College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Supporting school leaders in helping all students become college and career-ready and to succeed in post-secondary education and training
Curated by Mel Riddile
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Common Core as a vehicle to bring three fundamental rights to all students

Common Core as a vehicle to bring three fundamental rights to all students | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

by Kathleen Porter-Magee at the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference.


"I want to talk about the Common Core as a vehicle to bring three fundamental rights to all students, but particularly our Latino and ELL students:

1.      First, this is about the right of all students to read the authentic, complex texts.

2.      Second, it’s about giving all students access to the vocabulary of power—the academic vocabulary we know students need to succeed.

3.      Finally, it’s about giving all students the support they need to exceed the expectations we’ve set."

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Use an Essential Question to Fuel Inquiry

Use an Essential Question to Fuel Inquiry | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Use an Essential Question to Fuel the Inquiry

An essential question can be a very effective tool for guiding research and tapping into students' enthusiasm for inquiry and learning. These questions provide students with challenges that allow them to invest in the learning process as they make decisions about their own learning. Since essential questions do not have one correct answer, students can choose flexible learning paths to find success and demonstrate learning.

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Les Howard's curator insight, October 21, 2013 9:39 AM

Teachers can take advantage of Halloween writing activities that focus on gathering information from sources through research to present information about haunted places, dispel or defend myths, and present conclusions that are based in fact to support the CCSS Shift 5.

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Fact-checking attacks on Common Core school standards

Fact-checking attacks on Common Core school standards | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
As states surge toward full implementation of Common Core State Standards for public schools, the din is rising from some fronts to pull back. In Florida, Gov.
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3 Lessons Kentucky Can Teach the Rest of the U.S. About the Common Core

3 Lessons Kentucky Can Teach the Rest of the U.S. About the Common Core | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Kentucky’s experience over the past three school years suggests it will be

  1. a slow and potentially frustrating road ahead for the other states that are using the Common Core.
  2. Test scores are still dismal, and state officials have expressed concern that the pace of improvement is not fast enough.
  3. Districts have also seen varying success in changing how teachers teach, something that was supposed to change under the new standards.
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 15, 2016 10:59 AM

THANK YOU FOR VIEWING SHARING AND RESPONDING THANK YOU 

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Common Core "are better than 85 or 90 percent of the state standards they replace."

Common Core "are better than 85 or 90 percent of the state standards they replace." | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
A major requirement for the Common Core State Standards was that they be internationally benchmarked. But there has been debate about how well the standards match those of countries like Singapore.
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Andrea Johnson's curator insight, October 17, 2013 12:52 PM

They are better because now they cover K to 12!  

Andrea Johnson's curator insight, October 17, 2013 12:52 PM

Yes!

gabe grant's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:25 AM

Interesting.

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Common Core standards put focus back on critical thinking

Common Core standards put focus back on critical thinking | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

In Julie Shankle’s English class at North High in Torrance, the Macbeth unit is no longer just the study of a 17th century play about a man who commits murder in a bid to become king and maintain power. Now, her 12th-grade lesson has an added element: Students must mine data to produce an essay based on the prompt, “Is killing ever justified?” This means making a compelling case and citing credible sources — perhaps a news article on euthanasia, or a TED Talks video of a professor expounding on the death penalty.

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A tale of two transitions to Common Core education standards

A tale of two transitions to Common Core education standards | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

The Center for Investigative Reporting


Common Core also encourages teachers to spend less time lecturing and more time getting students to be actively involved in learning.

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Cutting to the Common Core: Analyzing Informational Text

Cutting to the Common Core: Analyzing Informational Text | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

"The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) for reading focus heavily on students gathering evidence, knowledge, and insights from what they read. In fact, 80-90% of the reading standards in every grade require text-dependent analysis — being able to answer questions only by referring back to the assigned text, not by drawing upon and referencing prior knowledge and experiences."

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How the Common Core State Standards Will Transform English Language Arts Instruction

How the Common Core State Standards Will Transform English Language Arts Instruction | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

By Tim Shanahan

With the Common Core State Standards, instruction in English language arts will dramatically change. Unlike prior state standards, these new standards place a greater emphasis on reading challenging texts.

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One of the most important reading and writing skills: Showing Evidence

One of the most important reading and writing skills: Showing Evidence | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Common Core skill: Showing evidence from the text to support your answer
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Katie Halberg's curator insight, October 15, 2013 11:14 PM

I really enjoyed reading this, It states how with a little hard work and using are minds we can answer easy questions like "how did reading that book make you feel" the answer to that questions is not inside that book, you have to read the book to use your own feelings and thoughts to answer the question. it always shows how times have changed and auto books help the few people who wont really open a book to read it or may not know how to read very well but still want to know more about whats inside the book.

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, October 17, 2013 12:33 PM

One of the most important reading and writing skills students should practice is showing evidence from the text to support their answers. However, many of my students struggle with this. In the past, our students have been programmed to fill in a bubble answer on a standardized test that shows the evidence rather than try to find it themselves.

Show your students how to give evidence by demonstrating it (see visual aid, above).
My example question is from Divergent by Veronica Roth. It asks: “How does Beatrice’s mother feel about her? Give evidence from chapter one to support your answer.”

In the past, students may have just given me short answers like, "She cares about her daughter." By asking for evidence, students can't just give their opinion. We know their opinion is based on something, so they have to be further prompted to tell us what they based it on. Therefore, the student's answer should include not only their opinion, but one or two examples from the text that show this. Their answers should be paraphrased, but they still need to include the page number. 
This question-strategy helps those struggling readers find the right answers, as well. If a student wrote, "She's mean," he/she would have to back it up with an example from the chapter that shows Beatrice's mother is mean. When he/she can't find an example, he/she will have to re-think his/her original opinion. 
For students who are really struggling, I may prompt them orally with questions like, "Look at the non-verbal clues: what is Beatrice's mom doing to Beatrice in the first scene of the book? What does her mood seem to be? How do you know she feels this way? When a mother acts this way toward a child, what does it indicate about how she feels toward the child?" 


There are always a handful of students who complain that they can't find the answers in the book. If you have these same complainers, these are your students who are not reading the book. Because even students who have severe learning disabilities can answer the questions when they read it (or listen to the text).

So here's what I say to the complainers: "You aren't going to find a single sentence that gives you the answer to the question. And the answer isn't merely your opinion, either. The answer comes from that feeling you get about the character, or the theme, or whatever it is you're looking for. It's based on what you've inferred and gathered from descriptions and dialogue that can only come from reading it. Simply put, there is no short cut. The text must be read to answer the questions."

[Insert student groans.] After they channel their inner first-grader and throw another "I don't want to read" fit, they usually buck up and start reading.

Note: I do not mind allowing students to listen to audio of the text, especially if they follow along with their books. If this is the only way to get those reluctant readers to read, I say go for it. Today's teens are not like us. They learn much differently; we need to access and use every resource, device, and strategy to help them read on their own.

If you need handouts for instituting the Common Core standards into your curriculum, I have you covered! Check out all these great resources, ready to use with ANY text (fiction or non-fiction):
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6,7,8
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 9-10 (Also covers grades 6-8)
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 11-12 (Also covers grades 6-10)

For non-fiction text and historical documents:
CCSS History & Social Studies Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6-12

For non-fiction and scientific texts:
CCSS Science & Technical Subjects Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6-12
FREE: CCSS Science & Technical Subjects Reading Graphic Organizers for RST.1, Grades 6-12

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Teaching to the Wrong Tests

Teaching to the Wrong Tests | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
California students are thankfully done with the old Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) program, and for better or worse, are moving on to the Common Core aligned Smarter Balanced assessment...
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Common core scores could show 40 percent drop -

LAURINBURG — Due to heightened achievement standards, the North Carolina Department of Instruction has forecasted that scores from spring ...
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Fractions: Using a Number Line to Teach Fractions

Fractions: Using a Number Line to Teach Fractions | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Teachers in this multimedia presentation from Doing What Works demonstrate the use of a double-scaled, open number line to teach fractions to upper elementary students.
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Todd Parker's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:59 PM

This is a video with strategies for math instruction using open number lines.  One of the strategies was for teaching fractions.  I like how using the open number line lets students choose what numbers to use to represent the fractions.  Different students might use different numbers.  They are only limited by using numbers with factors that correspond with the fractions.  In the case of fractions they use a "double open" number line with numbers on the bottom and fractions on top.  This method helps students use problem solving skills and take charge of some of the process.  It also calls upon their previous knowledge of factors.  I've never used this method, but it seems like something that I would want to try with fifth graders.  I also like that in part of the video there is an anchor poster with problem solving strategies on it.  Maybe I need one of those as well.  All of the anchor posters in my class are dedicated to reading and writing.

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Writing - Common Core Connections

Writing - Common Core Connections | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

The Common Core Standards identify six instructional shifts necessary for effective implementation of the ELA/Literacy strand. These instructional shifts provide a framework to help us understand the big picture before diving into the specific individual standards. 


Use an Essential Question to Fuel the Inquiry

An essential question can be a very effective tool for guiding research and tapping into students' enthusiasm for inquiry and learning. These questions provide students with challenges that allow them to invest in the learning process as they make decisions about their own learning. Since essential questions do not have one correct answer, students can choose flexible learning paths to find success and demonstrate learning.

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Keyboarding Skills Will Be Essential in CCSS-Aligned Classrooms

Keyboarding Skills Will Be Essential in CCSS-Aligned Classrooms | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Many of the 46 states that have adopted the Common Core State Standards are nearing their individual implementation deadlines.
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How Eight States are Handling the Common Core | Hechinger Report

How Eight States are Handling the Common Core | Hechinger Report | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

NY, TN, LA, PA, CA, FL, KY, CO

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Nicole 's curator insight, October 18, 2013 8:57 AM

Language and Literacy is major!

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Common Core standards add writing to the equation

Common Core standards add writing to the equation | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
One of the big ideas behind the Common Core is to break down barriers between subjects, encouraging math students to write about problems rather than merely turn in a row of numbers.
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hedgeshandy's comment, October 17, 2013 6:27 AM
Its striking<br>
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Don't blame the Common Core for local curriculum decisions

Don't blame the Common Core for local curriculum decisions | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Even in the Common Core era, local leaders and school-level educators determine the programs that get taught and the books that get assigned.
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G.E.D. Raises the Bar: More rigorous, expensive, fewer passing scores

G.E.D. Raises the Bar: More rigorous, expensive, fewer passing scores | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

At a time when a high school diploma — much less an equivalency certificate — is losing currency in the labor market, exams being introduced in January will start to be aligned with the Common Core, a set of rigorous academic standards for kindergarten through 12th grade that 45 states and the District of Columbia have adopted.

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The importance of praise on student achievement

In September, schools leaders engaged in a close reading of work by Carol Dweck (exemplar here) describing “fixed mindsets” and “growth mindsets.” The following video demonstrates how praising 5th ...
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Math Standards: Dr. William Schmidt's Presentation

Math Standards: Dr. William Schmidt's Presentation | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Dr. William Schmidt today released key conclusions from his research detailing how the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for mathematics can potentially improve the performance of U.S. students if implemented appropriately. In an event co-sponsored by Achieve, Chiefs for Change and the Foundation for Excellence in Education, Dr. Schmidt presented a briefing on his work: Common Core State Standards Math: The Relationship Between High Standards, Systemic Implementation and Student AchievementDownload the PowerPoint.

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Vanessa Chaparro's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:22 PM

Common Core is a topic that has been in the news a lot lately because it has promises and flaws that are beginning to show. Yes it is nice to have the same curriculum being taught on the east and west coast of the U.S. , but that is not sufficient because not every teacher may have had the proper training. Even if mathematics is standarized, it does not mean that students will be standarized to intake the information. Some students like math and those will succeed no matter what level they are taught. Math standards will however establish a descent level to seem appropriate for the general student.

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Common-Core Rollout Ripe for Studying, Experts Say

Common-Core Rollout Ripe for Studying, Experts Say | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
R&D is needed if new standards are going to improve learning, say educators and researchers, but making that happen could be a tricky business.
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State Assessments Tell Schools, Students and Parents Nothing

State Assessments Tell Schools, Students and Parents Nothing | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Assessments are supposed to help students learn their strengths and weaknesses, but state assessment results only come as a number for schools, which makes them useless.
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Chelsi Rosen's curator insight, March 10, 2014 10:21 AM

"The state standardized tests provide nothing of value, nothing to help teachers help students, nothing to inform teachers about their strengths and weaknesses. They are worthless." This article directly relates to my latest narrative report. This confirms my assumptions about state testing, yet I am still open minded to a rebuttal.