Communicating Science Clearly
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Communicating Science Clearly
Thinking about audience, context, and purpose
Curated by Marybeth Shea
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On the Origin of Science Writers | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine

On the Origin of Science Writers | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
Journalism | Every now and then, I get an email from someone who’s keen to get into science writing and wants to know how I started.
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Blogging your way out of anonymity

Blogging your way out of anonymity | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it


There are some notable exceptions, but most scientists only exploit one way to share their research results: they publish a paper in a scientific journal.


Via Luigi Guarino
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Tomato expert’s field notes go online

Tomato expert’s field notes go online | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
We have blogged before about the C.M. Rick Tomato Genetic Resources Center at UC Davis and their tomato germplasm database. Now, via Dr Roger Chetelat, the director, we hear of a major addition to the data they make available.

Via Luigi Guarino
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Plant Science Papers: Elsevier's Most Downloaded 2011

Plant Science Papers: Elsevier's Most Downloaded 2011 | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it

The top five plant science papers downloaded from Elsevier's journals in 2011:

 

Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant machinery in abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants
Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
Gill, S.S.; Tuteja, N.


2 Protein kinase signaling networks in plant innate immunity
Current Opinion in Plant Biology
Tena, G.; Boudsocq, M.; Sheen, J.

 

3 Regulation of flowering in rice: two florigen genes, a complex gene network, and natural variation
Current Opinion in Plant Biology
Tsuji, H.; Taoka, K.i.; Shimamoto, K.

 

4 Long non-coding RNAs and chromatin regulation
Current Opinion in Plant Biology
De Lucia, F.; Dean, C.

 

5 Epigenetic contribution to stress adaptation in plants
Current Opinion in Plant Biology
Mirouze, M.; Paszkowski, J.

 


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research, Luigi Guarino
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Don't use Scatterplots

Don't use Scatterplots | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
RT @tkb: Good tip - "Don€'t use scatterplots.

Via Luigi Guarino
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Science communication: the use of blogs?

Science communication: the use of blogs? | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
This morning I had an interesting meeting with a colleague to discuss a new module on Science Communication.

Via Luigi Guarino
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Honing skills in scientific writing for publishing

Honing skills in scientific writing for publishing | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
RT @CIMMYT: 15 scientists in #Kenya discover the #secret to writing scientific papers for peer reviewed journals:http://t.co/c78DrQfk #science #workshop...

Via Luigi Guarino
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Unique author identification with ORCHID: Scientists: your number is up

Unique author identification with ORCHID: Scientists: your number is up | Communicating Science Clearly | Scoop.it
ORCID scheme will give researchers unique identifiers to improve tracking of publications.

In 2011, Y. Wang was the world’s most prolific author of scientific publications, with 3,926 to their name — a rate of more than 10 per day. T

 

This confusing problem could be solved following the launch later this year of the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID), an identifier system that will distinguish between authors who share the same name.

Just as barcodes at the supermarket allow the till to distinguish a tomato from a turnip, ORCID aims to reliably attribute research outputs to their true author by assigning every scientist on the planet a machine-readable, 16-digit unique digital identifier. If ORCID takes off, it could revolutionize research management, vastly increase the precision and breadth of scientific metrics and help in developing new analyses of, for example, social networks.


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research, Luigi Guarino
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