Common Core ELA_L...
Follow
Find
7.8K views | +2 today
 
Rescooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
onto Common Core ELA_Literacy
Scoop.it!

More states are taking middle-of-the-road approaches toward the #CommonCore

More states are taking middle-of-the-road approaches toward the #CommonCore | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
Revising Common Core could calm many concerns and still lead to high standards, one expert says.

 

"These types of bills, Smarick says, could lead to the best outcome for the Common Core initiative in the long-run."


Via Mel Riddile
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Reviewing the Common Core Standards and making edits or additions as necessary based on the input of a knowledgeable citizenry is prudent, but is that the process or are the changes being made as knee-jerk reactions to political pressure and election fear? I don't really know...but from the headlines, the latter seems to be playing a hefty role in Common Core backlash.

more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:43 AM

States always had the option of adding up to 15% to the Standards, but many chose to adopt the CCSS as is. Now, they are doing the right thing by personalizing the Standards to the needs of students in their states.

Common Core ELA_Literacy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Grading the Common Core: No Teaching Experience Required

Grading the Common Core: No Teaching Experience Required | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
Testing groups point to strict training and criteria for Common Core grading, but the use of temps for increasingly complex tests is being questioned.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

I'm weighing in here...in my opinion, scoring Common Core assessments shouldn't require teaching experience. A college degree and assessment training is sufficient for scorers to effectively score student work. Instructional pedagogy and/or a background in education has nothing to do with using a rubric in order to precisely evaluate student work. Doctors aren't in pharmacies overseeing the process of prescriptions being filled; engineers don't work onsite as homes are built, roads are constructed or vehicles maintained. These labors are carried out be those trained to follow prescriptive guidelines and make educated decision as needed.  I agree, it would be beneficial for teachers' own edifications if they participated in the scoring of Common Core assessments, but students are not being put at risk or undervalued because their work is being evaluated by college grads who are not teacher certified.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Rich Sources of Curated Open Educational Resources – High Quality, Current, and Free | Extreme Networks

Rich Sources of Curated Open Educational Resources – High Quality, Current, and Free | Extreme Networks | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
The Extreme Networks survey on open educational resources (OER) shows that high-quality, openly licensed learning materials are improving the educational
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Yep! Open Education Resources (OER) will be taking educators to places they hadn't imagined...and those places will be materials for curriculum designed and tested by teachers not merely textbook publishers. There is room in the marketplace for both. Our nation's schools and our teachers are diverse. Though we can share a set of standards, the materials that will drive us to success in meeting those standards need be designed within the reach of our resources with a design customized to reach our teaching and & learning populations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Years into Common Core, teachers lament lack of materials

Years into Common Core, teachers lament lack of materials | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

"The learning standards were new. The textbooks were not.


"So curriculum director Tammy Baumann and her team took the books apart, literally. Then they rearranged lessons, filled in holes with outside material and put it all together in what will be the K-2 math curriculum in the fall at her district in East Lansing, Michigan.

It was a time-consuming but necessary response, Baumann said, to what appears to be a near-universal lament of teachers as they page through textbooks and websites: a lack of high-quality teaching materials aligned to the Common Core Learning Standards that have been adopted by most states.


“We literally created our own curriculum ... essentially creating it from scratch — creating the homework, creating the student achievement challenges,” Baumann said at the end of a school year spent collecting feedback and refining the materials.

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

As a reviewer of alignment between the newest ELA programs/textbooks and Common Core,  I can attest to the continuing gaps between the expectations of the standards and the letter of the programs. I continue to find too much teacher talk as explanation over the content of the standards and not enough student demonstration of proficiencies with those standards. Publishers have come a long way, but the strategy that Tammy put to work is one more schools , tied to textbooks, should practice. Yes, the work may seem daunting but the reward exceeds the demands on time and talent.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Interdisciplinary Assessment: Combining Literacy, Science, and Mathematics

Interdisciplinary Assessment: Combining Literacy, Science, and Mathematics | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

"Every class at BCCS ends the year with a final. This year, I decided to try something different—instead of a paper and pencil test, students would complete tasks modeled off the Next Generation Science Standards sample tasks. The goal was for the final to reflect students’ ability to do science rather than their ability to memorize facts and by using their science knowledge in various ways improve their understanding and retention of the facts.


"The NGSS tasks combine science, math and literacy standards. By switching to a task final, the assessment in and of itself reflects the interdisciplinary nature of science and gives students a chance to review math skills for their math final. In designing the tasks I collaborated with Ms. Adam, the 6th Grade math teacher, who helped revise the tasks to ensure that the math was an appropriate level of rigor and that scaffolding was in place for all students to be successful.

"

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

As we move deeper into 21st Century Learning Standards and assessment, whether through Common Core, C3 Framework, or Next Gen Science, we see the interdependence of literacy skills on growth in communication, intellect, innovation, creativity, and general academic well-being. Anywhere we can help teachers and/or students see the transfer of knowledge and skills from one discipline to another or the transfer of that relevance to life is an opportunity to move the horizon of human landscape forward continually advancing the boundaries of what might be.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Lessons from the principal of a Kentucky school that went from one of the worst to one of the best under Common Core - The Hechinger Report

Lessons from the principal of a Kentucky school that went from one of the worst to one of the best under Common Core - The Hechinger Report | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
When results from Kentucky’s first round of Common Core aligned testing came out in 2011, Southside Elementary School in Lee County, like most schools, found itself looking at grim numbers. Pass rates went from 73 percent to 46 percent in reading and 62.5 percent to 27 percent in math. Based on those scores, and some …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Common Core's first breakout hit? | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute

Common Core's first breakout hit? | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

"Much of my enthusiasm for Common Core has been predicated on the assumption that raising our game on teaching and testing can’t be accomplished without taking a long, hard look at curriculum—the course content and class materials we put in front of students. Curriculum is largely beyond the reach of Common Core; it’s strictly (and correctly) a local concern. But it’s been widely hoped the new standards would create a robust nationwide market for innovative new materials—especially in English language arts (ELA), where Common Core explicitly states the standards “must be complemented by a well-developed, content-rich curriculum.”

"In the main, it hasn’t happened. Five years into Common Core implementation, 90 percent of school districts report that they are still struggling to find the materials they need to meet the new standards. On the one hand, this is not entirely surprising. Curriculum has long been the neglected stepchild of education reform, and building new materials takes time. However, not long ago, a study by the Brookings Institution’s Russ Whitehurst demonstrated that curriculum has an even greater effect on student outcomes than most popular policy levers, including charter schools, teacher quality, preschool programs, and even standards themselves.

"In short, improving curriculum is almost certainly the last, best, juiciest piece of low-hanging fruit left in our efforts to improve student outcomes."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

More and more Common Core curriculum is being designed on a daily basis. This weekend, I am working with Achieve and Student Achievement Partners as they support teaches from across the country in developing Common Core aligned units for specific, targeted standard clusters often overlooked by both existing publishers and commercial online resources. Additionally, OER will be soon be revealing the award winners of their curriculum writing RFP and those resources should begin to become available after the first of the year, 2016. Yes, this seems like a long time in-waiting. But good things come to those who wait.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Parent Engagement on Rise as Priority for Schools, Districts

Parent Engagement on Rise as Priority for Schools, Districts | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
As districts adopt formal efforts to integrate parents into the fabric of their schools, advocates welcome a shift away from seeing parent-engagement efforts as just an add-on.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

I've often thought that if we had brought parents into the schools during the early days of the Common Core transition, perhaps we wouldn't be experiencing the push-back of opt-out movements and standards questioning. Parents feel threatened by the changes to education, especially when the conventional ways of teaching and learning, the methods that brought them to this point educationally, are being modified and in some cases, totally obliterated for more rigorous teaching and learning. In some schools, this idea of parent involvement is merely a check-off--yes we have an open house. But as you can read in this article, for many schools and some states, the initiative is much stronger and paying off!!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Thousands of Scorers Take On the Common-Core Tests

Thousands of Scorers Take On the Common-Core Tests | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

42,000 people will be scoring 109 million student responses to questions on the two exams, which were designed by two groups of states—the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC—to gauge mastery of the common core. That unprecedented scoring project is testing the capacity of the assessment industry and fueling debate about what constitutes a good way of measuring student learning.

The scoring process is typically shrouded in secrecy, but Pearson, which is training scorers for PARCC states, as well as administering and scoring the test, permitted a rare visit to one of its 13 regional scoring centers, in a nondescript brick office building outside Columbus.

When these men and women complete their training, they'll take a qualifying exam designed to demonstrate that their scoring consistently falls within the ranges that Pearson and educators from PARCC have agreed upon.

Smarter Balanced has a more decentralized way of training scorers, since each state using that test chooses its own vendor to administer and score the test, and train raters. While Pearson requires PARCC scorers to hold bachelor's degrees, for instance, Smarter Balanced lets each state set its own minimum requirements, said Shelbi K. Cole, the deputy director of content for Smarter Balanced.

California offers an example: Through its contractor, the Educational Testing Service, the state is hiring only scorers who have bachelor's degrees, though they can be "in any field," according to an ETS flyer. Teaching experience is "strongly preferred," but not required. Certified teachers, however, must be paid $20 per hour to score, while non-teachers earn $13 per hour. As of late April, only 10 percent of the scorers hired in California were teachers, according to the state department of education.

Regardless of their incoming qualifications, however, all Smarter Balanced raters will have to reach a common target: after training, they must be able to show that they can consistently score answers within approved ranges of accuracy, Ms. Cole said.

Clearing that hurdle doesn't ensure job security, though. Their work is monitored as they score, and if their scores don't agree with those of pregraded, model answers often enough—70 percent to 90 percent of the time, depending on the complexity of the question—they can be dismissed. "Once a scorer, not always a scorer," said Luci Willits, the deputy director of Smarter Balanced.

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Disappointing that scorers with actual teaching experience are sorely represented among the test raters. Perhaps that is because of those without teaching experience are paid at a lower rate (in California, certified teachers need to be paid $20 while non-certs can be paid as low as $13/hourly). Perhaps retired teachers and teachers who have left the field for other reasons are just not interested in scoring tests. I would be interested to see the rates of applicants against the rate of hires by profession and degree.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Harvard and nonprofit launch largest library of exceptional K-12 student work

Harvard and nonprofit launch largest library of exceptional K-12 student work | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

The joint venture between the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Expeditionary Learning aims to help educators raise the bar on student achievement

"The project was conceved as a way to move the conversation forward around standards-based learning. While the importance of rigor is often touted, there are very few examples of what that can and should look like. Standards provide goals, but many teachers and administrators don't necessarily know what it will look like when those benchmarks are reached. 

"'I worry that most discussion of standards falls far short of the rigorous analysis and debate that they invite – and require. We need a deeper, richer dialogue about state standards, particularly what they look like in actual student work,' Steve Seidel, director of the Harvard Graduate School of Education's Arts in Education Program, said in the release. 

T"he launch of the program aligns with a university-hosted discussion about what standards look like in action. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Common-Core Testing Contracts Favor Big Vendors

Common-Core Testing Contracts Favor Big Vendors | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

"Most of the biggest contracts being awarded by the two main consortia creating online assessments aligned to the standards are flowing to some familiar industry players.


"Relatively few companies and organizations have the staff and expertise to carry out the broad work demanded by either of the main consortia overseeing the creation of assessments aligned with the Common Core State Standards, according to many who know the industry argue. Those tests of English/language arts and math will be in place in participating states this school year.


"The contractors are handling tasks such as developing test questions; designing technology platforms, and providing support for either Smarter Balanced, which is creating tests being given in 17 states, and the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, which is giving exams in nine states plus the District of Columbia."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Under Common Core, Students Learn Words by Learning About the World

Under Common Core, Students Learn Words by Learning About the World | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
Under the common core, teachers are building students' vocabulary skills by teaching words in context, rather than through word lists.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Although I see this as nothing new, I do see the widespread adoption of this teaching and learning style as a direct and positive result of Common Core adoption. Isabel Beck (as the article appropriately credits) has been telling us this for well...thirty plus years? I have been teaching this way for twenty years and doing workshops with teachers supporting their crossover from word lists to context for the last ten years. Just glad EdWeek is giving context vocabulary instruction the positive attention deserved.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Stakes for “high-stakes” tests are actually pretty low - The Hechinger Report

Stakes for “high-stakes” tests are actually pretty low - The Hechinger Report | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
It turns out that the stakes for this spring’s Common Core-aligned tests are not quite as high as they might seem. The Hechinger Report surveyed the District of Columbia and all 44 states* that have adopted the Common Core and will be administering a Common Core-aligned test this spring to find out how they plan …
more...
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Colleges not ready for 'college ready' Common Core

Colleges not ready for 'college ready' Common Core | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
The Common Core standards are supposed to get students ready for college. But colleges don’t seem ready for them. Five years after states across the nation began to adopt the Common Core, colleges have done little to align their admissions criteria, curricula or educational policies with the new standards. And experts warn that the inertia could...
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

I tend to find that not only are colleges not buying into the Common Core for incoming freshmen, they are not all preparing the pre-service teacher's studying in their academic walls for the reality of Common Core aligned teaching in the classroom. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Oregon governor signs Smarter Balanced opt-out law | Local | The Register-Guard | Eugene, Oregon

Oregon governor signs Smarter Balanced opt-out law | Local | The Register-Guard | Eugene, Oregon | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

"Brushing aside critics, Democratic Gov. Kate Brown has signed a bill that lets parents more easily opt their children out of new standardized education tests based on Common Core standards.

"The move on Monday came despite pressure not to do so from federal education officials, who said the policy could jeopardize about $140 million of Oregon’s annual federal funding. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan personally called Brown in late May to talk about the bill.

"But in a prepared statement, Brown said the bill would require teachers and school administrators to “engage with parents about the value of assessment and the potential consequences if parents opt out and student participation diminishes.”

Brown says she will monitor situation to ensure federal government does not withhold money from Oregon

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

More responsibility beyond teaching is being thrust onto to schools by government. Federal government has long set mandated levels for required testing tying participation rates to funding; now Oregon's  state government will require schools to not only send a letter to parents with guidelines on how to "opt out" but also require schools to convince parents to "opt in." Why can't government take control of their own mandates instead of shifting the responsibility to schools?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Duval schools will switch from textbooks to online printouts for elementary math, reading next year

Duval schools will switch from textbooks to online printouts for elementary math, reading next year | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
The move to a new curriculum will save Duval's schools $10 million and is expected to help children meet tougher academic standards.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Although this practice may seem on the fringes today, tomorrow moving from hard-bound curriculum to on-line accessed materials printed for "just-in-time" applications will be the norm. Why do I suggest that? With the work that Open Education Resources (OER) is doing, not only will EngageNY be a powerful contender against conventional textbook publishers, but will a variety of open-resource vendors, both not-for-profit and for-profit entities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Inspired By Serial, Teens Create Podcasts As A Final Exam

Inspired By Serial, Teens Create Podcasts As A Final Exam | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

In the months leading up to the final exam, 10th grade teacher Alexa Schlechter struggled. She’s an English teacher — an educator of stories told through the written word. But instead of focusing solely on classic books read in the 10th grade, she and her students at Norwalk High School in Connecticut were immersed in a teenage story about murder, set in the 1990s, detailed in blog posts, communicated in audio: Serial, the hit podcast from the producers of This American Life.

After spending months listening to Serial and talking about it as a class, a two-hour sit-down final seemed pointless, irrelevant and an inaccurate gauge of all the learning that had taken place throughout the year. But learning as we know it in schools must be assessed. How else would adults know what kids have learned? So Alexa pursued an end-of-year assessment, possibly worthy of MailChimp (Mail Khimp?), in the form of a podcast.

While driving to school one day, thinking about Serial host Sarah Koenig’s frustrating evolution over the course of the series, Schlechter had what she calls an “aha moment.” Her students would draw on the skills they learned while listening to and studying Serial. They would work in groups (imagine Koenig, Dana Chivvis, Julie Snyder, the engineer who came up with their theme song, Ira Glass). Students would create a series of podcasts told from the point of view of a memoirist they’d read earlier in the year, such as Alice Sebold.

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

From the article, this would seem to be a well-integrated Common Core assessment--moving among and within various standards as teachers and learners experience growth in human understanding and skills with the intricacies of technology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

English Class in Common Core Era: ‘Tom Sawyer’ and Court Opinions

English Class in Common Core Era: ‘Tom Sawyer’ and Court Opinions | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
The standards, which have been adopted by more than 40 states, mandated many changes to traditional teaching, but one of the most basic was a call for students to read more nonfiction.

"In Harrison, N.Y., 10th graders read articles about bipolar disorder and the adolescent brain to help them analyze Holden Caulfield. In Springdale, Ark., ninth graders studying excerpts from “The Odyssey” also read sections of the G.I. Bill of Rights, and a congressional resolution on its 60th anniversary, to connect the story of Odysseus to the challenges of modern-day veterans. After eighth graders in Naples, Fla., read how Tom Sawyer duped other boys into whitewashing a fence for him, they follow it with an op-ed article on teenage unemployment.

"In the Common Core era, English class looks a little different.

The Common Core standards, which have been adopted by more than 40 states, mandated many changes to traditional teaching, but one of the most basic was a call for students to read more nonfiction. The rationale is that most of what students will be expected to read in college and at work will be informational, rather than literary, and that American students have not been well prepared to read those texts."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Shortening the Beowulf excerpt assigned to students is probably among the smartest decision a teacher could make. Indeed, I could interest my students in the text, but their interest did not deepen their understanding of the culture from which it came. And how could it? Although I can imagine life in the Anglo-Saxon past, I will never be sure how close my imagination is to the reality and in reality, it doesn't matter. But modern texts paired with the canon can help kids understand the importance of traditions and cultures across the sweeping bias of  time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Rebooting Alignment

Rebooting Alignment | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

Building units of study around Common Core standards, instead of tagging on standards to units of study already written, is the key for teachers to demonstrate that their curriculum is truly standards aligned.  It might mean pushing curriculum that is two, three, or fifteen years old, into being overhauled; however, through this process, teachers will become fully immersed in the standards and will feel a new sense of purpose in pushing student learning to meet the rigor of the new standards.  I will be challenging my teachers to one task over the summer: can you start from the standards, and build a refreshed unit based solely on students acquiring the skills needed to master the standards chosen?"

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Yes, yes, yes!! We need to be building our units on the foundation of the Common Core Standards, not just reading through existing outcomes and labeling them with number of the standard associated with remotely related skills. Yes, this will take time, but the outcomes will be richer for having thoughtfully designed truly aligned lessons and assessments that teach, reinforce, apply, and assess the valuable skills the standards describe.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

What happens when the Stax Records-connected charter school has to adopt Common Core? - The Hechinger Report

What happens when the Stax Records-connected charter school has to adopt Common Core? - The Hechinger Report | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
MEMPHIS—The Soulsville Charter School in South Memphis — the neighborhood whose soul music influenced the world — once required all students to take at least one music class each year. But educators here saw how behind some of their students were in reading and math, so even at a school linked to the iconic Stax …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Shanahan on Literacy: To Group or Not to Group-- That is the question

Shanahan on Literacy: To Group or Not to Group-- That is the question | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
Shanahan’s (clever) response: 
To group or not to group, that is the question.
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the
slings and arrows of whole class instruction, 
or to take arms against a sea of troubles
and by small group teaching, end them?
There must be something in the water. This is the third time in a week that folks have asked me about whole class/small group instruction.
My first response is that I fully appreciate your situation. I definitely agree that teachers need some kind of general plan to follow when it comes to planning and implementing instruction. You simply cannot make everything up every day, so having some set time allotments makes sense (David Letterman always had his Top Ten List—and probably for the same reasons you have whole class and small group instruction—though I assume your teaching isn’t as funny). Teaching (like doctoring, engineering, lawyering, presidenting and other work verbs) is difficult and the Nobel Prize winner, Herb Simon, showed why, when engaged in challenging tasks, it is beneficial to routinize. So, I’ll give you an A+ in trying to develop a schema to work within day to day.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Though not specifically a post on the Common Core, Shanahan writes about the dilemma of choice between whole group instruction and small group learning and facilitation in the process of teaching literacy. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Thanks to Common Core, most states will finally close the “honesty gap” | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute

Thanks to Common Core, most states will finally close the “honesty gap” | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

In 2007, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute published what was probably the most influential study in our eighteen-year history: The Proficiency Illusion. Using data from state tests and NWEA’s Measures of Academic Progress, our partners at NWEA estimated the “proficiency cut scores” of most of the states in the country

In summary:

  1. It’s critically important that states tell parents, teachers, and kids the truth about whether individual students are on track for college or career. By moving to tougher, Common Core- aligned assessments with much higher cut scores, states can finally close the honesty gap and make good on this commitment.
     
  2. It’s not practical to link high school graduation to college readiness—unless we want to deny diplomas to a majority of the nation’s twelfth graders. Colleges, on the other hand, should stop admitting students who are well below the college-ready level.
     
  3. When it comes to measuring the effectiveness of schools—the true purpose of state accountability systems—fairness demands that we control for the performance of students on the front end. Thus, rating systems should be based on individual student growth over time.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

The benefits of the Common Core to education and the society in general out-weigh the cries of those who misrepresent what the standards say and what the standards mean. Even with shared expectations, we have local control because we, the people of our own communities control who is running our schools and teaching in our classrooms. We control the books our taxes pay for and the professional development our teachers receive. A set of common standards does not mute our voices or paralyze our minds and hands.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

EngageNY's ELA curriculum is uncommonly engaging | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute

"EngageNY’s English language arts materials supply educators—both inside and outside New York State—an important alternative to traditional textbooks of questionable quality and alignment.


"After adopting the Common Core standards and receiving almost $700 million in the second round of Race to the Top in 2010, New York embarked on an ambitious (and unprecedented) effort to develop its own comprehensive, Common Core-aligned ELA and mathematics curricula. The process kicked off in early 2012, when the New York State Education Department (NYSED) issued an RFP to develop “modules of learning” aligned to the new standards. Common Core Inc. (now Great Minds), a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit and curriculum developer, was contracted to develop math materials. The Core Knowledge Foundation, Expeditionary Learning, and the Public Consulting Group (PCG) were awarded contracts to develop ELA materials for grades pre-K–2, 3–5, and 6–12 respectively. (PCG later subcontracted the grades 6–8 portion of their contract to Expeditionary Learning and focused on materials for grades 9–12.) Today, EngageNY comprises a nearly complete set of curricular materials for math and ELA. Those materials are freely available online to anyone—not just Empire State educators—at EngageNY.org."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

As an active reviewer of Common Core aligned curriculum (written by textbook publishers and other educational institutions), I can wholeheartedly agree with the Porter-Magee and Sears article. Although national publishers are becoming more aligned with the standards, the gaps that exist in their programs are more difficult to edit because of the sheer volume of materials and layers of bureaucracy. Content coming from Expeditionary Learning, Odell Education and others are quickly edited/revised when weaknesses are/were seen giving their products greater fidelity to the Common Core.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

No Child Left Behind Overhaul Needs to Fix Education Funding - US News

No Child Left Behind Overhaul Needs to Fix Education Funding - US News | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it

"Right now, it often seems like the national education debate is dominated by a single topic: Tests. Should parents opt-out their kids? Should teachers be evaluated on student test scores? Will the new Common Core exams be better than those in the past?

"These questions are all important. Clearly, we must take steps to overhaul the way that children are assessed. But the testing debate often overshadows other much-needed reforms, most notably improving the nation's education funding system. And as Congress turns its attention to reauthorizing the No Child Left Behind Act, we need to do more to ensure that education spending works to help all students.

"School funding reform should be at the top of the national education agenda. In too many areas, there are deep fiscal inequities between the schooling haves and the schooling have-nots. In Illinois, for instance, a recent research report by the Education Trust found that wealthy districts land over $2,500 more per student."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

With parents and communities up in arms over Common Core and related annual NCLB testing, reauthorization of ESEA is taking place in a less contentious environment. Perhaps parents and communities should get more worked up over the processes of school funding.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Core of the Matter: Majority of Americans Support the Common Core, They Just Don’t Know It (#CoreMatters)

Core of the Matter: Majority of Americans Support the Common Core, They Just Don’t Know It (#CoreMatters) | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
In the nearly twenty years I have spent writing about education, few issues have sparked as much debate as the Common...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
Scoop.it!

Education doesn’t need Common Core reform, teachers need the time and resources to build great schools - The Hechinger Report

Education doesn’t need Common Core reform, teachers need the time and resources to build great schools - The Hechinger Report | Common Core ELA_Literacy | Scoop.it
Dear Jayne, In my last letter, I asked a question that I think lies at the heart of the Common Core debate. I was disappointed that you did not respond to it. Here it is again, with context: Jayne, there was nothing to prevent you from challenging all children before the Common Core arrived. I …
more...
No comment yet.