College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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Teaching Reading in the Digital Age

Teaching Reading in the Digital Age | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world ...
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Lauren's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:24 AM

Great thoughts for reading teachers 

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, August 7, 2013 2:29 PM

Earlier this summer, following a deep dive into the paradigm shifting models of design thinking and gamification in education at the annual conference of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE 2013), I found myself settling in to a week-long study of the time-tested, best-practices pedagogy at the Reading and Writing Institutes at Teachers College, Columbia University. It felt a bit like inhabiting one portion of my brain and then taking up residence in an entirely different thinking space – both equally valid to my professional life. Searching for a way to reconcile my learning, I am left wondering most about what it means to be a reader today.

Common Ground

The educational visionaries at ISTE, who call for creating a radically different learning environment for today’s self-directed learners, can find surprising common ground with some of the basic tenets of the Lucy Calkins approach to teaching reading (at least as I understand it as a first-year attendee of the Reading Institute).

For both, student choice remains central to learning, whether students are choosing the books they want to read from a classroom library or researching how to modify classroom furniture for a project employing design theory.Another crossover, the role of the teacher as coach who provides mini-lessons on learning strategies, might succeed as easily with a teacher seated at a chart and easel as with the digital-age teacher who uses short flipped lessons to deliver directed instruction.Innovators who tout the merits of gaming as a way to fire up students about their learning, for — ISTE keynoter Jane McGonigal, for instance — surely must recognize how the storytelling narrative sparks engagement in a gaming environment; likewise, the Reading Workshop method employs “leveling up” strategies familiar to gamers to move students through “leveled” classroom libraries that present offer more challenges and require greater sophistication as a students gain mastery of reading skills.

Digital Readers Reading

What, then, does this mean for those of us who teaching readers today? I am still searching for answers to questions that won’t let go of me.

The Reading Institute puts a lot of emphasis on “eyes on print” time – that is, on classroom time given over to readers engaged in the act of reading. This requires creating a culture of readers with books in their hands and sticky notes at the ready for jotting questions and tracking observations (leading to critical thinking). As a teacher who recognizes that students read in digital contexts as well, I find myself wondering if “eyes on text” (eyes on media?) might be a better term. Or is it even the same thing?  My students are constantly reading as oodles of different kinds of text-based media cross their paths. Don’t we need to prepare them with the nuanced skills required to read in every way possible?My students who use tablets or e-readers for reading time love the easy access to digital dictionaries. This frees them to engage with their reading even more deeply. Are they absorbing vocabulary more thoroughly and accurately than the students who are too lazy or too engrossed to open a dictionary? Digital readers do not necessarily preclude commenting on texts. Students with e-readers can certainly annotate their reading with digital comments. Is this any different from the kind of critical questioning students do with pen in hand?My goal is to teach my students to develop a passion for reading, but I also want them to use any effective means that can help them go beyond the surface in their reading. I also recognize the value in sharing their ideas with others. Is there something magical about the handwritten (and easily sharable) sticky note comment favored by the Reading Institute, or can my students do just as well (better?) with a sticky note app like Popplet?The Reading Institute went to great pains to introduce lessons about the reading of nonfiction, acknowledging a new pedagogical emphasis on nonfiction in the Common Core. As a result, considerable (though not exclusive) attention at the Institute was given over to using historical fiction in classroom libraries and as “anchor texts” for mini-lessons. I want to go further. I would venture that most students don’t know enough about the variety of nonfiction forms to know the difference between what is basically made up (fiction) or basically true (nonfiction) – in my experience, they tend to see everything they read in terms of story. Students need to be able to read an article online and identify it as a blog or a news story or a reference source. They need to recognize rhetorical strategies like comparison or illustration and understand how they affect a reader. As my section leader at the Reading Institute stated, students need to question perspective and bias in every kind of writing. I wonder, are we really doing enough to address these skills in our classes?Reading also represents an intersection of design, image, and text. The picture book, at its best, uses each avenue of communication to the fullest. So I am excited to follow the Reading Workshop method and return to picture books and image-rich texts (online or otherwise) as a means of teaching reading skills. I also like how the Reading Institute breaks down the skills needed to deconstruct a page and address the increasing complexity of the relationship of image to text, as this builds from mere illustration to direct contradiction. How can teachers of reading in a digital context build upon this work? At the same time, how might we all step back and consider more thoroughly the elements of design and their relationship to meaning?Reading for pure pleasure is certainly something we still want to nurture – whether the children we teach are “trapped” by an engaging story (as one of my rising sixth-graders put it on a recent discussion board about his summer reading) or whether they follow the meandering path of their burgeoning curiosity by skipping from website to website (we used to call this browsing when we did it in libraries or bookstores). Still, what are the ways we can encourage our students to extend their reading – yes, by reading for depth and understanding in a traditional sense, but also by accessing auxiliary information available to us online, by following hyperlinks to make more connections, or by engaging in a rousing backchannel chat?At the same time, we certainly also need to teach students how to handle the distractions of reading in a digital context, just as we help them mediate the distractions of an antsy classmate or a nearby whispered tutorial. How can we do this if we never allow them to read on their own devices and in ways that are second-nature to them?

A New Generation of Readers

After participating in these two very different learning venues, I went off the grid and experienced three delicious days of beach reading. I felt the pull of the stories like the tide, and I gave into where they took me. I want my students to feel that. But since I’ve come home, I’ve caught up on my Twitter feed, read my personal and work emails, and browsed for articles related to the topic of this blog post. This is the kind of reading my students will do – and already do – on a daily basis.

What does it really mean to teach reading in a digital age? It means teaching both ways and also in new ways. It means going back to school and learning to read along with our students, in a world in which we are surrounded by text from which we must derive meaning.

College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Supporting school leaders in helping all students become college and career-ready and to succeed in post-secondary education and training
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Implementing the Common Core State Standards: The Role of the School Leader Action Brief | Achieve

Implementing the Common Core State Standards: The Role of the School Leader Action Brief | Achieve | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

These Action Briefs for school leaders are a starting point, designed to increase awareness of the standards, create a sense of urgency around their implementation, and provide these stakeholders — who are faced with dramatically increased expectations in the context of fewer resources — with a deeper understanding of the standards and their role in implementing the standards. Achieve, in partnership with College Summit, the National Association of Secondary School Principals, and the National Association of Elementary School Principals, released this with support from MetLife Foundation.

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Is Text Complexity Is a 'Myth'?

Is Text Complexity Is a 'Myth'? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
In these audio clips, the author and retired professor discusses how background knowledge affects reading comprehension, why he thinks the common core's focus on reading complex texts is useless, and what education policymakers can learn from France.
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Actionable Feedback is Essential for Growth

Actionable Feedback is Essential for Growth | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Providing feedback is an art and as we continue to propel our students into independence, we need to carefully monitor where they are providing them the necessary steps like training wheels until they are ready to ride alone. Perhaps it's just the new buzz word of the moment or maybe it's the missing piece in how we make feedback more meaningful, but actionable feedback means not only identifying what needs improvement, but also offering a plan of action to make the necessary improvement possible.It's easy enough to tell a person what's wrong with their writing or a math set but it is a whole other thing to help them understand how to tackle the challenge and start to improve it. This is clearly more important than naming the problem.Too often in education we spend time naming problems rather solving them. We talk about what's wrong at length instead of living in solutions.Actionable feedback is where the solutions begin.There are lots of different ways of providing actionable feedback and depending on the age of the students and the content you're addressing, just make sure you're focusing on the how.
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Why Has Ed Tech Made So Little Difference?

Why Has Ed Tech Made So Little Difference? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Marc Tucker explores why educational technology has failed to deliver on its promises of raising student achievement. When I began my study of instructional technology in the early 1980s, I was convinced that digital technology could unleash an enormous improvement in learning for very large numbers of school children all over the world. I still think that. But that will not happen unless countries and states make very large investments in their teachers. Not, I might add, to teach them how to use technology. That will get us nowhere. Their lack of knowledge about how to use technology has never been the problem. It is their lack of deep knowledge about the doors that the technology can open that is the problem. Teachers will help young children develop an intuitive feel for the connections among algebraic formulas, abstract geometric forms and the rhythms of everyday life when teachers themselves understand those connections and see them in everyday life and marvel at them for their beauty and elegance. They will teach their students about the ubiquity of dynamic systems and the nature of their control when they themselves not only understand such systems and how they work but understand, too, the crucial role they play in the fabric of the lives we lead. Then they will be thinking like engineers, and that will enable them to help their students think like engineers. What I am describing is a very different kind of education—I am speaking of education, not training—than the kind that teachers ordinarily get. But this sort of change in their education is hardly all that is required. The whole curriculum must be rethought. And the standards to which that curriculum is set. And the way student performance is measured. And the things for which teachers will be held accountable. Only then will teachers be both able and willing to look at a brilliantly conceived piece of software that enables students to play with complex systems as a vital aid and not a distraction.
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Where Are Teachers Getting Their Common-Core Instructional Materials?

Where Are Teachers Getting Their Common-Core Instructional Materials? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
A new study found that teachers are mainly relying on homegrown instructional materials, created either by themselves or their district colleagues, to meet the Common Core State Standards.

Via Patrice Bucci
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Patrice Bucci's curator insight, February 12, 2016 11:16 AM

I have been saying this for a few years now... so much money has been wasted on "programs" that offer little in terms of quality materials... better off going to @ReadWorks, @newsela, @textproject!

#teachersknowbetter

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what to do with your individual PARCC score reports

what to do with your individual PARCC score reports | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

Wondering what to do with your individual PARCC score reports? You're invited to join outstanding teachers nationwide to dig into tools and teacher-tested strategies to help you elevate the PARCC conversation in your school community, classrooms and teams. By the end of our session, you will have:


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What the first round of test results say about Common Core progress

What the first round of test results say about Common Core progress | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
The Common Core standards raised expectations for students across the board. This fall, results are coming in for the first time, and in many places, they've been disappointing. John Tulenko of Education Week reports.
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Inspiring Students to Math Success and a Growth Mindset

Inspiring Students to Math Success and a Growth Mindset | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Common core based lesson plans and math tasks and ways to instill positive math beliefs. Easy to use in classrooms or home by teachers and parents.
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NAEP and Common-Core Math Show 'Reasonable' Overlap, Study Says

NAEP and Common-Core Math Show 'Reasonable' Overlap, Study Says | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
A new study looking at the relationship between the National Assessment of Educational Progress and the Common Core State Standards for mathematics finds that the two have "reasonable" overlap, but that the national test falls short on assessing some of the common standards. 

The study, commissioned by the NAEP Validity Studies Panel, an independent panel run by the American Institutes for Research, was published in advance of this week's release of the 2015 NAEP reading and math scores for 4th and 8th grade students. NAEP is administered to a nationally representative sample of students about every two years. 

The NAEP test was not designed to be aligned with any particular set of standards—it is meant to be used as a barometer of student achievement across the United States.
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How Common Core quietly won the war

How Common Core quietly won the war | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
The standards that naysayers love to call “Obamacore” have become the reality for roughly 40 million students.
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Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:48 PM

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GreatKids State Test Guide for Parents

GreatKids State Test Guide for Parents | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

New SBAC test results are in. Use this free tool to understand your child’s scores and see how your child is meeting the Common Core standards.


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Confusing Ohio test results are latest effort to unravel Common Core’s promise

Confusing Ohio test results are latest effort to unravel Common Core’s promise | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Advocates hoped to be able to compare student performance across state lines, but that’s still hard to do.
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Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:56 PM

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Neuroscience on what schools should stop doing

Neuroscience on what schools should stop doing | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Adolescent-brain science findings suggest four things that middle and high school teachers should stop doing, writes psychologist Thomas Armstrong. Findings from adolescent-brain research also suggest a number of things that educators should stop doing so much of at the middle school and high school levels. For example:• Classroom teaching that focuses largely on delivering content through lectures and textbooks fails to engage the emotional brain and leaves unchanged those prefrontal regions that are important in metacognition.• Public posting of grades and test scores (a practice which in this data-driven world appears to be increasing) humiliates and shames students in front of their highly valued peers.• Locking students into a set academic college-bound program of courses takes away their ability to make decisions about what most interests them (a process that integrates the limbic system's motivational verve with the prefrontal cortex's decisionmaking capacity).
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Graduation Gaps Closing

Graduation Gaps Closing | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Graduation rates topped 83 percent in the 2014-15 school year. High school graduation rates inched up for the fourth year in a row, by nearly one percentage point to 83.2 percent in the 2014-15 school year, the Obama administraton announced Monday. And while there are still significant graduation gaps between black, Hispanic, and Native American students and their white and Asian peers, those gaps are slowly closing.Graduation rates have now risen for students overall from 79 percent in the 2010-11 school year—the first year all states used the same method to calculate graduation rates. But over that same period graduation rates for black students rose even faster, by 7.6 percent. And graduation rates for Hispanic students grew by 6.8 percent. What's more, the rates for English-language learners, students in special education, and disadvantaged students also grew faster than for students overall.
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If Coaching Is So Powerful, Why Aren't Principals Being Coached?

If Coaching Is So Powerful, Why Aren't Principals Being Coached? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
If instructional coaching is beneficial to teachers, shouldn't leadership coaching benefical to principals? Why aren't more principals doing it? What about principals?If principals believe that teachers can benefit from high quality coaching, doesn't that mean that principals can as well? I wonder how many would engage in that type of professional development? Many times the school leader believes that they are supposed to know it all, which is quite possibly why they moved to the principalship. And some principals may believe coaching is for teaching and not for them, which is an interesting dilemma when it comes to who values coaching and why. If coaches are good for teachers, shouldn't coaching be valuable for leaders too?
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Rebecca Robles's curator insight, November 9, 2016 6:22 PM
It behooves administrators to participate in coaching training.  By observing through a coaches lens, a principal can effectively assess areas where teachers need support and provide that support.
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Standards-Based Learning: Why Do Educators Make It So Complex?

Standards-Based Learning: Why Do Educators Make It So Complex? | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
Educators have the odd habit of taking simple ideas and making them inexplicably complex. Standards based learning is one of them.
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18 Digital Tools and Strategies That Support Students’ Reading and Writing

18 Digital Tools and Strategies That Support Students’ Reading and Writing | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
The tech team in Littleton, Colorado is trying to build self-sufficiency in students by compiling digital tools for reading and writing that students can choose

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, August 23, 2016 4:48 PM
Mentions Rewordify, Screencastify, and more Chrome apps and web2.0 resources
Yeison Ossa Trejos's curator insight, August 31, 2016 2:42 PM
Reading and writing are skills that teachers, specially language teachers, need to develop in students. However, due to time constraints and lack of good feedback channels between learners and teachers, these activities may not have the expected results. For this reason, it is paramount for teachers to explore the varying digital tools that are available on the web to help students read and write more efficiently. I personally agree with the idea that having a set of these tools and sharing them with learners for them to chioose from the ones they consider fit their learning styles can be extremelly benefitial and encouraging as students get to see real improvements in their reading and writing performances and become more autonomous learners.
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Half of grads entering community college need help

Half of grads entering community college need help | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
New data shows about half of Illinois high school graduates going on to the state's community colleges need remediation in at least one subject.
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Nonfiction Reading Improved but Still Short of College Readiness Levels -- THE Journal

The amount of non-fiction read by students in grades 1-12 has steadily increased since the adoption of new learning standards introduced in the Common Core. Yet students — especially those in high school — don't read to the level of difficulty they should and fall "far short" of what may be required for college and career preparedness. At the same time, students who begin the school year behind their peers can make up for lost time with the right standards in place.

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Technology Integration to Drive Common Core Writing

Technology Integration to Drive Common Core Writing | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
If there are exceptions to Malcolm Gladwell’s rule, writing is surely one of them. Even after 10,000 hours, the process can still feel tedious, frustrating and lonely.Practice may not make perfect, but feedback and repetition can help students be more competent at writing. At least, that’s the hope
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Common Core's Big Test: Tracking 2014-15 Results

The 2014-15 school year marked a big change for many states because they switched to tests that for the first time reflect the Common Core State Standards.
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Gaming the System: Another state redefines ‘proficiency’ on Common Core tests, inflating performance

Gaming the System: Another state redefines ‘proficiency’ on Common Core tests, inflating performance | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it
The Arkansas decision doubled the number of Algebra I students considered proficient.
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Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:48 PM

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How to Create Failure and Destroy Public Education

Steven Singer, who teaches in Pennsylvania, explains the planned insanity behing standardized testing, rigged for failure. He likens the situation to a video game that he played with his friend as ...
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The Common Core Explained

The Common Core Explained | College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders | Scoop.it

The Common Core State Standards arose from a simple idea: that creating one set of challenging academic expectations for all students would improve achievement and college readiness.

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Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:56 PM

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