Common Core Online ELA
26 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Doctor Who Game Will Teach Kids How to Code - IGN

Doctor Who Game Will Teach Kids How to Code - IGN | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
"The idea is simply to use one of our biggest brands to inspire children to find out more about programming."

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

Pacifica School District Takes on Common Core By 'Transforming the Box'

Pacifica School District Takes on Common Core By 'Transforming the Box' | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
"The adoption of the Common Core State Standards has simply been a positive reinforcement of our direction of educating all our students." — Pacifica (Pacifica School District Takes on #commoncore By 'Transforming ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

Common Core Webinars

Webinars for the Common Core State Standards (RT! Next #AAHPERDCommonCore webinar is Tue, Jan 13th. All webinars are recorded and will be archived!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

MDE Report: “Smarter Balanced Only Viable Option” | Truth in ...

MDE Report: “Smarter Balanced Only Viable Option” | Truth in ... | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
Smarter Balanced is the only viable option. “Because Smarter Balanced was designed primarily by state assessment directors to understand these needs, this should not be a surprising result,” the report states.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

Common Core Unrest Obvious in 17 States - Huffington Post (blog)

Common Core Unrest Obvious in 17 States - Huffington Post (blog) | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
Common Core Unrest Obvious in 17 States Huffington Post (blog) Proponents of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are fond of saying that CCSS "has been adopted by 45 states and the District of Columbia." However, it seems that they refuse to...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Visit National Parks on Other Planets With These Fantastic Posters | Wired Science

Visit National Parks on Other Planets With These Fantastic Posters | Wired Science | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

Come see the ice geysers of Enceladus, the searing volcanoes of Io, or the secluded canyons of Mars! The wonders of the solar system have never looked so wonderful.

 

That’s the sense you get from looking at this fantastic collection of planetary posters from astronomer and artist Tyler Nordgren of the University of Redlands in California.

 

The posters manage to be futuristic and classic at the same time. Nordgren drew from a variety of sources for the illustrations: including 1930s Works Project Administration “See America” propaganda art, a vintage Air Afrique travel poster that can be seen in line at Disneyland’s Jungle Cruise ride, an old Pan Am advertisement for flights to tropical destinations that he has thumbtacked on his wall.

 

You can also clearly see the resemblance to vintage posters promoting the national parks. But mostly, Nordgren wants his work to show people the connection between the heavens and our own planet.

 

“All the things we find here on Earth – different landforms and geology – it’s the same on other planets and moons,” he said. “If we can explore the solar system there will be tremendous and amazing landscapes to see.”

 

Nordgren has always loved to draw and published a political comic strip during most of his time in college and graduate school. But at some point, he decided it would be easier to be a professional astronomer that does art on the side than the other way around.

 

Nordgren earned his Ph.D. and spent time researching dark matter and pulsating stars. After getting tenure, he looked for educational outreach opportunities. He started working with the National Parks Service, educating rangers on the night sky so they could in turn explain cosmic phenomena to park visitors.

 

“For most people today, the night sky is totally alien to them,” said Nordgren.

 

Click headline to read more and view pix gallery of the posters--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Sprint, Best Buy give students a free year of talk, text, and data | CNET News

Sprint, Best Buy give students a free year of talk, text, and data | CNET News | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

Hey students, your report card can now earn you a free cell phone plan. Best Buy and Sprint announced Monday that they've teamed up to offer free unlimited talk and text, plus 1GB of data, for one full year to students.

 

It works like this: Head to Best Buy between November 18 and January 4 and buy a new feature phone or smartphone at the Student Activated Price (the average phone price is $530), and activate it on a Sprint Unlimited, My Way plan. You'll need to pay for the cost of the phone, plus a $36 activation fee, taxes, and any other applicable fees.

 

Next, go to Sprint's student verification site within 14 days of your purchase to prove that you're a current student. One you're verified, your account will be credited for one year of unlimited talk and text, plus 1GB per month of data if you buy a smartphone, which Sprint says is a $70 per month value.

 

If 1GB of data isn't enough for your studying -- or let's be real, social media -- needs, you can pay $10 per month for unlimited data. You can also trade in your current phone to get a new handset with the offer. It's worth noting that you don't need to sign a two-year agreement for the student line. Lastly, students can get up to nine extra free years of service when a new line is added to the same account they're on.

 

Before you start thinking of ways to game the system, here's what you need to prove to Sprint that you're a student:

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Why I am one of the 75% of teachers supporting the Common Core

Why I am one of the 75% of teachers supporting the Common Core | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

Via Mel Riddile
more...
Susan Volinski's curator insight, December 2, 2013 11:03 AM

     This article presents the perspective of an elementary school teacher, Jessica Moore, from Boulder, CO, I read many articles about teachers arguing against the common core, so it was interesting to hear a perspective of a teacher who supports the common core stating that the curriculum is “good for kids and will help teachers be better educators.” She presents herself as a diverse woman who has worked with children ranging from gifted, to children with emotional and learning disabilities, to second language learners. Moore has had a positive experience with the common core curriculum because her students are asking more questions and are more engaged and interacted in the material being taught. Her whole argument by stating that teachers have more room for creativity and flexibility with the common core standards because they are broader. Personally, I disagree with her statement completely because from what I have seen so far with common core, it seems that there is a new set way of doing a problem, and students must follow the exact new method that was taught. For example, when I was observing my cooperating teacher for my university course – the math problem was along the lines of figuring out how many more candy canes one child had than the other. The teacher then explained the step by step way to solve this problem, by first making an array, then figuring out an equation, and then solving the problem with correct units in the answer. I feel that with the great number of requirements and materials teachers have to teach in such a short amount of time, there isn’t exactly much room for creativity and flexibility.

     Her perspective on common core as an international communication device was interesting: she stated that since all the states in US are under the common core standards, she was able to contact and communicate with teachers from other states to discuss what they were teaching because all being under the same curriculum, they should all be relatively synchronized in the material that they are covering. I wonder if this is a good idea though because different states have a different culture and environment and many lesson plans should be geared toward the students in that classroom.

Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

What is the biggest educational change promoted by the Common Core? Tim Shanahan

What is the biggest educational change promoted by the Common Core? Tim Shanahan | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

"The standard tells you the outcome that must be accomplished, but not everything that a student may need to learn to reach the goal is specified. That's where the teacher comes in… what do we need to teach to accomplish these standards? That is up to us."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Are we confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction?

Are we confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction? | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
Testing and teaching are not the same thing. Some educators are blurring the lines.

 

"As a profession, we are confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction. Many teachers strive, as I did, to insert “test-like” experiences within the context of their units to decrease the stand alone skills practice that high stakes testing often causes, but the truth is undeniable. We are increasingly blurring the lines between instruction (teaching and learning) and assessment of instruction (tests to measure teaching and learning)."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 8, 2013 11:55 PM

I so agree! Good points! Although schools must prepare students for taking assessments, assessment preparation and assessment results should not be mistaken for good teaching and/or actual student outcomes.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 11, 2013 6:40 AM

If I'm reading this article correctly, the author does call into question elements of the Common Core Assessment's questionable "side affects" while at the same time not condemning the the intent of assessment.

 

The author's question raises the valid point that there is a difference between instruction and assessment of that instruction. If instruction becomes test prep then test prep becomes the perceived importance of the content. And, in the case of literary reading, the "side effects" of this lack of distinction between what ought to be central and what has become central is perhaps seriously misdirecting student attentiveness. 

 

In my mind, this does not mean that assessment is unimportant and therefore ought to be abandoned. It means that we should be mindful that the purposes for literary reading are not the same as the purposes for attempting to measure the achievement of benefit derived from literary reading. And, if we are mindful of the distinction, then, as was the case for promoting "formative assessment structures," perhaps current literary assessment structures can evolve in such ways as to be less intrusive and thereby less likely to misdirect classroom practices that are more likely to divert students' attentiveness and engagement away from  the actual value of literary reading  and more likely to capture evidence that students' recognize the reasoning behind the advise provided to those who spend time exploring the wisdoms articulated across time and cultures by history's wisest spokespersons. Perhaps assessment structures can continue to evolve to a point where students will demonstrate understanding beyond merely being able to merely identify WHAT the themes are in a piece of great literature,, but also be able to demonstrate an understanding of WHY those themes are worth his or her engaged and serious contemplation.

 

I hope that my take is not Panglossian optimism about the potential for further improvement of the current state of literary reading assessment, but rather the optimism of people such as Martin Luther King who perceived a problem long inadequately unaddressed yet continued to believe, in spite of history's significant evidence to the contrary, that good things could still  be done to more successfully address issues of serious concern.

 

Or maybe Atticus Finch was just an old fool. 

 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Jefferson Hall IV's curator insight, September 7, 2015 5:38 PM

Teaching and the evaluation of teaching need to be further separated nationally in the United States. In my elementary, middle, and high school experiences, there has been too much emphasis placed on the estimation on how much students our learning rather that of what we are learning. Specifically, I can recall teachers giving us there examples of what a proficient and advanced essay should entail and forcing us to regurgitate that form time and time again for the soul purpose of meeting state standards. This process does not promote learning, insight, or originality. It deprives students of the chance to actually learn how to formulate their own well written essay. The author of this article, Mary Rudd, exclaims teaching the “habits of mind” through reading and writing to promote efficient learning. Using reading and writing to instigate critical thinking is very poignant to the learning process. Mary Rudd and her long standing career in education validate her credibility of this article.

Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Strategic Reading: What the Mind Needs to Do to Read Nonfiction

Strategic Reading: What the Mind Needs to Do to Read Nonfiction | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

By Nancy Akhavan

 

Many children are not strategic readers of nonfiction text; they dive into reading nonfiction the same way they approach a story or a novel. But if students are to become literate readers in a world filled with an abundance of information, they need to be good readers and strategic readers. Strategic readers

establish goals for reading;select reading strategies appropriate for the text they are reading;monitor their reading to determine if they are comprehending or not; andhave a positive attitude toward reading.
Via Mel Riddile
more...
Dyslexia Today's curator insight, November 10, 2013 8:13 PM

A good overview of what reading instruction really is, it is not about decoding text. When people argue that text to speech is not reading, we at Dyslexia Today argue that for a dyslexic it is all about getting to what this article is about. Learning about different types of text and how to handle each one.

Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Is There a War Between Fiction & Nonfiction?

Is There a War Between Fiction & Nonfiction? | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
As we stand at the Common Core buffet of reading, there seems to be a risk that we are going to force students to binge just for a better grade on a test, when we should be teaching them to try everything from the menu to help prepare them for...

Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Discussion: Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation

Discussion: Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

8 Tips for Speaking and Listening

While it is impossible to know all of the reasons, there is no doubt that learning to listen and talk is an extremely important way to broaden knowledge, enhance understanding and build community.


Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

The 7 Literacies of Transmedia Storytelling | Designer Librarian Blog

The 7 Literacies of Transmedia Storytelling | Designer Librarian Blog | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

Henry Jenkins defines transmedia storytelling as “a process where integral elements of a fiction get dispersed systematically across multiple delivery channels for the purpose of creating a unified and coordinated entertainment experience. Ideally, each medium makes it own unique contribution to the unfolding of the story.”

 

In transmedia storytelling, narrative is central to the story, which is told across multiple platforms, and may include sound, images, text, movie and gaming elements. The best part about it is that each of those elements plays an integral part of the narrative. And without experiencing all of those elements, you miss the full story. That’s what makes transmedia storytelling a powerful tool for 21st century literacy and learning.

 

In today’s literacy-rich world, I identified 7 different literacies that you’ll find within good transmedia storytelling projects (Inanimate Alice is an exemplary form, and includes all these literacies):

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

Achievethecore.org :: Home

Achievethecore.org :: Home | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
Find, steal, and share free Common Core tools. For teachers, coaches, school and district leaders. Assembled by Student Achievement Partners.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

Writing Rubrics for High School | Common Core S...

Writing Rubrics for High School | Common Core S... | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
These Common Core Writing Rubrics Help Teachers in All Subject Areas Identify and Score Good Writing, Bad Writing, and Everything in Between (RT @PrincipalDiff: Writing Rubrics for High School http://t.co/C7yA4z9xo9...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Rigor is NOT a Four-Letter Word: The Lexile Framework (linked to the Common Core)

Rigor is NOT a Four-Letter Word: The Lexile Framework (linked to the Common Core) | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

Guest Viewpoint: Common Core standards offer correct course for US schools - Elmira Star-Gazette

Guest Viewpoint: Common Core standards offer correct course for US schools Elmira Star-Gazette The CCLS were not developed by the federal government, but are part of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, a voluntary, state-led effort...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

Taking a Page from the Massachusetts' Common Core Playbook

Taking a Page from the Massachusetts' Common Core Playbook | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

Massachusetts shows what reforms are necessary to help students succeed.

 


Via Darren Burris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

“We Used to Do PLCs. Now We’re Doing Common Core?”

“We Used to Do PLCs. Now We’re Doing Common Core?” | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

When I look at the transition to Common Core, I see again a powerful structure to guide the work and answer the four key questions!

 
Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher

21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

Three Keys to Implementing the Common Core Standards

Three Keys to Implementing the Common Core Standards | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

In this post, we share three qualities that we think are paramount to good teaching, particularly good Common Core aligned instruction.


Via Darren Burris
more...
Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, November 18, 2013 8:47 AM

Critcal thinking, communication, and collaboration are the critical components.

Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Mastery vs. Coverage - Common Core Conundrum: Where's the Time to Scaffold?

Mastery vs. Coverage - Common Core Conundrum: Where's the Time to Scaffold? | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
Special educator Elizabeth Stein has been a champion of higher Common Core standards for her inclusion students but is beginning to question the relentless pace.

Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chesca Lynnette from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Resources and Downloads for Teaching Critical Thinking | Edutopia.org

Resources and Downloads for Teaching Critical Thinking | Edutopia.org | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it

Educators from the Bay Area's KIPP King Collegiate High School and the KIPP network have provided these resources for you to use in your own school.

 

Click headline to access hot links to resources and downloads--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chesca Lynnette
Scoop.it!

All Common Core Critics Aren’t Extreme | Truth in American Education

All Common Core Critics Aren’t Extreme | Truth in American Education | Common Core Online ELA | Scoop.it
Neal McClusky of The Cato Institute wrote an op/ed for The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that was published yesterday.  He pointed out that all Common Core critics are not extreme.  I appreciate his article because it seems as though those who advocate...
more...
No comment yet.