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The New Patient Physician Relationship / La Nueva Relación Médico Paciente

The New Patient Physician Relationship / La Nueva Relación Médico Paciente | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

Here I scoop the news coverage and relevant academic output related to new technologies, online social networks and other emerging trends that are changing the patient physician relationship.

 

I'm most interested in the way the information on this issue is presented in media available online and the possible effects of these communications in the perceptions people hold of doctors.

 

When a curated article is cropped, I indicate that there is more text with (...). Bold indicates what is most relevant. My own comments are preceded by "CE".

 

I look forward for your suggestions!

 

------------------

 

En esta página colecciono las noticias y producción académica relevante a las nuevas tecnologías, redes sociales online y otras tendencias emergentes que están cambiando la relación médico paciente.

 

Me interesa la forma en la que se presenta la información sobre este tema en medios de comunicación disponibles en Internet y los posibles efectos que estas comunicaciones tienen en la percepción de las personas respecto a sus doctores.

 

Cuando pongo solo una parte de un artículo, indico que hay más texto con (...). Las negritas indican lo más relevante. Mis comentarios aparecen como CE.

 

¡Espero sus sugerencias!

 

 


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Access to digital health communications can be an issue for lower income patients

Access to digital health communications can be an issue for lower income patients | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

Many lower-income patients say they would like to communicate electronically with their health care providers but are unable to do so because of insufficient technology at the clinics where they receive care, according to a new study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Medical News Today reports.

 

Study Details

 

For the study, researchers from the University of California-San Francisco surveyed 416 patients at six San Francisco Department of Public Health community clinics that primarily serve uninsured or publically insured individuals.

 

The study participants: 

Were ethnically and racially diverse;Spoke 24 different primary languages; andWere representative of the overall clinic population (Medical News Today, 2/27).

Study Findings

 

The study found that:

78% of the study participants expressed interest in electronic communication with their health care providers (Martinez, "On Central," KPCC, 2/27);60% said they use email;54% said they obtain information from the Internet; and17% said they already use email to communicate informally with their health care providers.

According to the researchers, many safety-net clinics do not offer the patient portals or secure messaging systems necessary to support electronic communication with doctors.

 



Read more: http://www.ihealthbeat.org/articles/2013/2/27/lowincome-patients-interested-in-digital-health-communication.aspx#ixzz2MZg2DE1x


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Everett Hudson's comment, March 4, 2013 10:18 AM
This rings truth as many low income families will be receiving end of poor technology.
Isabel Cruz's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:07 PM

Importante

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Power of telemedicine and the patient’s health

With the ever-changing world of health and technology new terms are almost always being discussed from ehealth to mhealth and telemedicine. Often times the patient might feel overwhelmed or confused...

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MDConnect ME keeps doctors, patients and families connected during and after procedures

MDConnect ME keeps doctors, patients and families connected during and after procedures | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

How MDConnectME (@MDConnectME) works:

 

* The doctor sends an invite to the patient.

* The patient signs up for the mobile application and sends a list of family and friends to be notified.

* Surgeons and/or other members of the care team send immediate alerts updating the patients' procedure, condition and recovery.

 

MDConnect ME is free for patients.

 


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VOLI AEREI: LE LINEE GUIDA UE PER I VIAGGIATORI DISABILI

VOLI AEREI: LE LINEE GUIDA UE PER I VIAGGIATORI DISABILI | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
La Comunità Europea ha recentemente emesso un comunicato in cui ribadisce alcune linee guida utili alla corretta applicazione dei diritti delle persone disabili o con mobilità ridotta che viaggiano in aereo...

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Are Patient Communities an Effective Way to Deliver Care?

Are Patient Communities an Effective Way to Deliver Care? | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
Are Patient Communities an Effective Way to Deliver Care? That was the question debated at the 2012 Connected Health Symposium on October 25.  Two physicians, Dr. Andrew Watson, Surgeon and Medical...

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Doctors Are Making Intelligent Use of Social Media

Doctors Are Making Intelligent Use of Social Media | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
Ever Increasingly, Physicians are venturing into the digital world. Many of them are apprehensive of tools like Facebook and the issues they create. But that

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Health games at work

Health games at work | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
Fran Melmed (@femelmed) writes:

In the past year, and much to my surprise, I’ve become a game developer.

My game, Hotseat, uses smartphones to get us up out of our seats throughout the day to reduce the health risks associated with prolonged sitting, or “sitting disease”—which include obesity, of course, but also kidney disease, heart disease, cancer and even earlier mortality. Hotseat lets users choose activities they wish to do and then books a rotating schedule of 2-minute breaks into their day, based on their calendar availability. Hotseat also allows users to engage in competitive and collaborative challenges.

Having created a game, I can tell you it’s no small undertaking to design something that adheres to the principles that make a game a game and that delivers the desired engagement, learning and emotional satisfaction that games do.
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Sven Awege's curator insight, December 18, 2012 5:54 AM

Games are certainly a way to foster early engagement. Over time that enthusiasm will wane, and a more comprehensive integration of real world people will be needed to foster compliance.

People are important - technology has to make it seamless and fun. Technology on its own will not cut the long-haul.

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Only 16% of hospitals actively use social media

Only 16% of hospitals actively use social media | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
"A hospital without an engaging social media presence soon may be viewed with the same suspicion as a business that has no website," according to the Healthcare Association of New York State, the Times Union reported. According to a white paper from the association, 81 percent of consumers say if a hospital has a strong social media presence, it is likely to be more cutting edge.

The association white paper falls in line with other research from Pew Research Center, which in July found that about 60 percent of adults use the Internet to make healthcare decisions.

Even more, PwC in April found that more than two-fifths of individuals said social media affected their choice of a provider or healthcare organization.

Despite those numbers, many hospitals are still behind on the social media trend. Only 16 percent of hospitals are actively using social media, according to the Times Union.

"From a business perspective, (hospitals) are missing a great opportunity to find people who would like to use them when they need them," Andrea J. Simon, an anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants based in Westchester County, told the newspaper.

Most of the hesitation surrounding social media involves possible negative reviews that might hurt their reputation.

"It's losing control, especially in administration, where we want to control our message," said Darlene Olivieri Raynsford, director of communications for Glens Falls Hospital, whose policy is to reach out to the negative commenter and talk to him or her offline.

In another example of how to handle negative comments, when a patient at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals' Headache Center complained on Twitter about a long wait, Jefferson Director of Social Media Josh Goldstein immediately texted the interactive marketing team to go the waiting room and find the patient. It turned out the patient had never signed in at the computer kiosk, and the matter was resolved in a matter of minutes.

But hospitals shouldn't be as concerned about patients on social media as their own employees, according to Kim Fox, a vice president at healthcare marketing firm Jarrard Phillips Cate & Hancock based in Nashville,Tenn.

"We spend a lot of time worrying about what our customers might say on social media, but our employees' comments can be far more damaging," Fox said in a blog postlast month about employees who might use Facebook or Twitter to complain publicly.
Read more: Only 16% of hospitals actively use social media - FierceHealthcare http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/story/only-16-hospitals-actively-use-social-media/2012-11-26#ixzz2E01yx9CK
Subscribe: http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/signup?sourceform=Viral-Tynt-FierceHealthcare-FierceHealthcare

 


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One in three US adults will buy a digital health product in 2013

One in three US adults will buy a digital health product in 2013 | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

One out of every three adults in the US will buy a digital health product of some kind in the next year, Gary Shapiro, the CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), said — citing data from an upcoming CEA survey — during his luncheon keynote at HIMSS’ mHealth Summit this week.

 

Over the course of this past year the consumer/patient-facing digital health conversation shifted from a predominantly direct-to-consumer market to one that might leverage traditional healthcare channels. Among the drivers that steered the industry back toward the patient-provider relationship: the prospect of physicians prescribing apps, the importance of integrating data from mobile health programs with EHRs and other systems, and the push for patient engagement from forthcoming meaningful use requirements.

 

Health apps and smartphone-enabled medical devices today, which Vinod Khosla (Khosla Ventures) described as “clumsy point solutions”, are just version 1.0 of digital health, he said. This is just the beginning and some of the consumer-driven services today will quickly make their way into the healthcare system.

 

Consumer health and provider-driven digital health initiatives, of course, will grow up together in parallel. Each can help drive the other in their own way.

 

“There are really two models for how the world works: the cathedral and the bazaar model,” Khosla explained. “Bazaars evolve much faster than cathedrals do — often because people leave cathedrals to join the bazaar. You can also be in a cathedral and help the bazaar evolve faster than any cathedral could on its own.”


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Teenage Gamers Better At Simulated Surgery Than Medical Residents | TechCrunch

Teenage Gamers Better At Simulated Surgery Than Medical Residents | TechCrunch | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
Forget AP Biology and Latin class: get those pre-meds hooked on Call of Duty. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that teenage video gamers were better at simulated surgery than medical residents.

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"If we are serious about 'engaging with the patient' then we have to make it easy for them to tell us"

"If we are serious about 'engaging with the patient' then we have to make it easy for them to tell us" | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

Roy Lilley (@RoyLilley) writes:

 

Some organisations think a Twitter account is a management bugle, an extension of the house news-letter or an advert in a magazine. It's not. Corporate Twitter (and I include the NHS) can be a notice board but more, it is about opening up a channel to listen. 

 

How about the NHS? Sort out your organisation's #hashtag and put it on the wall in the lavatories and say; 'If this place is clean, Tweet it. If it's not Twitter about it, here's our #hashtag. If the practice waiting room isn't up to much, if the receptionist was fabulous or off-hand, if the doc' was happy or humpy, #hashtag. If the experience on the ward wasn't right Tweet it at #hashtag. If it was great; #hashtag.

 

Yes, yes, I know; not everyone has a smartphone. But a lot of people do and there are 10m Twitter users in the UK. Nursing has a huge community of users. There is seldom a silver bullet to fix problems but this can be part of a silver buckshot solution to real time knowledge of what the punters see, experience and think.

 

The trick to making this work is for the most senior people in the organisation to monitor their #hashtag. They don't have to reply, that's the job of the organisation's fixer (Every place should have one). But it is the job of the organisation's bosses to be across what is happening and they can be - in real time. A couple of complaints about the same smelly bog warrants a personal visit. A Twitter pic of an inedible meal deserves a personal look. A compliment deserves a pat on the back.

 

If we really are serious about 'engaging with the patient' (which, in English, means listening to the customers who, through their taxes pay for all this) then we really have to make it easy for them to tell us.


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Access to digital health communications can be an issue for lower income patients

Access to digital health communications can be an issue for lower income patients | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

Many lower-income patients say they would like to communicate electronically with their health care providers but are unable to do so because of insufficient technology at the clinics where they receive care, according to a new study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Medical News Today reports.

 

Study Details

 

For the study, researchers from the University of California-San Francisco surveyed 416 patients at six San Francisco Department of Public Health community clinics that primarily serve uninsured or publically insured individuals.

 

The study participants: 

Were ethnically and racially diverse;Spoke 24 different primary languages; andWere representative of the overall clinic population (Medical News Today, 2/27).

Study Findings

 

The study found that:

78% of the study participants expressed interest in electronic communication with their health care providers (Martinez, "On Central," KPCC, 2/27);60% said they use email;54% said they obtain information from the Internet; and17% said they already use email to communicate informally with their health care providers.

According to the researchers, many safety-net clinics do not offer the patient portals or secure messaging systems necessary to support electronic communication with doctors.

 



Read more: http://www.ihealthbeat.org/articles/2013/2/27/lowincome-patients-interested-in-digital-health-communication.aspx#ixzz2MZg2DE1x


Via Andrew Spong
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Everett Hudson's comment, March 4, 2013 10:18 AM
This rings truth as many low income families will be receiving end of poor technology.
Isabel Cruz's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:07 PM

Importante

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Facebook, Google and Amazon join fight against cancer - Telegraph

Facebook, Google and Amazon join fight against cancer - Telegraph | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
Facebook, Google and Amazon have teamed up with Cancer Research UK to design a mobile game that will allow members of the public to help the search for new cancer drugs.

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89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient

89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

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Dave Burianek's comment, May 15, 2014 8:45 AM
I think this is interesting.. and as we think about the whole integrated care delivery model, this data and information will play a critical part. Of those practices that Humana will own or be part of in a significant way, I believe we can make this happen. For those docs with small practices, we would need to find the right motivation to have them leverage this info. Do we offer it to them? such as ipads for usage during an office visit? we have to make it simple yet provide the best information so they could provide the best quality of care.
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
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Using Twitter to connect with patients

Using Twitter to connect with patients | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
People are inherently social - in all walks and aspects of our lives.  This includes patients and patient advocates and their participation in healthcare.  Individuals, whether they meet at a confe...

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Partnerships in Clinical Trials: What is an ePatient?

Partnerships in Clinical Trials: What is an ePatient? | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

Craig Lipset, member of the Advisory Board for eClinical Summit, recently sat down to discuss some of the hot topics facing the world of technology and innovation in clinical trials.


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Are Patient Communities an Effective Way to Deliver Care?

Are Patient Communities an Effective Way to Deliver Care? | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
Are Patient Communities an Effective Way to Deliver Care? That was the question debated at the 2012 Connected Health Symposium on October 25.  Two physicians, Dr. Andrew Watson, Surgeon and Medical...

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Quantifying the digital health revolution

A presentation delivered by Stephen Davies at the Fitness Writers' Association in London, UK


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Camilo Erazo's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:35 AM

Doctors will have to deal with a minority of 'super-engaged' patients who attempt to control their bodies through data gathering, analysis and visualization. Are they ready for it?

rob halkes's comment, January 25, 2013 8:39 AM
Personal communication styles have always been around. My hypothesis is that the higher the impact of the health condition and the more vulnerable therapy compliance is (e.g. in (breast) cancer, HIV), the more motivation for patients to tend to issues in coping with their conditions. So, let's not desire to 'connect' all patients, but start to try and learn. Culture and styles of doing care is a learning process..;-)
Rowan Norrie's curator insight, February 16, 2013 5:52 AM

Now is the time of biology, technology and big data! Great overview to show how we are now able to measure billions of datapoints about ourselves, track, analyse and take action accordingly.

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The power of patient-expert books

The power of patient-expert books | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

More and more books are being written by patients -- well-educated, informed patients who manage their illness successfully and have experience, practical knowledge and insights to share with other patients.

 

When it comes to illness-warranted behavior changes, as like seeks like, it's often easier to make changes learned from fellow patients with whom you share the experience of a disease. Like support groups and mentor programs, this is fertile soil for positive behavior change.

 

Patient-authors also narrate the experience of illness. That is why I hope health care professionals (HCPs) are also reading books written by patients.


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Marie Ennis-O'Connor's curator insight, January 8, 2013 12:37 PM

This is a very positive step in the right direction - am excited to see this Andrew 

John Worth's comment, January 11, 2013 11:32 AM
As more patients become activated and engage with their health they become experts. HCPs are going to need to keep up or their science will dilute quicker than you can say 'pass the scalpel'.
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The rise of patient communities on Twitter, visualized (video)

The rise of patient communities on Twitter, visualized (video) | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
A stunning animated visualisation of the growth in the health conversation on the social web among patient communities from Sympur, using its own curated data.

Click on the title link to see the video.
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“Doctors need to listen patients, and patients must be able to articulate their problems”

“Doctors need to listen patients, and patients must be able to articulate their problems” | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

Being literate does not necessarily make you a literate in the area of health, said doctors at a Health Literacy conference at the Nehru centre, Worli on Sunday.

 

“Doctors need to listen patients, and patients must be able to articulate their problems,” said Dr Aniruddha Malpani, founder of Health Education Library for People (HELP) which organised the conference.


The conference called Putting Patients First Through Health Literacy highlighted the fact that being literate and being health literate are two different terms.

 

“Patients are illiterate when it comes to the medical legal documents that are shown to them. There is a need for doctors to have greater interaction with patients about medical diagnosis and the treatment they will be undergoing,” said Prabhakar Rao, a trustee in Jeet Association for Support to Cancer Patients (JASCAP), a cancer help group.

 

“Medical librarians are the link between the doctor and patients,” said Dr Medha Joshi, head of library and information Sciences at Tata Memorial Hospital.

 

“Health literacy is a bridge gap between knowing, learning and being positively aware,” she added.

 

During the conference, the organisors released the book ‘Decoding Medical Gobbledygook – Health Literacy Puts Patients First’ which covers subjects like health literacy, the need for doctor-patient communication, and the contemporary issues in health literacy.


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John Worth's curator insight, December 13, 2012 3:51 AM

In the UK, we understand that a lethal combination is poor literacy + low health literacy + poor social conditions, and that access to health education and skills should be a fundamental right under the NHS. Sadly, despite government policy it is not. 

 

 

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Pharma employee use of social platforms up by 36 percent in 2012

Pharma employee use of social platforms up by 36 percent in 2012 | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it

Cegedim’s annual industry survey, 2012 US Pharma Insights, reveals that while more pharma companies are using social media and mobile platforms to enhance their sales and marketing initiatives, budgets did not reflect an increase in social media spend. Internal alignments are also shifting, with more people citing executive management as the main sponsors of investment in new technology platforms rather than traditional IT departments.

 

Pharma employees have more readily embraced key social media venues in the past year, with 96% of participants present on LinkedIn, 70% on Facebook, and 37% on Twitter, compared to 54%, 32%, and 9% in 2011, respectively. Together, they account for an average 36% increase in use of these platforms. While social media use among survey respondents have shot up, budgets fail to reflect an enthusiasm for such exploits: 29% of companies spent less than 5% of their budgets on social media in 2011 and 50% have spent only that much in 2012; spend in the 5-10% range increased by a mere one percent and declined in the 10% and beyond range by an average of 4.5%. Overall, it means that while more companies are participating in the medium, as companies engage they tend to spend the same or less.

 

Another interesting find in this survey is that companies have undergone a marked shift in priorities. Compared with 29% the previous year, 55% of participants cite strategy/business planning/business development as the primary driver of business model and process change. Marketing/brand teams, commercial operations and regulatory/compliance all saw declines in the neighborhood of 11% in terms of leading the pace of change. This aligns with executive management being seen as the primary driver of technology changes, growing from 28% to 46% in 2011, in contrast to IT’s decline in influence, sliding from 28% to 18%. What is clear here is that the imperative for a more robust technological infrastructure comes from those with the primary role in allocating capital investment and assessing budget spend.


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My 2012 Digital Health Awards: Company, Person, Book Of The Year - Forbes

My 2012 Digital Health Awards: Company, Person, Book Of The Year - Forbes | Communicating Medicine | Scoop.it
My selections for this year’s digital health awards capture important aspects of the evolving landscape, and also highlight where future opportunities for innovation might lie.

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