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Communicating Science Clearly
Thinking about audience, context, and purpose
Curated by Marybeth Shea
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Environmental scientists answer your questions · Sense about Science

Environmental scientists answer your questions · Sense about Science | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Sense about Science ? Equipping people to make sense of science and evidence (How does farming affect the environment?

Via Luigi Guarino
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Biologist Dr. Barry Commoner, 95, died Sunday | The Guardian Express

Biologist Dr. Barry Commoner, 95, died Sunday | The Guardian Express | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
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Blinded by Big Science: The lesson I learned from ENCODE is that projects like ENCODE are not a good idea

Blinded by Big Science: The lesson I learned from ENCODE is that projects like ENCODE are not a good idea | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

The lesson I learned from ENCODE is that projects like ENCODE are not a good idea.

American biology research achieved greatness because we encouraged individual scientists to pursue the questions that intrigued them and the NIH, NSF and other agencies gave them the resources to do so. And ENCODE and projects like it are, ostensibly at least, meant to continue this tradition, empowering individual scientists by producing datasets of “higher quality and greater comprehensiveness than would otherwise emerge from the combined output of individual research projects”.

But I think it is now clear that big biology is not a boon for individual discovery-driven science. Ironically, and tragically, it is emerging as the greatest threat to its continued existence.

The most obvious conflict between little science and big science is money. In an era when grant funding is getting scarcer, it’s impossible not to view the $200m spent on ENCODE in terms of the ~125 R01′s it could have funded. It is impossible to score the value lost from these hundred or so unfunded small projects against the benefits of one big one. But a awful lot of amazing science comes out of R01′s ...


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Citizen science goes 'extreme'

Citizen science goes 'extreme' | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Researchers push for wider use of community-generated data in science and policy-making.
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It is time for full disclosure of author contributions

It is time for full disclosure of author contributions | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Online databases could increase fairness and transparency by fully documenting the role of each contributor to a paper, says Sebastian Frische.
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[1209.0781] World citation and collaboration networks: uncovering the role of geography in science

Abstract here. See adjacent Wired Science piece for more description.

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Bandwidth and Open Access in Developing Countries | EvoEcoLab, Scientific American Blog Network

Bandwidth and Open Access in Developing Countries | EvoEcoLab, Scientific American Blog Network | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

One of the creeds of the open access movement is that free access to literature aides the transfer of knowledge from wealthier, better funded nations to researchers in developing nations. There is little to no doubt that increased access to research results has beneficial reverberations in several directions – but like many hypothetical benefits, they only work well if those on the receiving end can efficiently reap those benefits.

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Fox News Distorts Climate Science; in Other News, the Pope Is Catholic | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

Fox News Distorts Climate Science; in Other News, the Pope Is Catholic | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
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Annals of Improbable Research Goes Open-Access | Wired Science | Wired.com

Annals of Improbable Research Goes Open-Access | Wired Science | Wired.com | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

Another open access journal:  this one, charming and fun, a totally pin-up "girl" for science cool.

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Soapbox Science: Test, learn, adapt – a scientific approach to public policy : Soapbox Science

Soapbox Science: Test, learn, adapt – a scientific approach to public policy : Soapbox Science | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Dr. Prateek Buch is a research scientist and public engagement professional working to involve patients and the public in a world-leading research programme to develop gene and cell therapies for vision loss.
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Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Every day there are news reports of new health advice, but how can you know if they're right?
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Whither Science Publishing? | The Scientist

Whither Science Publishing? | The Scientist | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

Today, researchers stand on the brink of a new age in scholarly publishing. Never before has science been so inundated with new findings, or have technical advances generated such mountains of data. Innovations sprout from labs the world over as humanity’s understanding of our universe grows. But that growth is only as robust as the system used to share disparate bits of knowledge, test and challenge reported advances, and remotely collaborate in scientific efforts. To keep up with the blistering pace of scientific and technological advances, publishers are getting creative. In recent years, new concepts such as post-publication peer review, all-scientist editorial teams, lifetime publishing privilege fees, and funder-supported open access have entered the publishing consciousness.

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Mountains of Data by R. Service for Science Mag

After dozens of Himalayan journeys, David Breashears began to notice that the glaciers were in rapid retreat. In 2007, Breashears formed GlacierWorks, a company that's creating an interactive Web site to allow viewers to navigate Himalayan landscapes constructed from terabytes of high-resolution images. Breashears and his GlacierWorks colleagues are now working with computer scientists and image experts at Microsoft Research to augment the images with numerous other layers of scientific data and models. Viewers will be able to peruse vistas from photos taken at eye level and learn about hydrology and how glaciers accumulate, lose ice, and flow down mountainsides. They'll also be able to manipulate climate models to see the effects on glacial melting and river flows in decades to come.

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The Patient Paradox

The Patient Paradox | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

Very helpful for clinicians and biomedical researchers.

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Algorithms - Leave the thinking to us. A sociologists view. Times Higher Ed

Put starkly, the day cannot be far away when there is an "app" that tells us what articles to read. I'm imagining a simple application that builds up a personalised profile of the research articles we read, and then uses that profile to predict what we are likely to want to read. Such devices are already informing us what music to listen to, what films to watch and what books to buy, so it can't be long before they are doing our research for us, too.

Imagine the ease of researching in a world where the research materials "find" us. Where we need only log in to see what we must read in order to complete a project. No more searching, no more wasting time reading the wrong things or looking in the wrong places, no more aimless flâneurs wandering around libraries or flicking through e-journals to see what they might find. None of this will be needed because the power of algorithms, as sociologist Scott Lash has put it, will be reshaping the academy. These algorithms will streamline, predict, make decisions for us and do work on our behalf, taking some of the agency from researchers and research processes - and making it their own.

This might sound like futurism, but the reality is that algorithms are already sorting the academy in lots of ways.

I've been quite speculative in suggesting that research articles will come to find their readers, but in many ways this is already the case with books. We need only to think of how Amazon's predictive algorithms already shape our encounters with academic books..."


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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The interactome

How do you get the most out of meeting people at science conferences?


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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IvanOresnik's comment, November 28, 2012 7:37 AM
Really enjoyed this article!
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Nature News Blog: Record number of journals banned for boosting impact factor with self-citations : Nature News Blog

Nature News Blog: Record number of journals banned for boosting impact factor with self-citations : Nature News Blog | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
More research journals than ever are boosting their impact factors by self-citation.  Read more...
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Introducing "The Half-Life of Facts" | Wired Science | Wired.com

Introducing "The Half-Life of Facts" | Wired Science | Wired.com | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
My book The Half-Life of Facts, about the science behind how knowledge changes, is coming out next week and I am very excited about it!
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Geography and the Scientific Endeavor | Wired Science | Wired.com

Geography and the Scientific Endeavor | Wired Science | Wired.com | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Scientists do not operate in a vacuum, and neither do they operate independent of where they are.
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Music from real hot chili peppers

Music from real hot chili peppers | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Art meets science in a musical project that turns the growth of plants into sound.

 

Sometimes charm is a way to communicate about science.

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Retraction record rocks community

Retraction record rocks community | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Anaesthesiology tries to move on after fraud investigations.
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The first steps towards a modern system of scientific publication « Genomes Unzipped

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David McCandless: The beauty of data visualization | Video on TED.com

TED Talks David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections.
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Methagora: Referee Accreditation : Methagora

Methagora: Referee Accreditation : Methagora | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Peer review is central to scientific research and we highly value the time and effort our referees devote to it.
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Mindtoch's top 25 technical communication blogs

hosted by the Society for Technical Communication

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