Common Core and Teacher Leadership
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Rescooped by Kim Muncie from Common Core ELA
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No Nonsense Non-fiction: Tips for incorporating non-fiction into the ELA curriculum

No Nonsense Non-fiction: Tips for incorporating non-fiction into the ELA curriculum | Common Core and Teacher Leadership | Scoop.it

Many school districts are going through a painstaking process of writing new curricula to meet the Common Core State Standards. One of the biggest changes for English language arts teachers working to refine and update curricula is the need to incorporate larger amounts of nonfiction texts. As ELA teachers, we are experts in teaching literature — but nonfiction? Having recently gone through the process of writing a new middle-school ELA curriculum, I fully understand this challenge. Below are some of the ways our middle school ELA teachers worked to more organically integrate nonfiction texts into our teaching.


Via Deb Gardner, Mary Reilley Clark
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Deb Gardner's curator insight, January 8, 2014 6:10 AM

Keep in mind the expectation to increase non-fiction texts (and more complex texts) is not only in the ELA class, but other subjects as well. 

Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:21 PM

Great examples of how to painlessly add informational text to your teaching.

Rescooped by Kim Muncie from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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What vs. How & Pre-reading Strategies (Introduction) | Burkins & Yaris

What vs. How & Pre-reading Strategies (Introduction) | Burkins & Yaris | Common Core and Teacher Leadership | Scoop.it
In this post we explore three common strategies for introducing text before reading and the ways they do (or don't) align with the Common Core. These strategies have been challenged by the authors of the CCSS and we address this criticism.

 

"The Common Core only tells us what to teach, but doesn’t tell us how to teach."

 

Three traditional practices in literacy education:

1) presenting background information,

2) pre-reading strategies, such as predicting, and

3) articulating a summary of the text.

 

David Coleman Quotes

 

We lavish so much attention on these strategies in the place of reading, I would urge us to instead read. the first escape from the text is to summarize it in advance asking you to just read. To think of dispensing for a moment with all the apparatus we have built up before reading and plunging into reading the text. And let it be our guide into its own challenges. Nothing could be more lethal to paying attention to the text in front of you than such a hunt and seek mission
Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Kim Muncie from Common Core State Standards SMUSD
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Rubric for Determining Text Complexity in Informational Text

This rubric from the DOE of New York City can be used by teachers and library staff to determine text complexity. With modification, it would also be useful for students to help them choose books in the library for research projects.


Via Mary Reilley Clark
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Rescooped by Kim Muncie from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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What are text-dependent questions, and how can teachers develop them?

What are text-dependent questions, and how can teachers develop them? | Common Core and Teacher Leadership | Scoop.it
The Common Core emphasizes close reading and text-dependent questions. So what are text-dependent questions, and how can teachers develop them?

 

Text-dependent questions direct students’ inquiry into the text, rather than outside of it, and can only be answered with evidence from the text.

 

A strong text-dependent question should invite students to interpret theme, analyze syntax and text structure, support students’ understanding of vocabulary, and analyze the effects of specific word choice.

 

A high-quality summative assessment will involve writing and should allow students individually to demonstrate mastery of one or more of the standards.

 

Text-dependent questions will specifically target (Tier 2 Vocabulary) words that might otherwise be a barrier to their comprehension.

 

Identify what makes the text difficult (Quantitative, Qualitative, Reader and Task)

 

Rather than present them randomly, teachers can sequence text-dependent questions to help students gradually unfold their understanding and perform rigorous analysis, learning to stay focused inside of the text to construct meaning.

 

Any good instructional planning begins and ends with standards.

 

Note: When you are working with text-dependent questions to establish rigorous classroom discourse and providing students with routine writing tasks to support comprehension and analysis, you are activating most of the standards for Reading, Writing, and Speaking & Listening most of the time.

 

Assessment: Ensure "that the culminating activity fully aligns with the text-dependent questions and focus standards that you have identified."


Via Mel Riddile
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