Communicating Science Clearly
556 views | +0 today
Follow
Communicating Science Clearly
Thinking about audience, context, and purpose
Curated by Marybeth Shea
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Sperm Trajectories, Evolving Humans and a Tomato Tapestry: The Best Scientific Figures of 2012 | Wired Science | Wired.com

Sperm Trajectories, Evolving Humans and a Tomato Tapestry: The Best Scientific Figures of 2012 | Wired Science | Wired.com | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Figures contained in scientific reports are a neglected area of the design world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

The life of a Nature paper

From submission to citation, see a manuscript pass through Nature's editorial process. For information on submitting a paper to Nature, go to http://www.natu...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Let's Tame Software Patent Claims: Lessons From Bioinformatics | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Let's Tame Software Patent Claims: Lessons From Bioinformatics | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

Definitions matter!

 

In biopharmaceuticals, an application fails the written description requirement if its disclosure provides insufficient physical structure for its claims. So inventors can’t typically claim solely by function; for example, they can’t claim a method for chemically inducing a particular effect unless they reveal at least one or more actual chemical formulae. As for definiteness, an application fails that requirement if its claim language doesn’t clearly delineate the inventive territory at issue.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Scoop.it!

NextGen Science essay survey: Using science to address your county's problems

NextGen Science essay survey: Using science to address your county's problems | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

Young scientists!

"You've just been elected to your nation's highest office! In your inaugural address, announce the biggest challenge facing your country today and how you will use science to address it."

Submit your essay by 16 November for a chance to be featured in Science -


Via Mary Williams
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Visual Communication for Scientists
Scoop.it!

Storytelling with Big Data: Thoughts on VISUALIZED | @ScientificAmerican, Scientific American Blog Network

Storytelling with Big Data: Thoughts on VISUALIZED | @ScientificAmerican, Scientific American Blog Network | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
As an attendee at the inaugural VISUALIZED conference last week in New York City, I was ready to experience, as the website described,...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Be persuasive. Be brave. Be arrested (if necessary)

Be persuasive. Be brave. Be arrested (if necessary) | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
A resource crisis exacerbated by global warming is looming, argues financier Jeremy Grantham. More scientists must speak out.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Twitter Is A 24-Hour Party. You Can Tweet If You Want To | Brainwaves, Scientific American Blog Network

Twitter Is A 24-Hour Party. You Can Tweet If You Want To | Brainwaves, Scientific American Blog Network | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
My father called me one night:...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Alternative Research Metrics - Science Careers - Biotech, Pharmaceutical, Faculty, Postdoc jobs on Science Careers

Alternative Research Metrics - Science Careers - Biotech, Pharmaceutical, Faculty, Postdoc jobs on Science Careers | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Researchers are seeking faster, better ways to measure research output and impact.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Speaking Science: Why People Don’t Hear What You Say: Scientific American

Speaking Science: Why People Don’t Hear What You Say: Scientific American | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
A lesson in communication from Scientific American...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Climate science: Trends in use of words in scientific studies may impact public perceptions

The impact of climate science research on society is likely to depend on regular fashion cycles in the public's use of specific keywords relating to climate change, according to new research.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

A Week in Madison, Talking Writing & Science | Wired Science | Wired.com

A Week in Madison, Talking Writing & Science | Wired Science | Wired.com | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
I'm pleased to be going to the land of Deborah Blum, John Hawks, Siri Carpenter, and other illustrious types to spend a week talking with classes and givin...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Limitations to the 'revolutionary' findings of online studies

'Direct to consumer' research, using data obtained through increasingly popular online communities, has methodological limitations that are known to epidemiological studies, including selection bias, information bias, and confounding.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Agricultural Biodiversity
Scoop.it!

Participatory video for ‘vertical communication’ between farmers and policy makers

Participatory video for ‘vertical communication’ between farmers and policy makers | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

The Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC), funded by the CGIAR Challenge Program for Water and Food (CPWF), is currently working with innovation platforms to improve the resilience of rural livel...


Via Luigi Guarino
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Hearing positive verbs can induce unconscious physical response

Hearing a verb related to physical action automatically increases the force with which people grip objects, but has no effect on their physical reaction if the word is presented in the negative form, according to new research.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

John Bohannon: Dance vs. powerpoint, a modest proposal | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Use dancers instead of powerpoint. That's science writer John Bohannon's "modest proposal." In this spellbinding choreographed talk he makes his case by example, aided by dancers from Black Label Movement.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Physicist Elected to Congress Calls for More Scientists-Statesmen: Scientific American

Physicist Elected to Congress Calls for More Scientists-Statesmen: Scientific American | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Bill Foster, member-elect of the U.S.House of Representatives, wants more scientists in Congress who can bring to bear an analytical mind-set to lawmaking...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Scoop.it!

Science News Fumbles via WIRED

Science News Fumbles via WIRED | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

I spent much of the day working on an article about what students can learn from the Seralini GMO-fed rat study. Beyond science, this controversial paper says a lot about the interactions between scientists, journals and the media. Here's an informative article from "The Conversation" that looks at the newsmedia aspect of the controversy : https://theconversation.edu.au/modifying-the-message-how-tricks-masked-home-truths-about-anti-gm-science-9767.

 

You don't have to look far for more examples of poor, erroneous or just mistaken science being heavily promoted to the public through a sometimes over-eager press.... think about XMRV and chronic fatigue syndrome for example, or the "arsenic life" story.

 

I particularly liked this post from WIRED in which Brian Switek talks about how the media blundered in covering a press release on a new theory about how pterosaurs lift off. He concludes by pointing out the deficiencies in the current system through which press release ---> news story, and how science is damaged by inadequacies in much of science journalism. Because much of what the public understands about science is filtered through the media, these organizations and individuals hold a lot of power, and you know what Stan Lee said about that.... (http://marvel.com/images/gallery/issue/38087/images_from_spider-man_with_great_power_comes_great_responsibility_2010_4/image/866272).

 


Via Mary Williams
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Content Collection: Talking to the Public - Science Careers - Biotech, Pharmaceutical, Faculty, Postdoc jobs on Science Careers

Content Collection: Talking to the Public - Science Careers - Biotech, Pharmaceutical, Faculty, Postdoc jobs on Science Careers | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
The benefits of public engagement justify the effort required to develop the necessary skills.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy

Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy encourages scientists to think differently about the use of scientific evidence in policy making.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Overview | Mendeley

Mendeley is a free desktop software which provides reference management tools. It allows users to manage PDFs, generate citations and bibliographies and share research papers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Cultural dimensions of climate change are underestimated, overlooked and misunderstood

Cultural dimensions of climate change are underestimated, overlooked and misunderstood | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
The impact of climate change on many aspects of cultural life for people all over the world is not being sufficiently accounted for by scientists and policy-makers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Does Chinese chocolate taste better than Swiss? Depends on when you find out

Does Chinese chocolate taste better than Swiss? Depends on when you find out | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
When consumers taste a chocolate bar they think is made in Switzerland, they'll prefer it over one supposedly made in China, according to new study.

 

Word choice shapes perception.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Declining influence of high impact factor journals documented

The most prestigious peer-reviewed journals in the world, such as Cell, Nature, Science, and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), have less and less influence amongst scientists, according to a new article.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Flaws in popular research method exposed

Influential studies into subjects such as the safety and effectiveness of medicines or class size in schools could be called into question by a new report into ways of identifying research bias.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Nature's Bounty
Scoop.it!

The art of sustainable development

Einstein said that we can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking used when we created them. Wise words, except few people heed them when it comes to sustainable solutions for our ailing planet.
more...
No comment yet.