is critically important in your storytelling. No one likes reading material when you sound like a stuffed shirt :))


Tip #6 focuses on making your audience look good. When we think about this in story terms, it's making sure your customer is the hero of the story, not you.


All of the tips are solid. And there are quite a lot of good points here. So enjoy the discussion and the gems shared.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Carla Hopkins from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | Communication | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:50 PM

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).


He does a good job in laying that foundation.


I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:


1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.


2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.


Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 


Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"