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8 Strategies for Teaching Academic Language

8 Strategies for Teaching Academic Language | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
"Change your language and you change your thoughts." -- Karl Albrecht

Understanding Academic Language

Academic language is a meta-language that helps learners acquire the 50,000 words that they are...

Via Mel Riddile
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

A number of good points made in this blog. Sentence frames are great for strugglers, so that is not at the top of my list, so be sure and keep reading!!

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Lucas Arnestad's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:49 PM

Teaching academic language is very important in all grades. By teaching kids these vocabulary words it helps them solve higher level problems by understanding every part of the problem. Eventually with consistent learning of new vocabulary it makes the student have better grades, get into a better college, and then get a great job. This article introduces 8 strategies of teaching academic language. If I were a teacher I would dynamically introduce academic vocabulary. It's having your students read authentic context with vocabulary words in the text. Repeated encounters with a word can help students internalize the definition. When I was younger, unlike some kids, I didn't want to read very much. So having every student in your class read the vocabulary filled test insures that every student has a chance to learn.

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New Studies Reaffirm PARCC as One of Nation’s Premier Tests

New Studies Reaffirm PARCC as One of Nation’s Premier Tests | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

Two recently released independent studies found the PARCC assessment to be one of the strongest systems to assess student readiness for college and careers. The studies, conducted by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute (elementary and middle school) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO, high school) are just the latest in a string of independent studies that have found PARCC to be a national leader in quality assessments. PARCC received the highest marks possible for measuring of students’ mastery of English language arts, the highest ratings for measuring vocabulary skills, and highlighted PARCC’s use of evidence-based questions. PARCC also scored highly in many other areas.

“These reports definitively confirm what we’ve been saying for some time – PARCC is the highest-quality, best-in-class assessment available,” said Hanna Skandera, Secretary of Education for the New Mexico Public Education Department and Chair of the PARCC Governing Board. “Since the inception of PARCC, we’ve been committed to giving our parents and schools the information they deserve to help our kids reach their full potential.”

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

I have been working with teachers to understand and use the PARCC Framework and PARCC released items as tools to strengthen curricular alignment to the Common Core Standards...and it works. Yes, PARCC is the most aligned to the content and depth, the spirit and letter of the standards. I celebrate the findings of the Fordham Institute with PARCC!!

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, February 13, 5:29 PM

I have been working with teachers to understand and use the PARCC Framework and PARCC released items as tools to strengthen curricular alignment to the Common Core Standards...and it works. Yes, PARCC is the most aligned to the content and depth, the spirit and letter of the standards. I celebrate the findings of the Fordham Institute with PARCC!!

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TEACHING HIGHER Educators’ Perspectives on Common Core Implementation

"Now that the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has resolved the struggle over the federal role in education, leaders in the remaining Common Core states can refocus attention on the standards, the assessments, and the supports teachers and students need to succeed on them. To inform those efforts, the Center for Education Policy Research (CEPR) at Harvard University surveyed a representative sample of teachers in five states (Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, and Nevada) as they prepared their students to take the new Common Core-aligned assessments in the spring of 2015.


"We asked teachers and principals about the types and amounts of professional development they received, the textbooks they were using, the online resources they found most helpful, and the alignment between Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and teacher evaluations. We studied how each of the above was related to students’ performance on the new assessments, after controlling for students’ demographic characteristics and prior achievement on state assessments. We report four primary findings:

  1.  Teachers in the five study states have made major changes in their lesson plans and instructional materials to meet the CCSS.
  2.  Despite the additional work, teachers and principals in the five states have largely embraced the new standards.
  3. In mathematics, we identified three markers of successful implementation: more professional development days, more classroom observations with explicit feedback tied to the Common Core, and the inclusion of Common Core-aligned student outcomes in teacher evaluations. All were associated with statistically significantly higher student performance on the PARCC and Smarter Balanced assessments in mathematics.
  4. In English language arts, we did not find evidence for or against any particular implementation strategies. However, the new English assessments appear more sensitive to instructional differences between teachers, especially in middle school grades. The greater sensitivity seems to be due to the greater weight on student writing in the new assessments. Although prior research has found math achievement to be more sensitive to instructional differences between teachers than English, the new English assessments are nearly as sensitive to teacher effects as the math assessments have been.


Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

The greatest instruction differences identified in the assessment process related to Common Core Standards appears to result from the emphasis on writing and the place writing takes in the classrooms. No surprise. With next gen assessments valuing writing and too many teachers intimidated by both the instruction (which they shouldn't be...just write), and the grading, some students are having the opportunities to grow as thinkers and communicators in the domain of writing.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, February 12, 6:50 PM

The greatest instruction differences identified in the assessment process related to Common Core Standards appears to result from the emphasis on writing and the place writing takes in the classrooms. No surprise. With next gen assessments valuing writing and too many teachers intimidated by both the instruction (which they shouldn't be...just write), and the grading, some students are having the opportunities to grow as thinkers and communicators in the domain of writing.

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New, Reading-Heavy SAT Has Students Worried

New, Reading-Heavy SAT Has Students Worried | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

"BOSTON — For thousands of college hopefuls, the stressful college admissions season is about to become even more fraught. The College Board, which makes the SAT, is rolling out a new test — its biggest redesign in a decade, and one of the most substantial ever. Chief among the changes, experts say: longer and harder reading passages and more words in math problems. The shift is leading some educators and college admissions officers to fear that the revised test will penalize students who have not been exposed to a lot of reading, or who speak a different language at home — like immigrants and the poor. It has also led to a general sense that the new test is uncharted territory, leaving many students wondering whether they should take the SAT or its rival, the ACT. College admissions officers say they are waiting to see how the scores turn out before deciding how to weight the new test."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

The issue here is not the number of words. The article explains that SAT was careful to keep the number of words in texts similar to past counts; however, the complexity of the language, the contexts within which the language is used, and the content of the texts is where the challenge exists. Yes, SAT is taking text complexity seriously.

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Does Disciplinary Literacy Have a Place in Elementary School?

Does Disciplinary Literacy Have a Place in Elementary School? | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
Few issues are hotter now than disciplinary literacy. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) established disciplinary reading goals for grades 6–12, and most of the research on that topic has been done at those grades, too. That means elementary teachers can breathe a sigh of relief, right? Not really. There might not be specific disciplinary goals set for the young'uns, but elementary teachers still have an important role to play if their students are to eventually reach college- and career-readiness.
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Common Core survey responses put focus on standards for youngest grades

Common Core survey responses put focus on standards for youngest grades | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
Seventy-one percent of responses were positive in an online survey completed by more than 10,500 people.
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SAT attempting to regain the spotlight with new version

SAT attempting to regain the spotlight with new version | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
Local high-school students who take the SAT on March 5 will be part of the first nationwide group to take a brand-new version, the first major revision since 2005. But few central Ohio students are likely to note the difference, as the SAT’s competitor, the ACT, has blown past the SAT in popularity.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

No surprise that the SAT is aligning itself to the Common Core. With David Coleman at the helm of the College Board and the competition between ACT and SAT going strong, Common Core alignment is a must!

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Will States Swap Standards-Based Tests for SAT, ACT?

Will States Swap Standards-Based Tests for SAT, ACT? | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
An ESSA provision that lets states use college-entrance exams to measure student achievement could spur a profound shift in high school testing.

"The questions are hanging over a provision of the Every Student Succeeds Act that lets states measure high school achievement with college-entrance exams instead of standards-based assessments.

"If many states make that change, it would represent an important national shift in the meaning of high school testing, assessment experts say.

"That's because most states' current tests are based on their academic standards and are built to measure mastery of those standards. Moving to a college-entrance exam such as the SAT or ACT, which are designed to predict the likelihood of students' success in college, would mean that states had chosen instead to measure college readiness."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

At an Illinois school on Monday, the first day back from holiday break, I was asked by teachers this very same question. Was our state now going to SAT testing for annual achievement assessment. I hadn't heard any such thing...in the past we've been an ACT state, something I have never agreed with in the practice of NCLB compliance. As this article says, these college entrance tests do not asses what high school considers important. Of course, now that ACT and SAT have revamped their own college readiness standards to reflect the Common Core, there may be more validity in their use, but that remains to be determined through years of outcome analysis. Personally and professionally, I believe we need to assess kids on what we teach and what we teach should be standards based. National assessments have a place but not in local evaluation of school success.

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Education myth: American students are over-tested - The Hechinger Report

Education myth: American students are over-tested - The Hechinger Report | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
Andreas Schleicher, an international education expert based in Paris, attended a summit at the White House last month, and left feeling frustrated by the anti-testing backlash in this country. “I listened to several presentations. You got this impression, if they would only get rid of tests, everything would improve,” said Schleicher, who oversees the education and skills …
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

I've been around education for many years--as a student (always), as the parent of three children who all graduated from high school and college, and as an educator (for nearly thirty years). There are no more tests in my local school or the schools I've worked with today than there were when I was in school. What has changed is how the assessments are used--and maybe that hasn't changed as much as we think. I remember reading SRA cards and answer questions that I think isn't much different than the AR programs many schools have in place. I will admit, I have been in some schools where testing is over the top--with NWEA and Study Island and all other kinds of monthly assessments to monitor learning. But those schools, in my experience are in the minority--most schools that I spend time with don't have the money to throw at the computer screen. Instead, they use real humans, caring teachers to assess student progress.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, December 11, 2015 5:01 PM

I've been around education for many years--as a student (always), as the parent of three children who all graduated from high school and college, and as an educator (for nearly thirty years). There are no more tests in my local school or the schools I've worked with today than there were when I was in school. What has changed is how the assessments are used--and maybe that hasn't changed as much as we think. I remember reading SRA cards and answer questions that I think isn't much different than the AR programs many schools have in place. I will admit, I have been in some schools where testing is over the top--with NWEA and Study Island and all other kinds of monthly assessments to monitor learning. But those schools, in my experience are in the minority--most schools that I spend time with don't have the money to throw at the computer screen. Instead, they use real humans, caring teachers to assess student progress. 

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Common Core Standards Adoption by State

Common Core Standards Adoption by State | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

"States highlighted in green have adopted the Common Core State Standards. 


"States highlighted in blue only adopted the Common Core State Standards for English language arts.

"For additional details, click on the name of the state in the listing below..."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

With media coverage of standards' reviews and test unrest, many people seem to have become confused about which states have adopted and adhered to the Common Core Standards. ASCD provides a handy map and links for state-by-state details.

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California Set to Adopt Literacy Materials Tied to Common Core - Education Week

California Set to Adopt Literacy Materials Tied to Common Core - Education Week | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

"The largest of the common-core adoption states is poised to approve 25 of the 29 materials submitted by publishers.


"California, the largest common-core-adoption state, is on the verge of adopting new K-8 English/language arts instructional materials for the first time since it put the Common Core State Standards in place—and nearly all the textbooks that were submitted for review are likely to be approved.

"Materials adoptions in the Golden State have historically been influential in defining the publishing market and other states' curricular choices, but many say this year's board vote will make less of a splash nationally. For one, California has changed a policy that once required districts to choose from the state-approved list. And states and districts now have access to more materials—including free digital resources—that meet their needs.

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

As one who served on this review committee and the supplemental review committee of 2012, I noted the process was smoother. Even with the added standards for English Language Learners, the process moved more quickly. However, I would add that the facilitation of discussion in this review process did not lend itself to the rich conversations of the previous review. Rather, the review guidance tended to support the approval standards alignment in light of weaker evidences than were accepted in the ELA review of supplemental materials. 

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Tennessee Pre-K: A Lesson on Why the Early Grades Matter Too | EdCentral

Tennessee Pre-K: A Lesson on Why the Early Grades Matter Too | EdCentral | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

"This week, the Peabody Research Institute at Vanderbilt University released findings from a study of Tennessee’s Voluntary Prekindergarten Program (TN-VPK) that has created some unrest in the early education community. In A Randomized Control Trial of a Statewide Voluntary Prekindergarten Program on Children’s Skills and Behaviors through Third Grade, researchers Mark Lipsey, Dale Farran, and Kerry Hofer found that children who attended TN-VPK, a full-day pre-K program serving approximately 20 percent of the state’s highest need four-year-olds, are performing no better in third grade than their counterparts.


"The researchers conducted a randomized control trial, following a group of approximately 1,000 Tennessee children over five years. The report states that, “At the end of pre‐k, the TN‐VPK children had significantly higher achievement scores on all 6 of the [literacy, language, and math] subtests, with the largest effects on the two literacy outcomes.” Kindergarten teachers also reported positive non-cognitive gains at the beginning of the year: “the teachers rated the TN‐VPK children as being better prepared for kindergarten work, as having better behaviors related to learning in the classroom and as having more positive peer relations.” The pre-K program had a particularly strong and positive impact on dual-language learners."

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SAT Essay Losing Steam Among Admissions Officers -- THE Journal

SAT Essay Losing Steam Among Admissions Officers -- THE Journal | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
University admissions officers are ho-hum about the essay question. According to a survey of 300 colleges and universities, only a handful of them will expect applicants to submit their score from the new SAT's essay section.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

We have talked about the portfolio system in college application for years...is this really going to happen?

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Test Scores Under Common Core Show That ‘Proficient’ Varies by State - The New York Times

Test Scores Under Common Core Show That ‘Proficient’ Varies by State - The New York Times | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
For tests given last spring under the new Common Core requirements, the description of the results comes down to the different labels each state uses to describe the exact same scores on the same tests.
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Evaluating the Content and Quality of Next Generation Assessments | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute

Evaluating the Content and Quality of Next Generation Assessments | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

"Evaluating the Content and Quality of Next Generation Assessments examines previously unreleased items from three multi-state tests (ACT Aspire, PARCC, and Smarter Balanced) and one best-in-class state assessment, Massachusetts’ state exam (MCAS), to answer policymakers’ most pressing questions: Do these tests reflect strong content? Are they rigorous? What are their strengths and areas for improvement? No one has ever gotten under the hood of these tests and published an objective third-party review of their content, quality, and rigor. Until now.

"Over the last two years, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, along with two rock-star principal investigators and almost forty equally stellar reviewers used a new methodology designed to answer policymakers’ most pressing questions: Do these tests reflect strong content? Are they rigorous? What are their strengths and areas for improvement?

"As our benchmark, we used the Council of Chief State School Officers’ Criteria for Procuring and Evaluating High-Quality Assessments. We evaluated the summative (end-of-year) assessments in the capstone grades for elementary and middle school (grades 5 and 8). (The Human Resources Research Organization evaluated high-school assessments.)"

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Where Are Teachers Getting Their Common-Core Instructional Materials?

"A new study found that teachers are mainly relying on homegrown instructional materials, created either by themselves or their district colleagues, to meet the Common Core State Standards. But as many as a third of the 4th-8th grade teachers surveyed also said they've turned to free online platforms such as EngageNY and LearnZillion to implement the new benchmarks. 

"The study, conducted by the Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard University, overall confirmed that the Common Core State Standards really are changing classroom instruction. As my colleague Ross Brenneman wrote, the report includes a series of interesting findings about what teachers are doing differently (they're putting more emphasis on nonfiction in ELA and conceptual understanding in math, for instance) and strategies that help improve instruction (collaboration is NOT the key, it turns out). Head to his post for more on the study in its entirety."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Teachers went without vendor textbooks for such a long time that they turned to one another for resources...and that, IMHO is a good move.

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High-Quality Preschool Why We Need It and What it Looks Like

"Research has consistently shown that 3- and 4-year-olds who attend a high-quality preschool are more successful in kindergarten and beyond—both academically and socially. But the majority of preschool programs in the United States are not judged as good, with many rated far below that. Many of our most vulnerable children attend the lowest quality programs, and children who are at risk for school failure are more strongly influenced by the quality of preschool. Many children from middle-class families also attend preschools that are not of good quality. Momentum is building across the country to develop more preschool programs. Therefore, it’s crucial to have a clear vision of what high-quality preschool programs look like."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Our tiniest citizens are entitled to the best teachers education can offer to support the growth of their minds and hears. They cannot do this alone. Today, for many preschoolers, interactive play means pointing and clicking on a digital screen not pretending, imagining, communicating with other children.  Quality teachers can offer the kinds of intellectual stimulation little ones deserve to become the adults our world needs.

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Here's what will change with the new SAT

Here's what will change with the new SAT | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

SAT prep is a multi-billion dollar industry today. Will the redesigned SAT restore its original goal of providing greater access to higher education for a diverse population?


"The revisions to the SAT to begin in March 2016 include a return to the original scoring system of 1,600 for combined math and the newly named “evidenced-based reading” subtests.

Writing an essay will now be optional. The current version (in use since 2004) requires the essay for a three-part test, with a maximum score of 2,400. This optional essay provides greater flexibility for students, particularly for those whose math skills may be much stronger than their writing skills. Such students will not be penalized for a lower writing score.


"Importantly, there will be no penalty for guessing on questions – previously a wrong answer got a penalty of a quarter-point. The critical reading section, renamed evidenced-based reading and writing, will use historical documents that have inspired individuals. Examples of this would be speeches by India’s leader of independence movement Mohandas Gandhi, American women’s rights' activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.


"The math revisions are said to be aligned with the Common Core. This section will have less computation and more real-world problems."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

SAT's redesign makes the assessment more aligned to Common Core Standards in ELA, literacy, and math. Although many people still think the Common Core is going away, the reality is that Common Core Standards have become embedded in national testing, among state's standards (though often renamed), and in the manner by which public discussions and debates are being held. 

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What happened when one state tried to rewrite the Common Core - The Hechinger Report

What happened when one state tried to rewrite the Common Core - The Hechinger Report | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

CROWLEY, La. — "...with nearly two dozen states revising the Common Core standards, policymakers are grappling with what role, if any, parents should have in tweaking those standards.  Can teams of educators in states like Louisiana improve standards that were years in the making? And can the revision process serve both an educational and a political purpose — generating more buy-in for the standards while simultaneously improving them?

"As in many states, Louisiana’s Common Core review is the result of years of pressure from parents and politicians. Last year, lawmakers — in an effort to neutralize the issue in the months leading up to this November’s gubernatorial election — charged a committee with coming up with “Louisiana standards” to take effect next August. But, as in other states, opponents say the process has been too rushed and unsuited to accepting parental input, and amounts to little more than a political show."


Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

As this story goes on to tell, although public opinion polls show a dislike of Common Core State Standards, actual online surveys tell a different story. Nationwide, through online surveys, the public has an 80% confidence rating in the Common Core and of those surveyed more than 25% report as parents. Indeed, the CCSS are not perfect but what set of standards is perfect? Review the standards if need be, but only after devising a plan for the review that is followed fidelity and integrity, and include teachers and parents as well as other stakholders.

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Can parents help with math homework? YES | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute

Can parents help with math homework? YES | The Thomas B. Fordham Institute | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

"My wife and I both spend time working with our kids on their homework. We have also made a family tradition of “Saturday School,” a routine that my wife and I instituted a couple of years ago because our kids’ school was using a pre-Common Core math curriculum that wasn’t keeping pace with the standards. It has become a weekly exercise for the whole family’s brain. On my personal blog, I’ve shared some of the math problems that I’d written for Saturday School so that other parents could use the problems at home if they wished.

"On busy nights, most parents (including me) are hard-pressed to find time to help with daily homework. That’s why my first piece of advice for parents is that they help strengthen their children’s work ethic and accountability by ensuring that homework is completed. My kids have their own dedicated space at home for schoolwork. When they get home from school, the next day’s homework has to be complete and correct before there is any screen time or other activities.

"Parents can also help at home with skill building and fluency practice—things like memorizing basic math facts. When it comes to skills, practice is essential. It helps students to have someone to flash the cards or pose calculations to them. I have made flashcards that we use at home, and my kids sometimes use digital apps like Math Drills."

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Jason Zimba makes a clear statement here: the responsibility for your children's learning of math is not one held solely by the teacher. Just as parents need to read to their youngsters, they also need to show a value for math by engaging their children with mathematical practices and valuing the homework teachers provide.

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Common Core's Big Test: Tracking 2014-15 Results

Common Core's Big Test: Tracking 2014-15 Results | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
The 2014-15 school year marked a big change for many states because they switched to tests that for the first time reflect the Common Core State Standards.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

I have long been a supporter of Common Core and PARCC assessment. I am hopeful but not confident that ESSA will cause our schools to once again be thrown into curricular chaos. But that is another story. What I am disappointed with is the delay in publicizing our schools' scores. I want "things" done right but when so many other states have let their results be known, why are we lagging behind?

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ACT Writing Test Scoring Rubric.pdf

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, October 23, 2015 10:11 AM

Interested in ACT's new analytic writing rubric? Since the beginning of ACT's writing assessment, student compositions have been scored holistically using a six-point guide. This year, ACT has adopted an analytic rubric which will be much more helpful as a tool for teachers and students in understanding where the writing succeeds and/or misses the mark.

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States Debate Cut Scores

States Debate Cut Scores | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it
Arkansas has reversed course after becoming the second state, following Ohio, to forgo the recommended score rating levels set by Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) states. After facing public backlash for declaring students who are “nearing expectations” according to PARCC to be considered “on track (PDF),” Arkansas state chief Johnny Key has since declared the previous phrasing an error (PDF) and announced that the state will now use PARCC’s established performance descriptions. Ohio, however, has not backtracked its scoring decisions. Neither state plans to use the PARCC assessments next year—Arkansas will administer an ACT suite of tests while Ohio plans to use tests developed by the American Institutes for Research.
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Unfortunately, some students will be seeing the third high stakes assessment in as many years while political leadership decides how to test students for NCLB compliance.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, October 22, 2015 6:08 PM

Unfortunately, some students will be seeing the third high stakes assessment in as many years while political leadership decides how to test students for NCLB compliance.

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How Common Core quietly won the war - POLITICO

How Common Core quietly won the war - POLITICO | Common Core ELA | Literacy & Math | Scoop.it

"The standards that naysayers love to call “Obamacore” have become the reality for roughly 40 million students.


"After years of hand-wringing, very few of the 45 states that fully adopted the standards have attempted a clean break — and those that did found it wasn’t easy to do. In Indiana, where Republican Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill last year to ditch the standards, even Common Core haters have said the new ones are just the same standards by a different name.


"As Common Core becomes more commonplace in public schools (and in many Roman Catholic schools), some prominent Republicans concede they've lost their battle. Take former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer. As governor, she signed an executive order banning the use of the words Common Core by state agencies, though the standards themselves were still firmly in place. She wrote in a recent column on the Fox News website that implementation of the standards is “succeeding.”

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

The Common Core State Standards never set their sights on war--the goal was to make consistent the expectations of learning across geographies, incomes, and cultures. Unfortunately, political groups and pundits used the standards as a means to stir divisiveness. The reason states cannot design a unique set of standards is because the existing CCSS is a well-written and well-meaning document. Good triumphs.

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Governor Cuomo Announces Launch of Common Core Task Force | Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today launched the Common Core Task Force – a diverse and highly-qualified group of education officials, teachers, parents, and state representatives from across New York that is charged with comprehensively reviewing and making recommendations to overhaul the current Common Core system and the way we test our students. The Task Force will complete its review and deliver its final recommendations by the end of this year.

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's insight:

Local review is a positive step forward. For the most part, New York is strongly behind the Common Core. As a state, they have designed curricula in math and ELA (available at Engage NY) that have been downloaded by thousands of teachers across the nation with meaningful results.

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Teacher Leadership | Center for American Progress

This report describes districts throughout the country that have taken collaborative approaches between management and unions to ensure that teachers have significant voice and leadership in implementation of the Common Core. In many cases, these collaborative approaches are not new. Districts and unions across the country—many of them profiled in this report—have been working together to involve teachers in meaningful ways for decades, but these systems have taken on new importance with the rollout of the Common Core.

The districts in this report vary in size, location, student demographics, socioeconomic status, and student academic performance, but all have worked to give teachers a meaningful voice in decision making during the implementation of the Common Core. The districts include: Baltimore City Public Schools in Baltimore, Maryland; Georgetown Exempted Village Schools in Georgetown, Ohio; Marquardt School District 15 in Glendale Heights, Illinois; Poway Unified School District in San Diego, California; San Juan Unified School District in Carmichael, California; and Washoe County School District in Reno, Nevada.

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Shelly Reckow VanVoorst's curator insight, October 25, 2015 3:42 PM

I scooped this article because it speaks about the common core implementation and how groups both administration and teachers need to work together to role it out in the most effective way.  This could be true for almost any initiative that a school takes on.  I hope that when teachers and administrators at my district read this article they take notes on how to work together collaboratively and how to institute leaders within the classroom to be the most effective.  

Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:54 PM

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