Common Core
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Susan Volinski
Scoop.it!

TN Student Speaks Out About Common Core, Teacher Evaluations, and Educational Data - YouTube

Recorded at the Knox County School Board Regular Meeting November 6, 2013 Share this video and spread the message: we will not accept these issues with educa...
Susan Volinski's insight:

     I found this link on YouTube while browsing for different opinions on the common core, and this one being about a Tennessee high school student, Ethan Young, who gave a speech at the Knox County School Board Meeting expressing his arguement against the common core curriculum. He begins the speech by describing the definition of common core, and stating that the standards are made to be rigorous, but the speaker then says that “...rigorous is just a buzz word. These standards aren’t rigorous, they are just different.” I immediately paused the video and thought about what he just said, and I definitely agree with him. For example, if you have been doing 2 + 2 your whole life by counting on your fingers, and then the system changed and no longer were you allowed to count on your fingers, but now you have to set up an array and an equation to solve the problem. The answer doesn’t change, the approach does, and this different approach is what many may feel is “rigorous” because one has to change his or her method of understanding information, when in fact the information isn’t any harder, the approach is what makes it difficult.  

     When the TN student said “the task of teaching is never quantifiable,” I felt that he really understood the teacher's lifestyle because it is really easy to measure success in other professions. For example, a surgeon's success might be measured by the number of successful operations. It’s hard to measure teaching in a classroom, when students learn “creativity, appreciation, and inquisitiveness, they are impossible to scale, but they are the purpose of education.” It was interesting when he said this because it made me realize that yes, students do learn math, science, art, and so on, but some of the most valuable skills are not measured by exams. In today’s society, and with common core, the focus is to prepare students for college and become competitive and valuable to the working and international world. As much as this is true, I personally agree with the speaker when he says that we teach to inspire. Our role in the classroom is to inspire students to strive for success in whatever they want most, and once they are inspired, that inspiration will drive them to become successful and obtain jobs, if that’s where their futures lead. But we don’t know the future, and teaching using common core, we don’t know if those skills will be necessary by the time those students graduate.

      Lastly, I realized that with our society obsessively collecting data on the students' and teachers' performance, this has damaged the joy of education. Constantly implementing new models to gain more test results takes away from the interactive time with students, peers, and teachers. Teachers have become more focused on making sure that students are getting all the information they need to pass standardized tests, and students are being overloaded with copious amounts of information in a short period of time. From what I remember, elementary school used to be fun.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Volinski from CLOVER ENTERPRISES ''THE ENTERTAINMENT OF CHOICE''
Scoop.it!

Parents are schooled in 'new' math - Tribune-Review

Parents are schooled in 'new' math - Tribune-Review | Common Core | Scoop.it
Parents are schooled in 'new' math Tribune-Review With the transition from Adequate Yearly Progress to Common Core standards in Pennsylvania's annual student assessment, Clairton elementary and middle school teachers replaced their mathematics...

Via VERONICA LESTER
Susan Volinski's insight:

     This article offers teachers’ perspectives on the importance of parent involvement with their children who participate in the Common Core Curriculum. The Clairton City School District states that parents are also at-home educators. I always knew that a parent supplemented a child’s learning outside the classroom, but it was excellent of the article to mention that the parents do play a valuable role in a student’s education outside the classroom. Tammy Fine, a parent with children attending the Clairton City School District stated that she wants to know how she is able to help her child do well in the curriculum. The county offers classes where parents come in to learn the new methods so they can take these methods home and help their children in homework. I think it’s wonderful that there are so many parents out there that are willing to help in their children’s education, and it’s great that the school district is helping the parents out by providing resources for them to understand the curriculum. However, not all parents are able to assist their children in homework because many parents have busy lives, and there are parents who just don’t invest a whole lot of time into their children’s lives for other reasons. With the new common core “rigorous” standards, are students able to keep up on their own without parental involvement? If not, are students who are not lucky enough to have a parent/adult educator in their life outside the classroom going to fall behind? 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Volinski from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

Artistic to the Core: Music and Common Core

Artistic to the Core: Music and Common Core | Common Core | Scoop.it
I'm not a gambling person, but if I had to place a bet on one sure-fire method for engaging students, increasing test scores, reaching students who fall below standards, challenging students who exce (Learn how to integrate arts into the Common Core:...

Via Darren Burris
Susan Volinski's insight:

     This offers a perspective of Dr. Nolan, a music professor at the University of Arizona, and a former K-12 music teacher, to bring in the perspective of music education and the common core. She gives an opinion of using art integration into the classroom because it will excel at “engaging students, increasing test scores… accessing students’ creativity and originality” and so much more. If there are so many great benefits for arts integration into the common core curriculum, why aren’t more teachers implementing this? Dr. Nolan suggests that many teachers feel there is not enough time to do such things, and I can see why many teachers would think that. Teachers already have a lot of curriculum to cover in a year, and finding time to engage students in the arts while teaching the basics is difficult. From my experience at my field placement, my cooperating instructor shared with me all the different curriculum that they have to include on a daily basis, not only do they have to incorporate the Common Core standards, but also the curriculum provided by the county. Dr. Nolan suggests that teachers should teach Common Core through the arts, not through independent music lessons. Personally, when I was in school I memorized the fifty states through a fun song, and I still remember it to this day. I feel that students memorize song lyrics much faster than they would memorizing a speech, so I believe teaching should go past just standing in the front of a classroom and handing out worksheets for students do work on. Teachers can integrate arts into the curriculum to make the learning more fun and worthwhile.

     Additionally, incorporating the arts into the curriculum allows for different kinds of learning to be taken place – such as kinesthetic, aural, and visual. Not all students learn well by listening to a teacher and then writing an assignment. Students will feel more engaged and involved if they are given a change every once in a while.  Overall, this article suggests that common core can be taught in many different ways, and even though right now I feel that common core curriculum does not have much room for a teacher to be creative, I believe that incorporating the arts into the curriculum will make learning more fun. 

more...
Emilie Hoogewerff's curator insight, December 20, 2013 10:37 PM

I love this article and how it brings creativity and abstractness and incorporates it with the common core curicculum. I took a music class this semester and going into it I didn't understand the purpose of it because not only am I not a msuical person, but I'm not planning on being a music teacher. I quickly understood through the class though that the point of it is to learn how to incorporate music in the classroom in valuable and meaningful ways. This is much like what this article discusses. This article gives sample lesson plans and incorporates music to it. Structured concepts like math can even be taught effectiviely alongside with music. "Connect math to how sound changes between a musical solo, duet, quintet, 100-piece orchestra, etc." This can not only appeal to a broad range of students who may need a different approach to learning to understand it, but you're still getting accross and teaching concepts required by the common core curicculum.

 "Teachers must think on their feet, modify plans on the spot, approach content from different angles, support uniqueness, and inspire and foster growth." I think this quote is so valuble because of the truth that it brings. This article was inspiring because it made me aware that yes, even with the rigid strucutre of the common core, there are ways to make it creative and fun, like incorporating music to teach it, for example. This fosters creativity while still sticking the the common core lesson plan. 

Scooped by Susan Volinski
Scoop.it!

Maryland teachers prepare for tougher math curriculum - Washington Post

Maryland teachers prepare for tougher math curriculum - Washington Post | Common Core | Scoop.it
Maryland teachers prepare for tougher math curriculum
Washington Post
The academies are in their third year and focus on implementing Common Core.
Susan Volinski's insight:

     This article was published from Washington Post, and it was directly talking about Montgomery County Schools in MD. The article described a new way to approach math in the classroom by focusing on the way a student approached the right answer as oppose to just bubbling A, B, C, or D. Therefore, by around 2014, multiple choice tests will become eliminated. I personally think that this is how math should have been measured years ago because I never understood what a multiple choice test actually taught a student. Does a student didn’t know the answer, but happened to bubble in the correct answer more intelligent than a student who did all the correct work to solve the problem but accidentally circled the wrong answer. According to the scantron, yes. This easy way of measuring “success” is not actually measuring success. In my opinion it measured success and luck. Through common core, I think it’s excellent for students to be graded more on the process of their math answers rather than bubbling in a circle.

     With the new common core standards, the article states that this puts the teachers to the test on how well they can teach all this information in such a short amount of time. The article concludes by Tai, a mother of an elementary school student, saying that “If the teacher is experienced and is devoted and has a lot of training, then this curriculum is good,” basically stating that if common core fails, it’s because of the teacher. This puts a lot of pressure on the teachers, but I do understand where she is coming from when she says that a teacher must be devoted to her students – if a student is struggling and a teacher provides extra support, eventually that student will understand the material. Overall, I believe common core can be good for the students who start out with common core as kindergarteners, but for a classroom of students who transitioned from the old method to common core are going to face the challenges of catching up to where they should be in the new curriculum.

     Side note: under the article’s picture, the caption had the word “rigorous” too, it was interesting to connect this thought to what the other scoop about the TN student that had said the word “rigorous” has been a popular choice word to describe the new common core curriculum, when in fact the curriculum is not necessarily more rigorous, just different, as further supported by the quote, “Montgomery County math teachers are training themselves to teach students in a new style of learning math.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Volinski from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

JAM: CCSS-Moving students from recall to creation and production

Journalism, Arts, and Media (JAM) is an emerging network of after school programs that support elementary school age students in meeting the new Common Core State Standards...

 

...by moving students from the passive recall of content to being the creators and producers of their very own content.


Via Mel Riddile
Susan Volinski's insight:

      The video starts out with a young girl holding an iPad, getting ready to film another girl who is about to speak. This is all part of the new program, JAM. JAM is a Journalism, Arts, and Media course that is incorporated into the common core standards to help students become “college ready”. First of all, I didn’t understand what college actually was until very late middle school. I’ve heard of the word college, but it didn’t mean anything until about 8th or 9th grade. Preparing students to become “college ready” makes me a little sad at times because I understand it is important for children to have a set skill set to take with them to college, but I feel that preparing students for college at the elementary level is too soon. Elementary school was all about learning, exploring, and having fun. By imposing big goals, such as college, some students may stress about what their futures will hold, thus creating a society of overlyfuture-obsessed adults instead of students who live for the moment and in the present.

     Anyways, overall, the JAM program is actually very interesting and cool. JAM uses the media – video, images, and audio to make a product of students’ work, instead of just handing in a paper. Ed Madison, an instructor at the Media Arts Institute comments that when he was in school he had to write a term paper, whereas now with the new common core standards a “term paper” includes images, video, and audio. This is actually pretty great because by adding different methods of expressing what a student learns makes learning more exciting. Instead of writing a paper, a student can make a video and present his argument on camera! An elementary school student commented in the video saying “it’s kinda fun because you sorta get to see your ideas sorta come to life instead of just writing them” and hearing a child say he is enjoying the method is great because that means that the child is learning and enjoying seeing his work and what he learned orally and visually. This is a new way to approach measuring success, and I think it’s a good step in the right direction because not everyone will become an exceptional writer or what-have-you. Some students may have strengths in other areas, such as photography, for instance. This will also engage students in participation and social skills. Students will enjoy seeing their work right in front of them. Incorporating JAM into all the common core programs seems that it will help students in gaining multiple skills and approaches to learning.  

more...
Michael John Maxson's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:48 PM

This shows some of the potential for students to do more rigorous work using the CCSS.

Rescooped by Susan Volinski from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Why I am one of the 75% of teachers supporting the Common Core

Why I am one of the 75% of teachers supporting the Common Core | Common Core | Scoop.it

Via Mel Riddile
Susan Volinski's insight:

     This article presents the perspective of an elementary school teacher, Jessica Moore, from Boulder, CO, I read many articles about teachers arguing against the common core, so it was interesting to hear a perspective of a teacher who supports the common core stating that the curriculum is “good for kids and will help teachers be better educators.” She presents herself as a diverse woman who has worked with children ranging from gifted, to children with emotional and learning disabilities, to second language learners. Moore has had a positive experience with the common core curriculum because her students are asking more questions and are more engaged and interacted in the material being taught. Her whole argument by stating that teachers have more room for creativity and flexibility with the common core standards because they are broader. Personally, I disagree with her statement completely because from what I have seen so far with common core, it seems that there is a new set way of doing a problem, and students must follow the exact new method that was taught. For example, when I was observing my cooperating teacher for my university course – the math problem was along the lines of figuring out how many more candy canes one child had than the other. The teacher then explained the step by step way to solve this problem, by first making an array, then figuring out an equation, and then solving the problem with correct units in the answer. I feel that with the great number of requirements and materials teachers have to teach in such a short amount of time, there isn’t exactly much room for creativity and flexibility.

     Her perspective on common core as an international communication device was interesting: she stated that since all the states in US are under the common core standards, she was able to contact and communicate with teachers from other states to discuss what they were teaching because all being under the same curriculum, they should all be relatively synchronized in the material that they are covering. I wonder if this is a good idea though because different states have a different culture and environment and many lesson plans should be geared toward the students in that classroom.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Volinski from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

A Louisiana Grandparent's perspective on Common Core

A Louisiana Grandparent's perspective on Common Core | Common Core | Scoop.it
Education's Next Horizon board member, Greg Davis, shares his thoughts on the Common Core State Standards and the potential impact on his grandchildren.

Via Darren Burris
Susan Volinski's insight:

     This is an article that is from a grandparent’s positive perspective of the common core in North Lafayette, Louisiana. Off the bat, the article states that every public school in the district he resides in has high poverty rates and is extremely low-performing. The grandparent states, “The Common Core Standard will mean increased rigor for students which will make them better prepared for college or a career.” He seemed excited about this because he feels that more rigor will motivate the students to succeed. If you have read the other articles I have posted, a common theme I have developed among all of them is the word “rigor” or “rigorous” keeps being attached to describe the common core standards. Once again, are they really more rigorous, or is the curriculum just a different approach to solving the same problem. He then emphasizes the importance of rigor by writing in all capital letters, “WE NEED MORE RIGOR. Increased rigor translates to higher expectations.” I don’t know if “rigor” is what our education system needs though. Many students are already slipping behind because curriculum is too challenging, it wouldn’t make it more effective to make the curriculum even harder. I believe we need to eliminate test based learning. In our society, we are always trying to measure success, effort, understanding, and creativity all the time. State tests are usually taken at the beginning, middle, and end of the year, and on top of that, many tests are taken between all those through the whole year. Why are we teaching our students to have good test taking skills? Are we measuring how well a student understands the material, or how well he or she performs on a test?

     The one point I do like that the grandparent makes is that we need to believe in our children and set high expectations. I believe by setting high expectations, students will strive for excellence. If we give up on our children, the children will give up on themselves and the system.

     Lastly, the grandfather mentioned something that irritated me. He commented that students need common core so they can continue by “attending and finishing college, and then competing for the high paying, high demand jobs that make up our workforce.” Personally, when I read this it made me realize that he, as a grandparent, is putting way too much pressure on his own child because he believes that the purpose of education is to get a HIGH paying and HIGH demanding job. To me, he made it seem that successful people have high paying and demanding jobs, when in fact I believe that you do not need a high paying job to be considered successful. Take ballet dancers, unless they are the prima ballerinas, their professional pay is incredibly low. If you base someone’s success on how much money they earn, then there aren’t that many successful people in this world. People are all successful because ultimately people should do what they love and are passionate about, because one will always be successful at doing what they love. 

more...
No comment yet.