College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Supporting school leaders in helping all students become college and career-ready and to succeed in post-secondary education and training
Curated by Mel Riddile
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5 Tips for Teaching Real World Persuasive Writing

5 Tips for Teaching Real World Persuasive Writing | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Find education news, teaching strategies, lesson plans, activity ideas and more on the WeAreTeachers blog. Featuring posts by guest bloggers and teachers as well as WeAreTeachers editors.
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Daryl Saladar's curator insight, October 24, 2013 8:09 PM

Some student-friendly insights into writing a persuasive essay.

 

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NCTM: Supporting the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

NCTM serves math teachers, math educators, and administrators by providing math resources and professional development opportunities. Working for more and better math for all students.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Math teachers support new math standards.

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Smarter Balanced Field Test Expanded -- THE Journal

The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium reported that its system is ready to handle a greater number of students than previously anticipated, so it's expanding its upcoming Field Test to allow member states to administer them to a wider...
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Rigor isn’t a characteristic of a question or a task, but the resulting thinking and work. Rigor Pt 2 | Grant Wiggins

Rigor isn’t a characteristic of a question or a task, but the resulting thinking and work.  Rigor Pt 2 | Grant Wiggins | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Rigor is a subjective quality:  it depends on a student’s knowledge and experiences.  Since different students will have different experiences with a particular question, this poses an obvious challenge for test-makers if the goal is to design questions that produce rigorous responses.  For example, the trapezoid problem discussed in Part 1 would produce a rigorous response for one kind of student but not for another.

Mel Riddile's insight:

Key Point from Grant Wiggins:


"A test is not intended to be an authentic assessment; it is a proxy for authentic assessment."

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5 Math Apps for Middle School Students

5 Math Apps for Middle School Students | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
For those parents and teachers looking for apps for middle-schoolers, check out these five great apps.
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Consortia Membership - August 2013

Consortia Membership - August 2013 | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Mel Riddile's insight:
  • Alabama - Will use ACT
  • Alaska - May use SBAC assessments
  • Georgia - Will not use PARCC assessments
  • Indiana - Withdrew from PARCC
  • Oklahoma - Will not use PARCC assessments
  • Pennsylvania - Will not use PARCC or SBAC assessments


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Standards? Yes! Current Implementation? No! | Grant Wiggins

Standards? Yes! Current Implementation? No! | Grant Wiggins | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Readers know that I am a strong supporter of Standards generally and the Common Core specifically. To me it is simply a no-brainer: there is no such thing as Georgia Algebra or Montana Writing. In ...
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Calculator Use on Exams to Shift With Common Core

Calculator Use on Exams to Shift With Common Core | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Policies emerging from the two state consortia developing common-core assessments would set limits on the device's use, and likely influence classroom practice.
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Get The Math: Algebra in the real world

Get The Math: Algebra in the real world | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Get the Math is about algebra in the real world. See how professionals use math in music, fashion, videogames, restaurants, basketball, and special effects. Then take on interactive challenges related to those careers. Watch this intro video before trying one of the challenges below.
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Too many "bubble tests" give standardized testing a "bad rap": Enter technology

Too many "bubble tests" give standardized testing a "bad rap": Enter technology | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Technology has the potential to transform teaching and learning. It is already sparking a revolution in standardized tests.
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Jenny Sloane's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:12 PM

After reading this article, I was left with many questions. First, why are some standardized tests so much more expensvie and what are the advantages to those tests? For states and schools that do not have the resources, what are they supposed to do or how can they afford even more expensive technology and tests? Furthermore, I think it is debatable whether students should receive different questions on their tests. The whole purpose of standardized tests is for every student to take the same test, hence the name "standardized". This is the first I have ever heard about having computerized tests that will change the level of difficulty of the following questions depending on the performance of the student. I think all students should take the same test; top students will just earn really high scores, but those are the scores that they deserve. If students are answering different questions how can you compare scores? I also thought it was an interesting point about "cut scores". I recently took the Praxis I exam and noticed that every state had different required scores in order to pass. I do not think that is fair. Who gets to decide what are passing scores and why should it differ from state to state? Although the Huffington Post is a reliable source, I wish this article went into more detail that would have answered some of my questions. 

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Common Core tests widen achievement gap in New York

Common Core tests widen achievement gap in New York | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
What do the scores of the new Common Core-aligned tests really mean?
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In affluent district, scores dip on new statewide reading-writing exam

FairfaxTimes.com


Educators point to new exam, higher expectations...even in states like Virginia, which as not adopted the Common Core Standards.

Mel Riddile's insight:

What this article does not mention is that, for many students, these tests are barriers to graduation. So, a drop in pass rates means that up to three times as many students failed to pass the exams, which means that principals must remediate those students with no additional funding.

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SAT: A Dramatic Makeover

SAT: A Dramatic Makeover | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

He's (Coleman) heard from organization members, who have said they want the SAT to test things that are relevant to college success. They've told him that students should be able to read and write clearly, and also have mastered a core set of mathematical concepts. "The core aspiration is to build an exam that much more clearly focuses on the skills that matter most," he said. Instead of obscure vocabulary words, students should be expected to show deep understanding of academic terms such as "synthesis" and "transform." Overall, Coleman hopes the exam will be more relevant to high school learning. "It has to engage teachers more deeply," he said.

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Common Core: A Puzzle to Public

Common Core: A Puzzle to Public | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Most respondents to a PDK/Gallup poll had never heard of the common standards—and among those who had, fewer than half said the standards would help make students more competitive internationally.
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What Do Parents Think About the Common Core Standards?

What Do Parents Think About the Common Core Standards? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
The results of this year's PDK/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Towards the Public Schools offers some heartening news for public education advocates.


Before taking the poll, only 38 percent of respondents had heard of the Common Core State Standards -- and just 45 percent of public school parentshad heard of them.

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Dana Cope's curator insight, November 14, 2013 11:36 PM

It seems that the content of the standards would be overwhelming to parents.  It is more about providing them with an overview of the gist of what parents can do with their child at home that would be most effective.  Also providing a graphic organizer with prompts about specific questions to ask their child may be helpful. 

 

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Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous: Rigor, with Grant Wiggins -- Part 1

Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous: Rigor, with Grant Wiggins -- Part 1 | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous. And rigor is surely not an absolute but relative criterion, referring to the intersection of the learner’s prior learning and the demands of the question. (This will make mass testing very difficult, of course).


To me, rigor has (at least) 3 other aspects when testing:

  1. learners must face a novel (-seeming) question,
  2. do something with an atypically high degree of precision and skill
  3. both invent and double-check the approach and result, be it in math or writing a paper.


The novel (or novel-seeming) aspect to the challenge typically means that there is some new context, look and feel, changed constraint, or other superficial oddness than what happened in prior instruction and testing. (i.e. what Bloom said had to be true of any “application” task in the Taxonomy).

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"Difference between old tests and #CommonCore tests is the difference between taking a written driving exam and getting behind the wheel."

"Difference between old tests and #CommonCore tests is the difference between taking a written driving exam and getting behind the wheel." | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
BOISE • Flash cards are gone from Christy Schwehr’s classroom at Amity Elementary School in Boise.


Education isn’t about cramming facts into kids’ heads any more. It’s not “6 times 8 is 48. Now remember it.”


Students need to visualize numbers and understand those numbers in relationship to each other as they seek to discover the answer. So a strategy card hint for figuring out 6 times 8 may say, “you know what 6 times 5 is...”

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Lexile Level Is One of Three Components of Text Complexity

Lexile Level Is One of Three Components of Text Complexity | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

The Common Core specifically says that there are “three equally important parts” of text complexity:

  1. Quantitative Dimensions - Can students read it?
  2. Qualitative Dimensions - Should students read it?
  3. Reader and Task Considerations - Do students want to read it?
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pru's curator insight, April 25, 2015 6:02 AM

Is an indication of text complexity a useful type of categorisation for school library collections and catalogues?

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New Tests to Probe Critical Thinking

New Tests to Probe Critical Thinking | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

In California, the new tests will replace the traditional Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) assessments, which were established by the legislature in 1997. The STAR tests passed into history on July 1 although the state has not yet decided what tests, if any, will be used for the current academic year.

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Does it Really Say That? Volume of reading is still important

The volume of Reading Is Still Important


The Common Core explicitly and implicitly address the issue of reading volume.

  1. On page 3 of Appendix A, they attribute “the deterioration of overall reading ability” to “the problem of the lack of reading.”
  2. They go on to say that “To grow, our students must read lots, and more specifically they must read lots of ‘complex’ texts—texts that offer new language, new knowledge, and new modes of thought.”
  3. So while they do make the argument for complex text, they also make the argument for reading volume.


Theory to Practice: Lost in the Translation


Somewhere between conception and implementation, most grand ideas grow muddled with translation. In this instance and instances like these, it is important to return to the Common Core document and ask:


Is this understanding a reflection of where the standards demonstrate shortsightedness? Or is this a reflection of what we “think” we’ve read and understood about the Common Core? Our laments must become the “guiding concern” that leads to our own close, careful reading of the Common Core document.

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Michael Rost's comment, August 27, 2013 12:54 PM
Volume is important...though as I am often reminded, the "core" of reading is interest. The motivation to read "more" has to start with personal interest.
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What Are the Common Core State Standards?

What Are the Common Core State Standards? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
The Common Core State Standards have been adopted by 45 states and the District of Columbia with the goal of better preparing the nation's students for college or a job.
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The Cs and Common Core

The Cs and Common Core | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Mission Statement

The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy.
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Grant Wiggins' View on the Math Curriculum

Grant Wiggins' View on the Math Curriculum | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

By The Jose Vilson


This week, a few of us got into a discussion, and involved Grant Wiggins. He calls himself a troublemaker, but I don’t remember seeing him at the last few meetings, and I’m the treasurer.

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