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College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) supporting school leaders in helping all students become college and career-ready and to succeed in post-secondary education and training
Curated by Mel Riddile
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Literacy By Third-Grade A Renewed Priority For Many States

Literacy By Third-Grade A Renewed Priority For Many States | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Huffington Post

September 6, 2013


Flunked, retained, held back. Whatever you call it, increasing numbers of states are not promoting students who are struggling to read at the end of third grade.


Thirty-two states have passed legislation designed to improve third-grade literacy, according to the Education Commission of the States. Retention is part of the policies in 14 states, with some offering more leeway than others.


"Passing children up the grade ladder when we know they can't read is irresponsible – and cruel," said Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback in announcing in his recent State of the State address that third-graders should demonstrate an ability to read before being promoted. He also proposed a $12 million program for improving third-graders' reading skills.

Mel Riddile's insight:

We have known for years that many students enter school one or two years behind their peers in language acquisition. That means that K-3 teachers must help students make two years of progress every year if they are to catch up by third grade. These students need additional learning time before school, after school, on Saturdays, or in year round programs. Unfortunately, some states have turned to retaining students so that when they take the NAEP test, they are a year older than their peers in other states. NAEP scores (Florida) will rise, but the long-term consequences are problematic. Even if students reach proficiency by third grade, those coming from under-resourced homes will need direct explicit literacy instruction every year or those early gains will dissipate.

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Close reading is not just academic. Close reading impacts our everyday lives.

Close reading is not just academic.  Close reading impacts our everyday lives. | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Really, another post on Close Reading?  Oh, yes! And here's why. I had the privilege of hearing Kate Roberts (@teachkate) passionately illuminate Close Reading at a session at Teachers College Writ...
Mel Riddile's insight:

Keep in mind Patricia Kain's (Harvard) three steps for close reading:

  1. “Read with  a pencil in hand, and annotate the text.
  2. Look for patterns in the things you’ve noticed about the text—repetitions, contradictions, similarities.
  3. Ask questions about the patterns you’ve noticed—especially how and why.” (Kain, P.How to Do a Close Reading, Harvard University, 1998.
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Stay with Common Core: "We have it right.

Stay with Common Core: "We have it right. | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
I asked mathematicians to respond to a recent critique on the blog of Common Core State Standards in math.
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NCLB Waivers: at-risk students must have access to the best teachers.

NCLB Waivers: at-risk students must have access to the best teachers. | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Through its ESEA waivers, the U.S. Department of Education is renewing a focus on ensuring at-risk students have access to effective teachers.
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Math: With Common Core, Fewer Topics Covered, More Math Learned

Math: With Common Core, Fewer Topics Covered, More Math Learned | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
As states adopt the new Common Core standards for math education, teachers prepare for a shift from breadth to depth, particularly in the earlier grades.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Students will not "learn less math this year." Rather, teachers will cover fewer math topics in more depth. Thus, students will actually learn more math.

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Oregon schools prepare tougher, more incisive lessons for statewide rollout of Common Core

Oregon schools prepare tougher, more incisive lessons for statewide rollout of Common Core | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
In place of Oregon's more lax standards in reading, writing, math and analysis, new standards adopted by 45 states call on Oregon students to step up their critical thinking and analytical writing.
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SAT: A Dramatic Makeover

SAT: A Dramatic Makeover | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

He's (Coleman) heard from organization members, who have said they want the SAT to test things that are relevant to college success. They've told him that students should be able to read and write clearly, and also have mastered a core set of mathematical concepts. "The core aspiration is to build an exam that much more clearly focuses on the skills that matter most," he said. Instead of obscure vocabulary words, students should be expected to show deep understanding of academic terms such as "synthesis" and "transform." Overall, Coleman hopes the exam will be more relevant to high school learning. "It has to engage teachers more deeply," he said.

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Common Core: A Puzzle to Public

Common Core: A Puzzle to Public | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Most respondents to a PDK/Gallup poll had never heard of the common standards—and among those who had, fewer than half said the standards would help make students more competitive internationally.
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What Do Parents Think About the Common Core Standards?

What Do Parents Think About the Common Core Standards? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
The results of this year's PDK/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Towards the Public Schools offers some heartening news for public education advocates.


Before taking the poll, only 38 percent of respondents had heard of the Common Core State Standards -- and just 45 percent of public school parentshad heard of them.

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Dana Cope's curator insight, November 14, 2013 11:36 PM

It seems that the content of the standards would be overwhelming to parents.  It is more about providing them with an overview of the gist of what parents can do with their child at home that would be most effective.  Also providing a graphic organizer with prompts about specific questions to ask their child may be helpful. 

 

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Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous: Rigor, with Grant Wiggins -- Part 1

Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous: Rigor, with Grant Wiggins -- Part 1 | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous. And rigor is surely not an absolute but relative criterion, referring to the intersection of the learner’s prior learning and the demands of the question. (This will make mass testing very difficult, of course).


To me, rigor has (at least) 3 other aspects when testing:

  1. learners must face a novel (-seeming) question,
  2. do something with an atypically high degree of precision and skill
  3. both invent and double-check the approach and result, be it in math or writing a paper.


The novel (or novel-seeming) aspect to the challenge typically means that there is some new context, look and feel, changed constraint, or other superficial oddness than what happened in prior instruction and testing. (i.e. what Bloom said had to be true of any “application” task in the Taxonomy).

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"Difference between old tests and #CommonCore tests is the difference between taking a written driving exam and getting behind the wheel."

"Difference between old tests and #CommonCore tests is the difference between taking a written driving exam and getting behind the wheel." | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
BOISE • Flash cards are gone from Christy Schwehr’s classroom at Amity Elementary School in Boise.


Education isn’t about cramming facts into kids’ heads any more. It’s not “6 times 8 is 48. Now remember it.”


Students need to visualize numbers and understand those numbers in relationship to each other as they seek to discover the answer. So a strategy card hint for figuring out 6 times 8 may say, “you know what 6 times 5 is...”

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Lexile Level Is One of Three Components of Text Complexity

Lexile Level Is One of Three Components of Text Complexity | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

The Common Core specifically says that there are “three equally important parts” of text complexity:

  1. Quantitative Dimensions - Can students read it?
  2. Qualitative Dimensions - Should students read it?
  3. Reader and Task Considerations - Do students want to read it?
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Importance of Common Core - National Teacher of the Year Jeff Charbonneau

2013 National Teacher of the Year Jeff Charbonneau talks about the importance of Common Core State Standards to him as a teacher and as a parent. Jeff is a high school science teacher.

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Common Core recognizes three tiers of vocabulary

Common Core recognizes three tiers of vocabulary | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

3 Simple Tools to Support the CCSS Academic Vocabulary Shift

Getting Smart


by Susan Oxnevad -


The Common Core identifies six instructional shifts needed to effectively implement the standards in ELA/Literacy. Shift 6 suggests an instructional change in
the teaching of Academic Vocabulary.

Mel Riddile's insight:

For many schools explicit vocabulary instruction may represent a quick-win in building literacy skills. Teachers already teach Tier 1 and Tier 3 vocabulary. Tier 2 vocabulary should be the focus of school wide efforts to improve reading and literacy skills.


The Common Core recognizes three tiers of vocabulary.

Tier 1

Words acquired through every day speech, usually learned in the early grades.

Tier 2

Academic words that appear across all types of text. These are often precise words that are used by the author in place of common words. (i.e. gallop instead of run). They change meaning with use.

Tier 3

Domain specific words” that are specifically tied to content. (i.e. Constitution, lava) These are typically the types of vocabulary words that are included in glossaries, highlighted in textbooks and address by teachers. They are considered difficult words important to understanding content.

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If Mass. were a country, its eighth graders would rank 2nd in the world in science

If Mass. were a country, its eighth graders would rank 2nd in the world in science | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Expecting the Best Yields Results in Massachusetts
Adopting rigorous standards, and sticking with them while giving teachers some breathing room, has helped Massachusetts’ students rise to No. 1 in the nation on science and math achievement.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Key points:


Mass. has the highest NAEP scores. 


New standards were adopted in 1993. Mass. has had two decades to implement more rigorous standards.


The state did not:

  1. offer vouchers for private schools
  2. close poorly performing schools
  3. eliminate tenure for teachers
  4. add merit pay


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Evidence & Arguments: Multiple Ways of Experiencing a Text

Evidence & Arguments: Multiple Ways of Experiencing a Text | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Watch how you can do a literacy analysis with your High School students using evidence and arguments.
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What Close Reading Is and Is Not

What Close Reading Is and Is Not | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

In the opening chapter of our book we share a brief history of close reading across decades, but here we would like to share our current–and evolving–thinking on the use of the term today:

Mel Riddile's insight:

What do you think of this definition of close reading?


Close reading is when a reader independently stops at moments in a text (or media or life) to reread and observe the choices an author has made. He or shereflects on those observations to reach for new understandings that can color the way the rest of the book is read (or song heard or life lived) and thought about.


This definition needs to include 'as evidenced by'...highlighting, annotation, notetaking, writing, and discussion...

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, September 2, 2013 9:32 AM

This is so true!  It's great to have the non-examples; it's not just guided reading or "shut up sheets."

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5 Tips for Teaching Real World Persuasive Writing

5 Tips for Teaching Real World Persuasive Writing | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Find education news, teaching strategies, lesson plans, activity ideas and more on the WeAreTeachers blog. Featuring posts by guest bloggers and teachers as well as WeAreTeachers editors.
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Daryl Saladar's curator insight, October 24, 2013 8:09 PM

Some student-friendly insights into writing a persuasive essay.

 

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NCTM: Supporting the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

NCTM serves math teachers, math educators, and administrators by providing math resources and professional development opportunities. Working for more and better math for all students.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Math teachers support new math standards.

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Smarter Balanced Field Test Expanded -- THE Journal

The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium reported that its system is ready to handle a greater number of students than previously anticipated, so it's expanding its upcoming Field Test to allow member states to administer them to a wider...
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Rigor isn’t a characteristic of a question or a task, but the resulting thinking and work. Rigor Pt 2 | Grant Wiggins

Rigor isn’t a characteristic of a question or a task, but the resulting thinking and work.  Rigor Pt 2 | Grant Wiggins | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Rigor is a subjective quality:  it depends on a student’s knowledge and experiences.  Since different students will have different experiences with a particular question, this poses an obvious challenge for test-makers if the goal is to design questions that produce rigorous responses.  For example, the trapezoid problem discussed in Part 1 would produce a rigorous response for one kind of student but not for another.

Mel Riddile's insight:

Key Point from Grant Wiggins:


"A test is not intended to be an authentic assessment; it is a proxy for authentic assessment."

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5 Math Apps for Middle School Students

5 Math Apps for Middle School Students | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
For those parents and teachers looking for apps for middle-schoolers, check out these five great apps.
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Consortia Membership - August 2013

Consortia Membership - August 2013 | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Mel Riddile's insight:
  • Alabama - Will use ACT
  • Alaska - May use SBAC assessments
  • Georgia - Will not use PARCC assessments
  • Indiana - Withdrew from PARCC
  • Oklahoma - Will not use PARCC assessments
  • Pennsylvania - Will not use PARCC or SBAC assessments


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