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College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
The National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) supporting school leaders in helping all students become college and career-ready and to succeed in post-secondary education and training
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Blooming on the Horizon: Common Core Math by Mr. P

Blooming on the Horizon: Common Core Math by Mr. P | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
I’ve spent some time – as I’m sure many others have – analyzing and evaluating the Common Core Standards. I've focused on 8th grade mathematics. Forty-four states will adopt these standards...
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Common Core 8 Mathematical Practices via My Web 2.0 Journey

Common Core 8 Mathematical Practices via My Web 2.0 Journey | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

High school math teacher reflects on two-day Common Core training.


1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

4. Model with mathematics.

5. Use appropriate tools strategically.

6. Attend to precision.

7. Look for and make use of structure.

8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

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Common Core Implementation Workbook | PARCC

Common Core Implementation Workbook | PARCC | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Achieve and the U.S. Education Delivery Institute have developed a practical Common Core Implementation Workbook for all states in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC).

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Teaching to the Common Core State Standards Using Blended Instruction

Video


Teach technology and media literacy while providing students more opportunities to develop their reading, writing, communication, critical thinking and problem solving skills. More effectively prepare your students for life beyond high school!

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Common Core - Reports

Common Core - Reports | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Common Core creates high-quality, low-cost CCSS-based curriculum tools. We are a non-profit founded in 2007 to keep all of the liberal arts and sciences in the classroom.
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Writing Units aligned with the #commoncore

Writing Units aligned with the #commoncore | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Oakland Schools, the largest ISD in Michigan, serves 28 districts. These writing units for grades 6-8 are aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

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Common Core Brings K-12, Higher Ed. Together

Common Core Brings K-12, Higher Ed. Together | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
At a 3-day session in Kentucky, leaders along the K-16 pipeline gather to discuss strategies that work and the challenges that lie ahead.
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How Will Education Change if Kid's Cognition is Changing? the Atlantic

How Will Education Change if Kid's Cognition is Changing? the Atlantic | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

A new Pew survey considers the intellectual future of the millennial generation.


The survey found, overall, what many others already have:

  • that neuroplasticity is, indeed, a thing; that multitasking is, indeed, the new norm;
  • that hyperconnectivity may be leading to a lack of patience and concentration;
  • that an "always on" ethos may be encouraging a culture of expectation and instant gratification.


The Have's and Have Not's


The rich will get even richer!


"There is a palpable concern among these experts," Rainie puts it, "that new social and economic divisions will emerge as those who are motivated and well-schooled reap rewards that are not matched by those who fail to master new media and tech literacies." As a result: "Many of the experts called for reinvention of public education to teach those skills and help learners avoid some of the obvious pitfalls of a hyper-connected lifestyle."


Skills Most Desireable

  • public problem-solving through cooperative work
  • crowdsourcing and the like
  • the ability to search effectively for information online
  • the ability to distinguish the quality and veracity of online discoveries
  • the ability to synthesize, or combine facts and details from different sources into coherent narratives
  • the ability to concentrate
  • the ability to distinguish between the signal and the noise as the information we're exposed to gets bigger, and broader, and more plentiful.

All these skills can be taught. The question is whether kids will learn them in school, or outside of it.



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CCSSO Leader Rallies Higher Education for Common Core

CCSSO Leader Rallies Higher Education for Common Core | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

"Precollegiate and postsecondary education have been like toddlers, playing side by side in the sandbox but not together, and they've got to start playing together if students are going to be well prepared for college and good jobs."



That was the message that Gene Wilhoit, the executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, carried to a national forum of K-12 and higher education officials here. The event is aimed at defining how two sectors that haven't historically worked closely together can collaborate in the interest of turning the new common standards into better teaching and learning. (The CCSSO and the National Governors Association co-led the initiative that resulted in the standards, which have now been adopted by all but four states.)

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What’s New About the Common Core State Standards?

Are the Common Core Standards more rigorous?


Sue Gendron:


Much higher. In the work I’m involved in with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, we’re actually using a cognitive rigor matrix that was developed in 2009. It uses Bloom’s taxonomy and Norman Webb’s depth of knowledge to define what students need to be able to demonstrate to show that they’ve achieved proficiency.

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GED tests to get a lot harder in 2014 - Correlate to #CommonCore | Conway Daily Sun

GED administrators are reaching out to adults who wish to earn a Certificate of High School Equivalency and encouraging them to complete and pass the current GED tests.


The tests will be changing on Jan. 1, 2014.


According to the GED Testing Service LLC which is developing the new GED tests, the 2014 version will be administered on computers and will be correlated to the Common Core State Standards.

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You can't do the math without the words

You can't do the math without the words | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Science Daily

February 21, 2012


Essential Question: Is there a relationship between literacy (reading, writing, listening, speaking) and math competencies?


Findings: from the Journal of Cognitive Science


"Number words are essential tools of thought required to solve even the simplest quantitative problems, such as one-to-one correspondence."


"The findings support the idea that language is a key component in processes of the mind. "When they've been introduced to those words, their performance improved, so it's clearly a linguistic effect, rather than a generally cultural factor."


Most people learn to count when they are children. Yet surprisingly, not all languages have words for numbers.


A recent study published in the journal of Cognitive Science shows that a few tongues lack number words and as a result, people in these cultures have a difficult time performing common quantitative tasks.


The findings add new insight to the way people acquire knowledge, perception and reasoning.


An anthropological linguist has shown that the language of the Piraha, an Amazonian tribe, lacks number words and as a result the people have a difficult time performing common quantitative tasks.

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Common Core Mathematics Resources via HCSEC

Common Core Mathematics Resources via HCSEC | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Hamilton County Education Services Center


Mathematics Resources

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Hechinger Report | There are no miracles, but there are teachers: An educator’s view on the Common Core

Hechinger Report | There are no miracles, but there are teachers: An educator’s view on the Common Core | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Ask 10 fifth-grade teachers how they teach fractions, and you’ll probably get 10 different answers. That’s the beauty of teaching: part art, part science, all creativity.


Will the Common Core State Standards change that? Will we suddenly have a nation of automatons at the front of our classrooms, delivering identical lessons?


As a teacher, I think not. To me, the Common Core represents an empowering opportunity for teachers to collaborate, exchange best practices and share differing curricula­—because a common set of standards is not the same thing as a common curriculum.

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Common Core Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool | PARCC

Common Core Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool | PARCC | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Mere adoption of the Common Core State Standards will be insufficient.


Success in each state will hinge on implementation:

  • the strategies used to improve instruction in every classroom,
  • the tiered supports provided to all students
  • policy changes to promote coherence and alignment and a commitment to building and maintaining widespread understanding of and support for the new standards.


To assist states in gauging the strength of their implementation plans and to illustrate how to improve them, Education First and Achieve have partnered on the development of a new “Common Core State Standards Implementation Rubric and Self-Assessment Tool.” This is no easy task, and will require states to assume a far stronger leadership role than most have in the past. This tool sets a high quality standard for a strong state role, provides some concrete details and examples to help state leaders get there and profiles some promising state approaches. Recognizing differences in state tradition, restrictions and authority for education as well as the central role of districts and other partners in implementation, the rubric identifies a strong state role that attends to three essential outcomes:

  • Accountability for results
  • Quality of services and products
  • Alignment of services and products with the expectations articulated in the CCSS.
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The war against the Common Core: Answers to 5 criticisms

The war against the Common Core: Answers to 5 criticisms | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

By Chester E. Finn


So why the nonstop attacks against it? 

  1. Flawed?
    First, a few earnest critics are convinced that the standards are substantively flawed, that the algebra sequence (or grade level) is wrong, the English standards don’t contain enough literature, the emphasis on “math facts” isn’t as strong as it should be, etc. This sort of thing has accompanied every past set of standards of every sort, and it’s perfectly legitimate. Insofar as such criticisms are warranted, the Common Core can be revised, states can add standards of their own, and jurisdictions that find the common version truly unsatisfactory can change their minds about using it at all.
     
  2. Expensive?
    Second, the Common Core will be difficult and expensive to implement. Many organizations are working hard to help states surmount these genuine challenges. Many philanthropists are kicking money into the effort. And some groups (Fordham included) are trying to cost it all out. Nobody denies that doing this right will be hard and costly (though some of those costs are already embedded in state and district budgets.) Of course, those who think the country is doing OK today have every reason to shirk that challenge and stick with what they’re used to.
     
  3. Won't Raise Achievement?
    Third, the Common Core won’t make any difference in student achievement—but may cause a politically-unacceptable level of student failure. As noted above, standards per se do not boost achievement. (Of course, standards per se don’t carry costs or failure rates, either. They don’t, by themselves, do much of anything!) And failure rates will worsen only if (a) the new assessments are truly rigorous and (b) schools neglect preparing their pupils to pass them.
     
  4. Some states will regress?
    Fourth, states have done as well, or better, on their own, and switching over to the Common Core will just mess them up. This criticism mostly emanates from Massachusetts, which has done a commendable job on its own and where the decision to adopt the Common Core was truly conflicted. Other states that prefer to go it alone, mostly notably Texas and Virginia, have simply declined to adopt the Common Core. Others are free to exit from it (though doing so would, for some, violate commitments they made in their Race to the Top proposals.)
     
  5. National is scary?
    Fifth, “national” is not the right way to do anything in American education. We retain a deep (if, in my view, unwarranted) affection for “local control” in this realm and constitutional responsibility for education is undeniably vested in the states. Some folks dread the prospect of a “national curriculum.” (Some simply mistrust the Gates Foundation, which has bankrolled much of this work.) Others are incapable (perhaps willfully so) of seeing any distinction between “national” and “federal”, though we seem to have no difficulty making that distinction elsewhere in education. (E.g. National Governors Association, S.A.T., A.P., ACT.)
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Khan Academy Videos Mapped to Common Core

Master Connect has launched 1,724 Khan Academy videos – ALL mapped to the Common Core!


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The CCSS and KWL: Reading to Learn and Confirm

The CCSS and KWL: Reading to Learn and Confirm | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

The CCSS reveal the integrated nature of real reading comprehension among the domains: key ideas, text structure, integration of knowledge & ideas, and text complexity.


K-W-L


The idea is that before reading, good readers question themselves to access prior knowledge and establish a foundation on which they can build knowledge about the subject or topic at hand.

  • The “K” stands for “what we know” and metacognitvely allows for access of background knowledge.
  • The “W” stands for “what we want to find out” to establish reading purpose for the “during” reading process.
  • Finally, the “L” or “what I learned” is the “after” reading step that promotes reading reflection. Good readers, the theory goes, consider what they knew before reading, recognize gaps in knowledge and finally, consider what was read or learned in relation to what they already knew or hoped to learn.


Reading to Learn and Confirm


  • The expectations of the CCSS demand that readers be able to identify what they learned and support that learning with clear citations from the text.
  • This implies that learners or readers may find that some of their assumptions were wrong or that some of their positions have been swayed by the arguments of the text.
  • Moreover, the CCSS demand that readers look beyond the superficial or literal implications of a text and explore what questions or implications are nuanced by the text.


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New curriculum may add up to harder work more rigor

New curriculum may add up to harder work more rigor | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
In the modern world of education, 2+2 won't = 4
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Student Engagement: How Do We Know When Students Are Engaged? | Edutopia

Student Engagement: How Do We Know When Students Are Engaged? | Edutopia | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

I like Anita Archers definition of engagement: Students are actively interacting with their teacher or other students in relation to the topic or content of the lesson.


Blogger Ben Johnson defines student engagement and describes what it looks like in the classroom.


Michael Schmoker shares in his book, Results Now, a study that found of 1,500 classrooms visited, 85 percent of them had engaged less than 50 percent of the students. In other words, only 15 percent of the classrooms had more than half of the class at least paying attention to the lesson.


Teacher-Directed Learning
You will see students...

  • Paying attention (alert, tracking with their eyes)
  • Taking notes (particularly Cornell)
  • Listening (as opposed to chatting, or sleeping)
  • Asking questions (content related, or in a game, like 21 questions or I-Spy)
  • Responding to questions (whole group, small group, four corners, Socratic Seminar)
  • Following requests (participating, Total Physical Response (TPR), storytelling, Simon Says)
  • Reacting (laughing, crying, shouting, etc.)
Student-Directed Learning
You see students individually or in small groups...
  • Reading critically (with pen in hand)
  • Writing to learn, creating, planning, problem solving, discussing, debating, and asking questions)
  • Performing/presenting, inquiring, exploring, explaining, evaluating, and experimenting)
  • Interacting with other students, gesturing and moving
I disagree with this statement...
"I believe that the majority of teachers pick up on the audience cues as they direct-teach and can tell if a student is not interested or not engaged."
  1. Teachers can tell if students are engaged when observing other people's classes, but when they are in the moment they have tough time doing so. 
  2. Assuming that teachers do know when students are engaged, they don't know what to do to get them engaged.
  3. However, they can learn and it is relatively painless.
"A lecture is still a lecture." (agree)
Want to engage students?
  1. Make them work while you watch. They don't learn much listening to you anyway. Students learn by doing something--actively interacting.
  2. Stop calling only on students who raise their hands. Stop answering your own questions. Give the students a chance to think and respond.
  3. Randomnly call on students--"cold call" them.


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Common Core implementation-cost estimates "shaky"

Common Core implementation-cost estimates "shaky" | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

The Pioneer Institute—no friends of the Common Core to begin with—released a report this week claiming that it will cost the nation $16 billion to implement the new standards. (If you read the full text, the authors frequently note that this is, in their opinion, a wild underestimate.)


The astronomical estimate is not entirely surprising. If you want to scare cash-strapped states away from moving forward with their Common Core plans, it’s not hard to attach a frighteningly large price tag to implementation. After all, the purpose of standards is to create the foundation upon which the entire education system is built. So, obviously, changing standards must mean knocking down the house, re-pouring the foundation, and starting again.

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KY Gov. touts common core standards in education

KY Gov. touts common core standards in education | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

February 28, 2012


LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - Kentucky's first-in the-nation acceptance of common core standards in education ranks as a "defining step" in its efforts to develop world-class schools, Gov. Steve Beshear told a conference on Tuesday.


Those standards are benchmarks designed to ensure a uniform public K-12 education from state to state. Coursework using the new standards began to be implemented this year in Kentucky's public schools.


Kentucky was the first state to adopt the standards. In doing so, the state will "move us closer toward positioning our children for success" in college and in their careers, the Democratic governor said. "It was a defining step in our ongoing effort ... to build a world-class education system for our people."

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A False Start on Common Core - Early efforts inadequate to support implementation!

A False Start on Common Core - Early efforts inadequate to support implementation! | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Joellen Killion
Senior Advisor, Learning Forward


Early efforts inadequate to support implementation!


A flurry of professional learning is occurring in states that are working to implement the Common Core State Standards. Most of these states have decided to begin at what seems like a logical point: unpacking the standards.


In these unpacking sessions, teachers and principals study the new standards, reach an understanding of the cognitive demand embedded in them, and prepare for the work required to transform their teaching to implement the standards.


While these early efforts may lay the foundation for understanding the new standards, they are inadequate to support implementation.


States Need to Shift Gears


...to begin real work of implementation.


Quality Professional Learning

enriches content knowledge

enhances pedagogy

pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) -- knowing how students learn various disciplines and the major concepts within those disciplines.


More than PLCs


"professional learning community model rarely embeds deep learning about content, pedagogy, and PCK"


Needed: Mindset and Change Leadership


  • "comprehensive plan grounded in a theory of change and fundamental beliefs."
  • Without a comprehensive plan that intentionally enacts the vision of learning and teaching, driven by a common vision and theory of change, professional learning will likely duplicate past efforts that have been inadequate, unfocused, and incoherent.
  • develop learning progressions for educators based on the defined theory of change and beliefs, and must differentiate and sustain professional learning as a natural part of educators' daily experience so that they achieve high levels of expertise.


Applying Standards not Unpacking Them


Rather than spending months or even a year unpacking the standards, teachers must engage in applying the standards in their classrooms and schools.

  • Teachers and principals collaborate within teams of peers that have skillful facilitation to employ constructivist, inquiry-based practices, close guidance and support from content and content-specific pedagogical experts, and coaching that provides a steady steam of evidence-based feedback. 
  • School, district, and state leaders provide the necessary support, time, technology, and other resources essential for teams to succeed. 
  • School leaders create a culture in which all staff members share collective responsibility, peer accountability, and commitment to continuous improvement to achieve student success.
A Focus on Implementation

With a clear focus on implementation, a fully developed theory of change and fundamental beliefs to guide a comprehensive plan for professional learning, adequate expert support, and the necessary conditions for success, professional learning will become a significant lever in producing the transformation in classroom practice and student success embedded in the new standards.



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District in preparation for #commoncore gives computer to every student

District in preparation for #commoncore gives computer to every student | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Next fall, students in the Trumann School District will be using new technology every day in school.


TRUMANN, AR (KAIT) – Next fall, students in the Trumann School District will be using new technology every day in class. According to Superintendent Myra Graham, who is in her first full year at Trumann, the district will lease-purchase approximately 1,700 MacBook Pro and Air computers and iPads for teachers and students. Graham said iPads will go to children in grades K-2. Students in grades 3-12 will be given laptop computers. Later grades will be able to take their devices home.


Graham said her aim is to get students ready to take the Common Core benchmark test in 2014. Arkansas is one of 43 states to join the Common Core State Standards Initiative. The CCSSI is an attempt to "level the playing field" among standards for students nationwide.


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