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WW1 Children's Literature

WW1 Children's Literature | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
I've been sent details of a conference at Dublin next June. The subject is : The First World War in European Children’s Literature: 1970-2014. It will look at the way the War has been represented f...
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Listen to 2,500-year-old music brought back to life

Listen to 2,500-year-old music brought back to life | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Music scholars are recreating ancient Greek songs that haven't been heard for thousands of years. The results aren't very inspiring, but we're finally getting a sense of what the ancients were listening to.
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Energy Box by Pierluigi Bonomo - The Design Ark

Using nearly zero energy, this house designed by Italian architect Pierluigi Bonomo was built in replacement of a heavily damaged building from the 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila, the region of Abruzzo in central italy.
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Mapping the impossible: Matterhorn mapped by a fleet of drones in just under 6 hours

The Matterhorn, which juts out a full kilometre above the surrounding Swiss Alps, dominates the local skyline and has challenged countless mountaineers since it was first scaled in 1865.

 

Now this iconic peak has been mapped in unprecedented detail by a fleet of autonomous, fixed-wing drones, flung into the sky from the summit by their makers. What's more, the entire process took just 6 hours.

 

The mapping, which was unveiled at the Drones and Aerial Robotics Conference in New York City last weekend, was carried out by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) company SenseFly, and aerial photography company Pix4D.

 

Three eBee drones were launched from the top of the mountain, skimming their way down 100 metres from the face, capturing points just 20 centimetres apart. When they reached the bottom, a second team intercepted the drones and relaunched them for further mapping.

 

Speaking to Mapbox, the mapping company that built the 3D point cloud of the mountain when the drones had landed, SenseFly's Adam Klaptocz said: "Such a combination of high altitudes, steep rocky terrain and sheer size of dataset has simply not been done before with drones, we wanted to show that it was possible."

 

A video crew follows senseFly's (http://www.sensefly.com/) team of engineers marking a historic milestone in proof of surveying techniques, using eBee minidrones to map the epic Matterhorn and construct a 3D model of "the most beautiful mountain".

The mission involved the coordination of several teams with multiple eBee drones taking over 2200 images in 11 flights, all within a few hours of a sunny alpine morning. The results are stunning: a high-definition 3D point-cloud made of 300 million points covering an area of over 2800 hectares with an average resolution of 20 cm. A special thanks to our partners Pix4D (http://www.pix4d.com) for the creation of the 3D model, Drone Adventures (http://www.droneadventures.org) for mission coordination and MapBox (http://www.mapbox.com) for online visualisation.

senseFly is a Parrot company (http://parrot.com/)


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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How Two Science Teachers are Implementing Common Core

How Two Science Teachers are Implementing Common Core | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
While math and English language arts teachers have a much more direct call for Common Core implementation, teachers in other content areas are also being called to implement the Common Core State Sta

Via Mel Riddile
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5 iPad Apps to Make You Uber-Productive | Xyo

5 iPad Apps to Make You Uber-Productive | Xyo | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Missing an app that could give your productivity a leg-up? Maybe our list will help you out.
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Great Depression Cooking - Pizza

94 year old cook, author and great grandmother, Clara, recounts her childhood during the Great Depression as she prepares meals from the era. Learn how to ma...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Three biscuit recipes to bring out your inner grandma

Three biscuit recipes to bring out your inner grandma | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Baking is fun and easy - and there's nothing complicated about creating these delicious old-school treats.
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$4.2b fund for Victorian schools at risk as officials fail to agree on reforms

$4.2b fund for Victorian schools at risk as officials fail to agree on reforms | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Victoria and Commonwealth miss third consecutive deadline to reach reform agreement.
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Climate change raising fire risk

Climate change raising fire risk | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Climate change is increasing the probability of extreme bushfire conditions, a report by the nation's leading climate change advisory body has found.
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One Guy With A Marker Just Made The Global Warming Debate Completely Obsolete

One Guy With A Marker Just Made The Global Warming Debate Completely Obsolete | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Doing the math for the human race never seemed easier.
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State's teacher revolution

State's teacher revolution | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
The Victorian government will consider fast-tracking talented professionals into the classroom amid warnings of an oversupply of primary school teachers.
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Kokoda

Buy Kokoda (Military history EBook) by Peter Fitzsimons (dd29f3d7f6594f17a878e0f3cebc1ea6) - ‘an engrossing narrative, beautifully controlled by a master storyteller' Michael McKernan, Sydney Morning Herald The bestselling, acclaimed,...
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How Spotify Engineered the New Music Economy

How Spotify Engineered the New Music Economy | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
In a post-Napster music industry, Spotify seems to have concocted a winning monetization formula, but not all its participants are happy with the numbers.
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Architecture That Drives Ecological Innovation

Architecture That Drives Ecological Innovation | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
The buildings that are home to the research and industries that work to preserve the planet's natural ecology.
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Building’s Facade Covered in Thousands of Wind Turbines

Building’s Facade Covered in Thousands of Wind Turbines | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Decode Urbanism Office, a company based in Beijing, has designed a 1,150 foot (350m) skyscraper to be located in Taichung City, Taiwan, and house the city’s Department of Urban Development, commercial concerns, museums, retail areas and exhibitions...
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MIT: The Million-Year Data Storage Disk Unveiled

MIT: The Million-Year Data Storage Disk Unveiled | Common Placebook | Scoop.it

Magnetic hard discs can store data for little more than a decade. But nanotechnologists have now designed and built a disk that can store data for a million years or more.

 

Back in 1956, IBM introduced the world’s first commercial computer capable of storing data on a magnetic disk drive. The IBM 305 RAMAC used fifty 24-inch discs to store up to 5 MB, an impressive feat in those days. Today, however, it’s not difficult to find hard drives that can store 1 TB of data on a single 3.5-inch disk. But despite this huge increase in storage density and a similarly impressive improvement in power efficiency, one thing hasn’t changed. The lifetime over which data can be stored on magnetic discs is still about a decade.

 

That raises an interesting problem. How are we to preserve information about our civilisation on a timescale that outlasts it? In other words, what technology can reliably store information for 1 million years or more?

 

Today, we get an answer thanks to the work of Jeroen de Vries at the University of Twente in the Netherlands and a few pals. These guys have designed and built a disk capable of storing data over this timescale. And they’ve performed accelerated ageing tests which show it should be able to store data for 1 million years and possibly longer.

 

These guys start with some theory about aging. Clearly, it’s impractical to conduct an ageing experiment in real time, particularly when the periods involved are measured in millions of years.  But there is a way to accelerate the process of aging.

 

This is based on the idea that data must be stored in an energy minimum that is separated from other minima by an energy barrier. So to corrupt data by converting a 0 to a 1, for example, requires enough energy to overcome this barrier.

 

The probability that the system will jump in this way is governed by an idea known as Arrhenius law. This relates the probability of jumping the barrier to factors such as its temperature, the Boltzmann constant and how often a jump can be attempted, which is related to the level of atomic vibrations.

 

Some straightforward calculations reveal that to last a million years, the required energy barrier is 63 KBT or 70 KBT to last a billion years. “These values are well within the range of today’s technology,” say de Vries and co.

 

The disk is simple in conception. The data is stored in the pattern of lines etched into a thin metal disc and then covered with a protective layer.

The metal in question is tungsten, which they chose because of its high melting temperature (3,422 degrees C) and low thermal expansion coefficient.  The protective layer is silicon nitride (Si3N4) chosen because of its high resistance to fracture and its low thermal expansion coefficient.

 

The results are impressive. According to Arrhenius law, a disk capable of surviving a million years would have to survive 1 hour at 445 Kelvin, a test that the new disks passed with ease. Indeed, they survived temperatures up to 848 Kelvin, albeit with significant amounts of information loss.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Classic Meatloaf Recipe

Classic Meatloaf Recipe | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Classic meatloaf recipe - Preheat oven to 200°C/180°C fan-forced. Grease a 9cm-deep, 9cm x 19cm (base) loaf pan. Heat oil in a medium frying pan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic....
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Christopher Pyne's review of university places cap a 'clear broken promise'

Christopher Pyne's review of university places cap a 'clear broken promise' | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
The Abbott government has been accused of reconsidering caps on tertiary places as an ''alibi for cutting university funding''.
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Rudd's down with the kids, but they're down on politics

Rudd's down with the kids, but they're down on politics | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
Quite apart from knees that crackle like popping gum while performing previously unremarkable feats like bending, you can tell you're getting old when you no longer understand young people's haircuts.
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El Nino pattern intensified by climate change: study

El Nino pattern intensified by climate change: study | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
The El Nino weather pattern that can bring drought to Australia and rain to South America was 'unusually active' at the end of the 20th century, possibly due to climate change, a University of Hawaii study found.
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Teacher sues over difficult students

Teacher sues over difficult students | Common Placebook | Scoop.it
A former public school teacher who claims he was intentionally allocated classes of a school's ''most unruly and challenging'' students is suing the state government.
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