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To Make a Prairie: Providing Background Knowledge: Effective Scaffold or Spoon-feeding?

To Make a Prairie:  Providing Background Knowledge: Effective Scaffold or Spoon-feeding? | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

 

 

Two weeks ago I looked at one of the recommendations found in the Common Core Standards Publisher’s Criteria for Grades K-2 and 3-5, which attempt to lay out some guidelines for designing Standards-based reading curriculum. In addition to questioning strategy instruction, both Criteria also offer caveats against front-loading information or engaging students in pre-reading activities that provide them with access to a text’s ideas without actually grappling with the text itself.

 

 

In the end, I think it all comes down to purpose and what we want students ‘to get.’ If we want them to ‘get’ information about the Holocaust, there’s far more expedient ways to do that than reading a novel. But if we want them to get how readers construct an understanding of everything from the setting to the theme from the details the author provides, while also experiencing the power of narratives to move our hearts, not just our minds, we’d do better by teaching them the process of meaning making than by front-loading facts.

That’s the gift and enlightenment we can give to students—not facts, but the tools to make meaning.

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Curriculum 21: Common Core Crosswalks - LiveBinder

A Collection of Common Core Crosswalks from across the country.

 

Side by Side comparisons of Oklahoma PASS and CCSS 

 

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How Common Core will change testing in schools - Washington Post

How Common Core will change testing in schools -  Washington Post | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

The Answer Sheet:  article from Stephen Krashen:  At first glance, the assessments now being developed to accompany the Common Core State Standards do not appear to be much more than we already have, at least in terms of subject-matter covered and grade level.

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Potentially Helpful Resource: Engage the Common Core | Engaging Educators

Potentially Helpful Resource: Engage the Common Core | Engaging Educators | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

ISTE presentation from Ben Curran:  "Spoiler alert! In this slideshow I give away some of my most top-secret ways of digging up information about the Common Core!!!"

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Will Common Core National Assessments Motivate Students to Enjoy & Appreciate School? | Teaching the Core

Will Common Core National Assessments Motivate Students to Enjoy & Appreciate School? | Teaching the Core | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

Regardless of how good or bad the latest high-stakes tests are, teachers will always be the key motivators in public school settings.

 

 

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Trello - Welcome Board

Trello is a network for sharing and managing workflows. In one glance, a Trello board tells you what's being worked on, who's working on what, and how close they are to being done.

 

Requires registration but free.  Use as teachers collaborate on CC standards and specific lessons.

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Reading Informational Texts Using the 3-2-1 Strategy - ReadWriteThink

Reading Informational Texts Using the 3-2-1 Strategy - ReadWriteThink | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

Students can count on using the 3-2-1 strategy to help them successfully comprehend and write about an informational text.

Grades K-2--I question this grade placement as I would use this with my 3rd grade.   (3 lessons) printables and web links for NF text.

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CONFLICTS?? CONTEXT AND CLOSE READING - Partner in Education

CONFLICTS?? CONTEXT AND CLOSE READING  -  Partner in Education | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it
This summer, issues surrounding the Common Core Standards have been like a spiraling vortex in my mind. Each week as I facilitate a new group of educators through the standards (which by the way, f...

 

Can we not look at the literature, conduct a close reading of a text based on what we know about close reading and then use that text to draw conclusions or inferences about the time in which it was written or about the voice behind the text, whether that be the author or not? I would argue to assume that context must precede close reading is to imply that the given text has no autonomy when removed from the contributing factors that brought it into being.

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What Are We Asking Students and Why: Exploring the Difference Between a Prompt and a Scaffold - To Make a Prairie

What Are We Asking Students and Why: Exploring the Difference Between a Prompt and a Scaffold  -  To Make a Prairie | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

This doesn’t, of course, mean that we shouldn’t ask questions. But if we truly want our students to be independent meaning makers, we need to think about what we’re asking and how we can craft questions that are open-ended enough for students to find their own way into a text and are framed in a way that makes them transferable from one text to another. And here’s where I think it’s useful to explore the difference between a prompt and a scaffold.

 

 The question leads students to notice what the teacher (or in this case the Exemplar writer) has noticed and to draw the same conclusion from that detail that he or she did. It also anticipates what some students might miss (that this is, in fact, a slave narrative), and it seeks to ‘correct’ that by directing those students to the title in a way that solves a problem for the students rather than letting them solve it themselves as they keep on reading. The question also does nothing to teach the thinking around the text in a way that might be transferable to other similar texts, all of which makes it a prompt.

A scaffold, on the other hand, teaches the thinking around the text by offering students some instruction on how texts like this generally operate and what readers do because of that, along with a more open-ended invitation to notice what there is be noticed and consider what that might mean. That kind of scaffolded question, introduced by what I call a teaching point, could look and sound like this:

 

 

All of this makes me think that the difference between a prompt and a scaffold is a bit like the old Chinese proverb: Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. Give a student a prompt and he feeds you an answer. Teach a student through a scaffold and you build a close reader—often for a lifetime.

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Taking the Plunge into Nonfiction -- - To Make a Prairie

Taking the Plunge into Nonfiction -- - To Make a Prairie | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

It’s true that when I look at the books on my shelves and the stack on my nightstand, fiction outnumbers nonfiction by more than ten to one. That’s because fiction feeds my soul like nothing else I know of.

 

Before we revise how we teach nonfiction, let’s develop a deeper, more complex vision of what it really is, so we know more precisely what our instruction needs to aim for in order to better hit the mark.

 

Next post on HOW of reading nonfiction.

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Choice Literacy - Common Core Conversations: Reading in the Disciplines

Choice Literacy - Common Core Conversations: Reading in the Disciplines | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

The Common Core Standards demand that the building of knowledge through reading text plays a fundamental role in those disciplines. In history and social studies, the analysis of primary and secondary documents is a core part of building knowledge. And in science, the analysis of reference materials, direct experimental result, debate obviously integrated with other data, but reading sufficiently complex text at the heart of it. To give you a sense of how different this is from what happens today, we have evidence that in kindergarten through 5th grade kids read informational text 7% of the time.

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How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful? - editopia

How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful?  -  editopia | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

I think meaningful assessments can come in many shapes and sizes. It fact, to be thoroughly engaging and to draw the best work out of the students, assessments should come in different formats.

 

Good article--compare assessment to the four C's.  Utilize rubrics. 

 

My bottom line:  The key here, however, is to assess everyday.  Not in boring, multiple-choice daily quizzes, but in informal, engaging assessments that take more than just a snapshot of a student's knowledge at one moment in time.

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Defining (and realising) common core standards in education - Future-Proof Learning

Defining (and realising) common core standards in education - Future-Proof Learning | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

National Education Association (NEA) has recently developed An Educator’s Guide to the “Four Cs” to address the challenges of preparing 21st century students for a global society....Yet clarifying what students should be learning does not necessarily translate into higher achievement in the classroom.

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Shifts for Students and Parents | EngageNY

Shifts for Students and Parents | EngageNY | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

Good resource--23 page pdf to explain CCSS to parents and students.


Via Ann Marie Palmer, Brook Grove Meiller
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How to Differentiate a Lesson - ReadWorks.org

How to Differentiate a Lesson - ReadWorks.org | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

Differentiation is designing and implementing curriculum, instructional strategies, and assessments that are responsive to the needs, background, interests, and abilities of students.

3 ways to differentiate the K-6 lessons

6 rules of Differentiating

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SeeMath - Free Math Animations

Clear explanations in professional-quality animations perfect for the interactive whiteboard or data projector. Number topics include: decimals, fractions, base ten blocks, ratios. Algebra topics include: equations, simplification.
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English/Language Arts Instructional Pacing Guide k-12 from Tennessee

ELA Instructional Pacing Guide k-12 #ccss #commoncor


Via Darren Burris, Greg McVerry
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Oolone.com visual search engine. Open your eyes to the web.

Oolone.com visual search engine. Open your eyes to the web. | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

The Oolone visual search engine allows you to search the web by viewing the resulting websites as images before visiting them.

 

Good for visual learners. 

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Skoolbo | Skoolbo Core Skills | Skoolbo

Skoolbo | Skoolbo Core Skills | Skoolbo | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it
Skoolbo Core Skills is the world’s largest educational game ever! Skoolbo is a literacy and numeracy program with more than 50,000 questions designed to assist 4 to 10 year olds in their journey to mastery of essential reading and mathematics skills.
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Conversations on Close Reading and the Common Core State Standards - Partner in Education

Conversations on Close Reading and the Common Core State Standards  -  Partner in Education | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

Over the last several weeks, I have had the most interesting conversations with knowledgeable minds about close reading: the history of close reading; the nature of texts demanding close reading; ...

 

As educators of varied disciplinary content, the CCSS has challenged us all to become teachers of close reading. Therein lies an implicit challenge to teachers, intellectual repositories of knowledge, histories, and stories: we must become readers ourselves who have evolved into close readers. In so doing, we must take the advice of Pearson and not become divorced of knowledge. However, we need replace our preoccupations with historical background, sociological demographics, and archaic vocabularies that further remove young readers from studying the vitality of the words, the art of text construction, and resultant text messages. The purpose of close reading should not be a function in itself but in developing appreciation for the universal and timeless value innate to complex texts and worthy of the classroom investment.

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Applying the Process of Meaning Making to Nonfiction: A Look at Comprehension -- To Make a Prairie

Applying the Process of Meaning Making to Nonfiction: A Look at Comprehension --  To Make a Prairie | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

In What Readers Really Do, Dorothy Barnhouse and I break down the work of meaning making into three strands or modes of thinking: comprehension, understanding and evaluation.  We define comprehension as the literal and inferential sense a reader makes of a text line by line and page by page. Understanding, by comparison, happens when a reader takes what she’s comprehended on each page to draft and revise her sense of a text’s bigger ideas or themes. And evaluation occurs when a reader critiques a text and/or considers what personal or social value it has for him.

 

The challenge for us, as teachers, is in letting students wrestle with this, trading ideas and going back to the text to look for evidence and clues, instead of intervening in order to clear their confusion up. Letting students wrestle with the text like this engages them in what my math colleagues sometimes call a “productive struggle.”

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Timed Tests and the Development of Math Anxiety - Education Week

Timed Tests and the Development of Math Anxiety -  Education Week | Common Core Oklahoma | Scoop.it

Timed math tests can transform children's brains, leading to low math achievement even among highly capable students, writes Jo Boaler.

 

There is no disagreement about the goal, but policies that require the testing of young children under timed conditions may be inadvertently achieving the opposite. Assessments for the common core could break or perpetuate this cycle of damage. Let’s hope they do the former.

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