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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

By Ferris Jabr

 

"How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—to anyone who routinely switches between working long hours in front of a computer at the office and leisurely reading paper magazines and books at home; to people who have embraced e-readers for their convenience and portability, but admit that for some reason they still prefer reading on paper; and to those who have already vowed to forgo tree pulp entirely. As digital texts and technologies become more prevalent, we gain new and more mobile ways of reading—but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly? How do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper? Should we be worried about dividing our attention between pixels and ink or is the validity of such concerns paper-thin?"


Via Jim Lerman, Jonathan Jarc
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

I loved the part about mind mapping and the meta-cognitive things we do before we start reading. Great article with research-based facts.

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Gordon Shupe's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:19 AM
I will admit it, I have yet to read an entire novel or non-fiction book (of over a 100 pages) on an electronic device. But that is partly because I don't typically read novels and the non-fiction topics that I am interested in are not yet available in electronic form. But I have read (and do read) comprehend and 'know' a small library's worth of information over the last few years in smaller chunks from the screen of my various devices. I agree with the research and acknowledge the continued need for printed reading skills and materials. But I would also point out that these two formats should not be mutually exclusive, but rather are complimentary. Reading, managing, recalling, citing, validating digital text is quite different from printed text. It may be that printed text is preferable given a certain history/experience/purpose/ or skill set. But there are just as many advantages to electronic texts, and maybe we need to address them as two different important literacies as educators. It reminded me of comments I made when the iPad first came out: http://www.shupester.com/files/iPadDifferent.php iOS / iPad not 'better' but 'good different'?
Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:32 AM

I think that, given time, our brains will adapt. The generation now in primary school are hardwiring their brains from toddlerhood. But for older readers, my own experience is that while the screen grabs the brain and gets me reading, I don't necessarily read attentively.

It might also increase differences between poor and wealthy as those with access to multiple devices may develop differently to those without. But the jury is still out as to who will have the advantage.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, December 30, 2013 3:23 PM

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/11/so-the-internets-about-to-lose-its-net-neutrality ... http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com - http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins

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Reading & Writing at SRHS
High school level resources for technology & reading and writing fluency
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Kurt Vonnegut's Shapes of Stories in infographic form

Kurt Vonnegut's Shapes of Stories in infographic form | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
A nice infographic by Maya Eilam. She's going to offer this as an 11 x 17 print! (Via This isn't Happiness)
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Fascinating! Western stories can really be put into just 4 of the shapes! 

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200 Prompts for Argumentative Writing - NYTimes.com

200 Prompts for Argumentative Writing - NYTimes.com | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Wonderful list of writing prompts. Make sure students use evidence to support their position.

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E-book sales are leveling off. Here’s why.

E-book sales are leveling off. Here’s why. | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
E-book sales are rising only slowly now. Here's what that has to do with the future of the written word.
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Best quote: "We may be discovering that e-books are well suited to some types of books (like genre fiction)  but not well suited to other types (like nonfiction and literary fiction) and are well suited to certain reading situations (plane trips) but less well suited to others (lying on the couch at home)."

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Infographic: “How Does the Act of Writing Affect Your Brain?”

Infographic: “How Does the Act of Writing Affect Your Brain?” | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
  via larryferlazzo.edublogs.org

Via Nancy Jones
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Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 19, 2013 9:28 AM

I find the information in this fascinating. Would be interesting to share not only with colleagues, but with learner s as well.

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Plagiarism & the New Digital Frontier from Jen Carey | Leading Change in Changing Times

Plagiarism & the New Digital Frontier from Jen Carey | Leading Change in Changing Times | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

Teaching students to do real, meaningful research not only combats plagiarism, it also makes them better students and critical thinkers. These are the 21st century skills that will serve them throughout life. It will also help to limit those conversations we have all had with a child that turns in work that is not their own. By teaching students how to effectively navigate content of all types, we are promoting academic integrity as well as necessary, real world skills.

Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

We developed a plagiarism lesson for Sophomores using libguides here: http://srhs.sau17.libguides.com/content.php?pid=260237&sid=3108177

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A little bird told me...

A little bird told me... | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

Fiona Milburn:  "As a creative practitioner, you're probably familiar with twitter as a key social media platform for marketing your projects to today’s internet-savvy audiences.But did you know it’s also a great storytelling tool?"


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Shwetal Randive's curator insight, May 5, 2013 3:38 AM

Creative uses of Twitter - A storytelling tool

Marci Segal, MS's curator insight, May 5, 2013 8:24 AM

Educators using twitter with students?  Ya think?

Mervi Rauhala's curator insight, May 6, 2013 2:16 PM

If you like Twitter and storytelling, read this!

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Why fiction is good for you How fiction changes your world - The Boston Globe

Why fiction is good for you How fiction changes your world - The Boston Globe | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
We spend huge chunks of our lives immersed in novels, films, TV shows, and other forms of fiction. Some see this as a positive thing, arguing that made-up stories cultivate our mental and moral development.
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Notes From Educon Session: Crowdsourcing The Death Of The Textbook | FunnyMonkey

Notes From Educon Session: Crowdsourcing The Death Of The Textbook | FunnyMonkey | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

I'll be happy to see the death of the Social Studies/English textbook!

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The e-reading advantage - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog

The e-reading advantage - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
Last month, Ryan Bretag wrote about an experiment in his school where students, often reluctant to...
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Who will create the perfect e-textbook?

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Lab Lit: Writing Fiction Based on Real Science | NY Times Learning Network

Lab Lit: Writing Fiction Based on Real Science | NY Times Learning Network | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

By Alison Fromme, Jennifer Cutraro and Katherine Schulten

Summary by Accomplished Teacher

 

"Lessons in English and science can go hand in hand through the genre of "lab lit," offer the writers of this blog post. In one suggested exercise, students would discuss recent science topics and determine how they might be used as the basis for a novel or movie. In another exercise, students examine the novel "Frankenstein," which is cited in an accompanying article as probably one of the earliest examples of "lab lit," and the authors also suggest studying scientists' blogs."


Via Jim Lerman
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101 Excellent Sites for English Educators

101 Excellent Sites for English Educators | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

A list of the top 101 websites for English & Language Arts (ELA) chosen by real teachers from prominent LinkedIn groups.


Via Steven Engravalle, Lori Johnson, Jim Lerman
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Rescooped by Pam Colburn Harland from iPads in Education
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The 2011 CYBILS Literary Awards – Seven iPad Book Apps to Make the Cut | The Digital Media Diet

The 2011 CYBILS Literary Awards – Seven iPad Book Apps to Make the Cut | The Digital Media Diet | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

"Book apps have been around since the iPhone launched apps in 2008, although it wasn’t until the larger screen option with the iPad in 2010 that they really caught fire in the book blogging community."


Via John Evans
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Does reading actually change the brain? - Futurity

Does reading actually change the brain? - Futurity | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
After reading a novel, actual changes linger in the brain, at least for a few days, report researchers.
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Fascinating article about changes to your brain after you read.

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Study: Novel Reading Generates Sustained Boost in Neural Connectivity

Study: Novel Reading Generates Sustained Boost in Neural Connectivity | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
A new study out of Emory University offers evidence that reading novels is more than just high-level entertainment. It also appears to be good for your brain.
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Keep reading those novels!

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For Better Social Skills, Scientists Recommend a Little Chekhov

For Better Social Skills, Scientists Recommend a Little Chekhov | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
A new study found that reading literary fiction leads to better performance on tests of empathy, social perception and emotional intelligence.
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Wow! I love the blend of literature and science in this article!

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The RSC's digital Midsummer Night's Dream: lunatic or inspired?

The RSC's digital Midsummer Night's Dream: lunatic or inspired? | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
Dominic Cavendish explains how a real-time, digital reimagining of Shakespeare's play will take place in Stratford and around the worldwide web this weekend.

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

The whole project blows my mind!

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, June 22, 2013 3:52 AM

Guess what I'm going to be doing this weekend?

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, June 22, 2013 12:31 PM

Whoa!  

"In a ground-breaking initiative called Midsummer Night’s Dreaming, delivered in substantial part by Google’s creative division, the action will primarily be experienced at one digital remove through a dedicated website – dream40.org – which has already gone live. This site will anticipate, comment on and followShakespeare’s action – as enacted largely unseen by the RSC cast – using specially devised materials, whether it be tweets, animations or other postings, and will draw too on material supplied by the online world. In other words, it will be the buzz around the events – some of it generated by 35 ancillary characters, specially created for the occasion – that takes centrestage."


My favorite piece so far is Justin Snout's sound cloud poetry 

https://soundcloud.com/justin-snout-1/ ; :-)

Lindsey Carroll's curator insight, June 24, 2013 3:34 PM

anything that speads the work of Skakespeare must be good in my opinion.

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How To Google Search By Reading Level

How To Google Search By Reading Level | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
How To Google Search By Reading Level: google, search, lexile, literacy, reading level
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Great step-by-step instructions. I'm going to share this with my faculty.

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Top 10 Characteristics Of Effective Vocabulary Instruction

Top 10 Characteristics Of Effective Vocabulary Instruction | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

We know that there is a strong relationship between vocabulary and reading comprehension. Systematic vocabulary instruction is an integral part of a K-12 comprehensive literacy framework for instruction. I consider it a privilege to have supported many teachers, coaches, & administrators in building a community that values word learning across classrooms and content areas.

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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

By Ferris Jabr

 

"How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—to anyone who routinely switches between working long hours in front of a computer at the office and leisurely reading paper magazines and books at home; to people who have embraced e-readers for their convenience and portability, but admit that for some reason they still prefer reading on paper; and to those who have already vowed to forgo tree pulp entirely. As digital texts and technologies become more prevalent, we gain new and more mobile ways of reading—but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly? How do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper? Should we be worried about dividing our attention between pixels and ink or is the validity of such concerns paper-thin?"


Via Jim Lerman, Jonathan Jarc
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

I loved the part about mind mapping and the meta-cognitive things we do before we start reading. Great article with research-based facts.

more...
Gordon Shupe's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:19 AM
I will admit it, I have yet to read an entire novel or non-fiction book (of over a 100 pages) on an electronic device. But that is partly because I don't typically read novels and the non-fiction topics that I am interested in are not yet available in electronic form. But I have read (and do read) comprehend and 'know' a small library's worth of information over the last few years in smaller chunks from the screen of my various devices. I agree with the research and acknowledge the continued need for printed reading skills and materials. But I would also point out that these two formats should not be mutually exclusive, but rather are complimentary. Reading, managing, recalling, citing, validating digital text is quite different from printed text. It may be that printed text is preferable given a certain history/experience/purpose/ or skill set. But there are just as many advantages to electronic texts, and maybe we need to address them as two different important literacies as educators. It reminded me of comments I made when the iPad first came out: http://www.shupester.com/files/iPadDifferent.php iOS / iPad not 'better' but 'good different'?
Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:32 AM

I think that, given time, our brains will adapt. The generation now in primary school are hardwiring their brains from toddlerhood. But for older readers, my own experience is that while the screen grabs the brain and gets me reading, I don't necessarily read attentively.

It might also increase differences between poor and wealthy as those with access to multiple devices may develop differently to those without. But the jury is still out as to who will have the advantage.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, December 30, 2013 3:23 PM

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/11/so-the-internets-about-to-lose-its-net-neutrality ... http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com - http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins

Rescooped by Pam Colburn Harland from learning21andbeyond
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Remixing Melville: Moby Dick Meets the Digital Generation | MindShift

Remixing Melville: Moby Dick Meets the Digital Generation | MindShift | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
In a traditional English class, a teacher might assign Herman Melville’s famous novel Moby Dick in small chunks. Students might complete their reading (

Via Nancy Jones
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

Deep reading and reading flows are both mentioned here.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 9, 2013 9:37 AM

This is an interesting example of out of the box thinking and student led riven learning. Links to an online book explaining their approach is included in the article too

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Educon: Unraveling the Textbook

It's been a week since returning from Educon1 and, although I have managed to read a few of the wonderful reflections written by others, I'm just now sifting through my notes and thoughts about the...
Pam Colburn Harland's insight:

I especially like the idea of not replacing print textbooks with e-textbooks, but getting rid of textbooks alltogether. 

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Bringing Students to Life With Memoir Writing

Bringing Students to Life With Memoir Writing | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
Writing teachers are uniquely poised to facilitate life-altering experiences for students by encouraging them to write their stories, says teacher Greg Graham.
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The complete Hobbit guide

The complete Hobbit guide | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it

NZ Herald:  "When JRR Tolkien wrote The Hobbit he created a world of almost overwhelming scale and a vast and varied cast of characters" ...


Graphic by Claudia Ruiz


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Quarter of U.S. Adults Consider Themselves E-Book Readers, According to New Report | Digital Book World

Quarter of U.S. Adults Consider Themselves E-Book Readers, According to New Report | Digital Book World | Reading & Writing at SRHS | Scoop.it
[Press Release] E-Book User Base Expands to 24.5% of Adult Population Simba Information, the market research firm specializing in publishing and media,...

Via Buffy J. Hamilton
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